UT Austin
Graduate Catalog
1999-2001



CONTENTS

CHAPTER 1
Graduate Study

CHAPTER 2
Admission and Registration

CHAPTER 3
Degree Requirements

CHAPTER 4
Fields of Study

CHAPTER 5
Members of Graduate Studies Committees

APPENDIX
Course Abbreviations
 

Chapter 2: Admission and Registration

Students seeking admission to the Graduate School should consult the printed or online Graduate Admission Bulletin, which contains information and application forms. The student must submit an official transcript from each senior-level college he or she has attended. Specific information about obtaining transcripts and taking the Graduate Record Examinations General Test (GRE) and other admission tests is contained in the bulletin. The applicant should also consult the graduate adviser for the program to which he or she is applying, since many programs require additional material.

A nonrefundable processing fee is charged each applicant to the Graduate School, the Graduate School of Business, or the School of Law. Current fee amounts are given in General Information. Under certain circumstances, applicants to the Graduate School may be eligible for a waiver of the application fee; additional information about the fee waiver is given in the Graduate Admission Bulletin.

Applicants from other countries should consult the bulletin Information for Prospective International Students, available at no charge from the Graduate and International Admissions Center.

Admission

Admission Requirements

General requirements for admission to the Graduate School are

  1. A bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited institution in the United States or proof of equivalent training in a foreign institution.
  2. A grade point average of at least 3.00 in upper-division (junior- and senior-level) coursework and in any graduate work already completed.
  3. An official score on the Graduate Record Examinations General Test (GRE), unless otherwise specified by the graduate program to which the student is applying. The Graduate School of Business requires master's degree applicants to submit a satisfactory score on the Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT) and doctoral degree applicants to submit a satisfactory GRE or GMAT score. Applicants to joint degree programs with the School of Law must submit a satisfactory score on the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) as well as on the GRE or GMAT.
  4. Adequate subject preparation for the proposed major. Evidence of adequate preparation may vary by program, but examples include letters of reference, auditions, samples of work, and personal statements.
  5. A recommendation for acceptance by the Graduate Studies Committee for the proposed major area.

International students whose native language is not English must also submit scores on the Test of English as a Foreign Language.

All complete applications are forwarded to the Graduate Studies Committee to which they are directed.

When there are more qualified applicants than can adequately be instructed by the faculty or accommodated in the facilities, the Graduate Studies Committee for the proposed area may deny admission to students who have met the prescribed requirements. All admissions must be approved by the graduate dean.

Applicants who feel that their grade point averages or test scores are not valid indicators of ability should explain their concerns in a letter to the graduate adviser of the program to which they are applying.

Admission Tests

The Graduate Record Examinations General Test (GRE), the Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT), and the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) may be taken by appointment at computer-based testing centers throughout North America and at selected international sites. A paper-based version of each test is offered at international locations where computer-based testing is not available. Current information about GRE, GMAT, and TOEFL test dates, locations, and registration procedures is published by the Educational Testing Service at http://www.ets.org/.

Applicants to joint programs with the School of Law must also take the Law School Admission Test (LSAT), administered by Law School Admission Services. Information is given in the Law Services Information Book published by the Law School Admission Council. This publication is available from Law School Admission Services, P O Box 2000, Newtown, Pennsylvania 18940-0998.

Admission with Conditions

Almost all of the students who are admitted to the Graduate School have qualifications equal to or better than the minimum standards outlined above.

However, a Graduate Studies Committee may recommend, with the consent of the graduate dean, that a student be admitted to the Graduate School with conditions. The graduate adviser may require the student to maintain a certain grade point average or to take a certain number of semester hours of coursework. A conditionally admitted student may also be required to remedy deficiencies in undergraduate preparation by taking upper-division or graduate courses. The graduate adviser notifies the student of these conditions at the time of admission. A student who does not fulfill the conditions within the specified time may be barred from subsequent registration in the Graduate School. If the student changes his or her major before the conditions have been fulfilled, the conditions remain in effect unless the graduate adviser in the new program petitions for them to be changed.

Admission as a Nondegree Student

An individual who wishes to take graduate coursework without becoming a candidate for an advanced degree may apply for admission to a graduate program as a nondegree (graduate) student. The applicant must submit an application and transcripts of all college coursework to the Graduate and International Admissions Center; Graduate Record Examinations scores are not required. Admission must be recommended by the Graduate Studies Committee for the program and approved by the graduate dean. Enrollment as a nondegree student is limited to one year. Nondegree students are not eligible to be teaching assistants, assistant instructors, or graduate research assistants.

