UT Austin
Graduate Catalog
1999-2001



CONTENTS

CHAPTER 1
Graduate Study

CHAPTER 2
Admission and Registration

CHAPTER 3
Degree Requirements

CHAPTER 4
Fields of Study

CHAPTER 5
Members of Graduate Studies Committees

APPENDIX
Course Abbreviations
 

Chapter 4: Fields of Study

Asian Studies


Degrees Offered

Master of Arts (in Asian Studies)
Master of Arts (in Asian Cultures and Languages)
Doctor of Philosophy (in Asian Cultures and Languages)

The Center for Asian Studies administers the master's degree program in Asian studies. The Department of Asian Studies administers the master's and doctoral degree programs in Asian cultures and languages.


Facilities for Graduate Work

The Perry-Castaneda Library contains more than 200,000 volumes of Chinese, Hindi, Japanese, Pali, Prakrit, Sanskrit, and Urdu material related chiefly to the history, cultures, languages, and literatures of South and East Asia. The Undergraduate Library also has thousands of volumes in this area. In addition, the Benson Latin American Collection contains large holdings on the Japanese in Latin America; the Wasserman Public Affairs Library and the Population Research Center library also have significant holdings pertaining to Asia. The Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center has an extensive collection of works dealing with Asia. It also holds rare manuscripts and photographs. The Center for Asian Studies, in conjunction with the Department of Art and Art History, maintains a large and expanding slide collection for faculty and student use.


Areas of Study

The Center for Asian Studies offers the Master of Arts with a major in Asian studies, an interdisciplinary professional degree with a regional concentration on Asia. The degree is intended primarily for those preparing for a career in business, communications, government, law, library science, the military, or junior college teaching. There is considerable flexibility in meeting degree requirements. Each student, in consultation with the graduate adviser, designs an individual program within the framework described in the section Degree Requirements below.

The Department of Asian Studies offers the Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy degrees with a major in Asian cultures and languages. For these degrees students concentrate in Chinese, Hindi, Japanese, Malayalam, or Sanskrit.

With the approval of the graduate adviser and the graduate dean, students may design special programs that include courses outside the Department of Asian Studies that are related to the major area of study.

Graduate courses are offered regularly in Chinese, Hindi, Japanese, Malayalam, Sanskrit, and Tamil languages and literatures, and occasionally in Urdu and other Indo-Aryan languages. The study of these languages and literatures may also be included in programs leading to master's or doctoral degrees in other disciplines.


Graduate Studies Committees

The following faculty members served on Graduate Studies Committees in the spring semester 1998-1999.

Asian Cultures and Languages

Gordon A. Bennett
Avron A. Boretz
James Brow
Susan L. Burns
Sung-Sheng Yvonne Chang
Jeannette L. Faurot
Robert L. Hardgrave
Robert D. King
Richard W. Lariviere
Janice Leoshko
Patricia Maclachlan
Gail Minault
Rodney F. Moag
Susan Napier
John K. Nelson
J. Patrick Olivelle
Stephen H. Phillips
Edward J. M. Rhoads
Gregory Schopen
Andree F. Sjoberg
Stephen M. Slawek
Cynthia M. Talbot
Herman H. van Olphen
Kamala Visweswaran
Margherita Zanasi

Asian Studies

Gordon A. Bennett
Avron A. Boretz
Oscar G. Brockett
James Brow
Susan L. Burns
Sung-Sheng Yvonne Chang
Ozro Luke Davis Jr.
David J. Eaton
Toni L. Falbo
Jeannette L. Faurot
Kate Gillespie
Benjamin Gregg
Ian F. Hancock
Robert L. Hardgrave
Geraldine Heng
John Kappelman
Ward Keeler
Robert D. King
Judith Kroll
Lester R. Kurtz
Richard W. Lariviere
Gerlinde Leiding
Janice Leoshko
W. Roger Louis
Patricia Maclachlan
Gail Minault
Rodney F. Moag
Susan Napier
John K. Nelson
J. Patrick Olivelle
Stephen H. Phillips
Thomas W. Pullum
Edward J. M. Rhoads
James R. Roach
Gregory Schopen
Thomas K. Seung
Joel Sherzer
Nikhil Sinha
Andree F. Sjoberg
Stephen M. Slawek
Carlota S. Smith
Mark Southern
Cynthia M. Talbot
Herman H. van Olphen
Kamala Visweswaran
Margherita Zanasi


Admission Requirements

Master of Arts with a Major in Asian Studies

Students who plan to specialize in the study of China or Japan must have completed at least a year of college-level Chinese or Japanese with a grade of at least B, or must demonstrate equivalent competence, before admission to the program. Second-year college-level language coursework may be taken after admission but will not be counted toward the master's degree.

Students who plan to specialize in the study of South Asia are strongly encouraged but not required to have studied Hindi, Malayalam, Sanskrit, Tamil, or