A nondegree (graduate) student who decides to seek a degree must submit an application for admission to the Graduate and International Admissions Center by the program's deadline and must pay the usual application fee. A degree-seeking student may petition to have up to six semester hours of credit in graduate courses, earned while he or she was enrolled as a nondegree student, applied to the graduate degree.

Exchange students. A student who is admitted to the University through a reciprocal exchange program is classified as a nondegree student and is subject to all policies affecting nondegree students. Additional information about the exchange student status is given below.

Applying for Admission

Application for admission to the Graduate School consists of submitting to the Graduate and International Admissions Center the official application form, transcripts, test scores, and processing fees. The Graduate Admission Bulletin contains instructions and forms. Students may also indicate their interest in assistantships and fellowships on these forms.

The Graduate Admission Bulletin is available in print from the Graduate and International Admissions Center and online at http://www.utexas.edu/student/giac/. Students are encouraged to submit online applications because they can be processed more quickly than paper applications.

Each graduate program may require the submission of additional materials. These materials vary by program, but examples include letters of reference, auditions, samples of the student's work, and personal statements. Information about required materials is available from the graduate adviser of each program.

Because graduate programs set their own application deadlines, the applicant must be sure to inquire about the deadline for the program to which he or she is applying. February 1 is often the application date for the summer session and the fall semester, but some programs set different dates. Graduate programs also have various admission deadlines for the spring semester; none of these deadlines is later than October 1. It is the applicant's responsibility to meet the deadline set by the graduate program. A list of program deadlines is given in the Graduate Admission Bulletin.

Applicants should also note that some programs grant admission only for the fall semester.

Deadlines for those seeking financial aid.The usual deadline for an applicant seeking financial aid to submit all materials is February 1 for summer or fall admission or October 1 for spring admission. Individual graduate programs may have earlier or later deadlines. Financial aid decisions are made soon after these program deadlines, and applicants whose materials have not been received may not be given full consideration. Applicants should contact the program of interest of them for current deadlines.

International Students

In addition to meeting the general requirements for admission, applicants whose native language is not English must demonstrate sufficient competence in English to study effectively at the University. These applicants are required to take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and to submit their scores to the Graduate and International Admissions Center. Copies of the TOEFL information bulletin are available from American embassies and consulates, offices of the United States Information Agency, and TOEFL Services, P O Box 6151, Princeton, New Jersey 08541-6151, USA.

Since transcripts from foreign universities require special evaluation, prospective international students are advised to submit their application forms, test scores, and transcripts nine to twelve months before the beginning of the semester for which they are applying. A nonrefundable processing fee is required with each application for admission to the Graduate School or the Graduate School of Business. DO NOT SEND CASH. Cashier's checks, bank money orders, bank drafts, and personal checks are accepted. All payments must be in US dollars and drawn on US banks. Current fee amounts are given in General Information.

International students on nonimmigrant visas must maintain approved comprehensive health insurance or coverage. The student's registration bill includes the insurance premium.

Enrollment Deposit

Some graduate programs require students to pay a nonrefundable enrollment deposit upon admission to indicate that they accept the offer of admission. For students applying to joint degree programs, one deposit serves to confirm the student's intention of enrolling in both programs. When both programs require deposits, only the higher fee is required. The deposit is applied to the payment of fees when the student enrolls. Students who demonstrate financial need may qualify for assistance to cover the deposit.

Readmission

All graduate students are expected to enroll and pay tuition and fees by the twelfth class day of the fall semester and the spring semester of each academic year until they graduate. A student who does not do so must apply for readmission in order to return to the University. He or she must submit an Application for Readmission to the Graduate and International Admissions Center by the appropriate deadline--May 1 for readmission for the summer session; July 1 for the fall semester; and December 1 for the spring semester--and must pay the general application fee. The fee is waived if the student has received an official leave of absence. The student must also obtain the approval of the graduate adviser in the program in which he or she was last enrolled. To change to a different major, the student must submit an Application to Another Graduate Major to the Graduate and International Admissions Center; for additional information, see the section "Application to Another Graduate Major (Change of Major)."

Exchange Students

A student who is admitted to the University through a reciprocal exchange program is classified as a nondegree student. An exchange student may not register for more than two long-session semesters and one summer session. The transferability of academic credit to the student's home institution is determined by the home institution.

An exchange student who wishes to take graduate courses must provide the Graduate and International Admissions Center with a complete record of his or her previous university-level coursework, so that evaluators can determine the student's eligibility for graduate-level study at the University. Providing this record does not guarantee the student's admission to graduate courses: he or she must also meet all course prerequisites and any other requirements affecting nondegree students.

An exchange student may later apply for admission to the University as a degree-seeking student, but only after completion of the exchange period. If the student is admitted as a degree-seeker, credit that he or she earned as an exchange student may be counted toward a University degree only on a limited basis and only with the approval of the student's dean.

Registration

University students register for each semester and summer session either through the Texas Enrollment Exchange telephone registration system (TEX) or through the registrar's online services (ROSE). Complete information about the registration process is given in the Course Schedule.

Registration for New Graduate Students

Applicants are notified by mail of their admission or denial. Admitted applicants should notify their graduate advisers as soon as possible whether they plan to accept admission. Either in an interview or by correspondence, the admitted applicant should then learn the specific requirements of his or her graduate program. Students should consult the Course Schedule to learn whether advising before registration is required in their major area.

Late Registration

The period of late registration is given in the Course Schedule. During this period, a student may register with the consent of the graduate adviser; a late fee is imposed. After this period, registration is permitted only under exceptional circumstances, upon recommendation of the graduate adviser, and with consent of the graduate dean and the registrar.

Registration for Continuing Graduate Students

Continuing graduate students should consult the Course Schedule to learn whether advising before registration is required in their major area.

To continue in the Graduate School beyond the first semester or summer session, the student must make satisfactory progress in fulfilling any admission conditions that were imposed, meet any requirements made in writing by the Graduate Studies Committee, maintain a grade point average of at least 3.00 for all graduate courses, and receive the approval of the Graduate Studies Committee. For further information about grade requirements, see the section "Graduate Credit."

Course Load

Maximum Course Load

The maximum course load for a graduate student is fifteen semester hours in a long-session semester or twelve semester hours in a twelve-week summer session. A heavier course load must have the recommendation of the graduate adviser and the approval of the graduate dean. It is permitted only under exceptional circumstances.

Full-Time Course Load

There is no minimum course load for graduate students; however, the Graduate School recognizes nine semester hours during a long-session semester and three hours during a summer session as a minimum full-time course load. Individual graduate programs may require more.

Under various circumstances, graduate students must be registered for and must remain registered for a full-time load, defined as follows:

Holders of Graduate School-administered fellowships and scholarships: Nine hours each semester and six hours in the summer session (in any combination of summer-session terms).

Assistant instructors, teaching assistants, assistants (graduate), graduate research assistants, and academic assistants: Nine hours each semester and three hours in the summer session (in any combination of summer-session terms).

Students receiving certain student loans: Nine hours each semester and three hours in the summer-session (in any combination of summer-session terms).

Students living in University housing should consult the Division of Housing and Food Service for course-load regulations.

International students: Nine hours each semester. An international student must consult with the International Office and must have the written permission of his or her dean to take fewer than nine hours. No minimum load is required in the summer. Some approved courses in English as a second language do not carry University credit, but each course is considered the equivalent of a three-hour course for purposes of the course load requirement.

Affiliated studies: Students participating in study abroad programs offered by other institutions with which the University has an affiliation agreement and students engaged in independent study or research who have been awarded a University-approved scholarship, fellowship, or grant may register for affiliated studies. Students enrolled in affiliated studies are considered full-time students.

Agencies that grant loans or provide for educational funding may establish different definitions of full-time status. The student should be familiar with the regulations of any agency to which he or she has an obligation.

In Absentia Registration

Ordinarily, students must be registered for the semester in which they graduate and must apply for graduation by the deadline published in the academic calendar. There are no exceptions to this policy for fall semester and spring semester graduation; if a student completes all degree requirements but misses the deadline for acceptance of the thesis, report, dissertation, or treatise, then he or she must register and pay tuition and fees the following semester or summer session in order to receive the degree.

An exception is made for students who apply to graduate in the summer session but miss the deadline for acceptance of the thesis, report, dissertation, or treatise. In this case, the student will be registered in absentia for the fall semester, only for the purpose of receiving the degree, by degree evaluators in the Office of Graduate Studies. The thesis, report, dissertation, or treatise must be accepted by the deadline for in absentia registration, which falls before the beginning of the following fall semester. The fee for in absentia registration is $25. The student will be registered in absentia only once.

Adding and Dropping Courses

Before classes begin, a student may add or drop a course through TEX or ROSE as described in the Course Schedule. The student may also add or drop a course through TEX or ROSE during the first four class days of a long-session semester. From the fifth through the twelfth class day, he or she may add or drop a course with the approval of his or her graduate adviser and of the department in which the course is given. After the twelfth class day, the student may add a course only under rare and extenuating circumstances approved by the graduate dean.

In each summer-session term, the student may add or drop a course through TEX or ROSE during the first two class days. On the third and fourth class days he or she may add or drop a course with the approval of his or her graduate adviser and of the department in which the course is given. After the fourth class day, the student may add a course only under rare and extenuating circumstances approved by the graduate dean.

A student may drop a course with the required approvals through the last class day of a semester or summer term. He or she receives a refund for courses dropped by the twelfth class day of a long-session semester or by the fourth class day of a summer term. From the thirteenth through the twentieth class day of a long-session semester, and from the fifth through the tenth class day of a summer term, the student may drop a course with no academic penalty; the symbol Q is recorded. If the student drops a course after that time, the instructor determines whether the symbol Q or a grade of F should be recorded.

If the student is in a warning status because of failure to maintain a grade point average of at least 3.00, he or she may not drop a course without the recommendation of the graduate adviser and the approval of the graduate dean.

The student should note that dropping a course may cause his or her course load to drop below that required for full-time status.

Specific deadlines for adding and dropping courses are given in the academic calendar; procedures are given in the Course Schedule.

Evaluation

Faculty members are free to develop their own methods of evaluating the performance of students in their classes, but they are required to make the methods of evaluation to be used known in writing before the end of the fourth class day each semester and the second class day each summer term. Responsibility for assuring adequate methods of evaluation rests with departmental faculties and is subject to administrative review. In courses with multiple sections, departments should provide for necessary coordination. Materials used in evaluating a student's performance must be collected by the instructor at or before the regularly scheduled final examination. The final examination is the most common method of final evaluation in courses.

After a grade has been reported to the registrar, it may not be changed unless an error was made by the instructor.

Symbols

Under specific conditions, instructors may use symbols to report a student's standing in the semester's work. The symbol X is used to report a temporary delay of the final course grade; the X is converted to the symbol I in the circumstances described below. The symbol Q is used to indicate that the student officially dropped the course; the symbol W, to indicate that the student officially withdrew from the University; the symbol CR, to indicate that the student completed the course on the credit/no credit basis; and the symbol NC, to indicate that the student did not complete a credit/no credit course.

Incomplete grades. If a student does not complete all the assignments in a course before the end of the course, the instructor may report the symbol X (incomplete) to the registrar in place of a grade. The student must then complete the course requirements by the last class day in his or her next long-session semester of enrollment; the instructor must report a final grade by the end of the grade reporting period in that semester. If these deadlines are not met, the symbol X is converted to the symbol I (permanent incomplete). If the student is not enrolled during a long-session semester for twenty-four months following the end of the semester in which the X is reported, and the instructor does not report a final grade, then the symbol X is converted to the symbol I. The symbol I cannot be converted to a grade. When the symbol I is recorded, the symbol X also remains on the student's record.

The period for completion of course requirements may be extended only under unusual circumstances beyond the student's control and only upon the recommendation of the instructor and the approval of the graduate dean.

If a faculty member fails to report a grade for a student, the registrar enters the symbol X; an X is also entered for a student who is given the symbol CR by the instructor when the student is not registered for the course on the credit/no credit basis. In either case, the student should contact the instructor promptly so that a final grade may be reported to the registrar. If no final grade is reported, the symbol X is converted to the symbol I as described above.

A change in warning status caused by the conversion of an incomplete to a grade or by a change in grade is reflected only in the student's next grade report.

Credit/no credit. A student who wishes to take a course or courses on the credit/no credit basis should choose this option at the time of registration; registration on this basis must be approved by the student's graduate adviser. The student may not change the basis of registration in a course after the deadline given in the academic calendar. Dissertation, treatise, thesis, and report courses must be taken for a letter grade. Coursework requirements and methods of evaluation in a course must be the same for students registered on the credit/no credit basis as for those registered on the letter-grade basis. Performance at the level of C or above for an undergraduate or graduate course taken on the credit/no credit basis shall constitute a grade of credit (CR). Courses taken on the credit/no credit basis are not included when the grade point average is computed.

All rules affecting registration on the credit/no credit basis apply to all graduate students, even if the course involved is an undergraduate or law course.

Graduate students may not receive a grade of pass.

Withdrawal from the University

Dropping an entire course load constitutes withdrawal from the University for that semester.

To withdraw from the Graduate School, the student must file with the graduate dean a withdrawal petition, a form that also explains refund policies. The student may withdraw through the last class day of the semester. If the student abandons his or her courses without withdrawing, the instructor in each course determines what grade should be recorded.

Students in a warning status because of failure to maintain a grade point average of at least 3.00 may not withdraw without a petition from the graduate adviser and the approval of the graduate dean.



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Contents |  Chapter 1 |  Chapter 2 |  Chapter 3
Chapter 4 |  Chapter 5 |  Appendix


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Office of the Registrar
University of Texas at Austin

2 August 1999. Registrar's Web Team
Comments to rgcat@utxdp.dp.utexas.edu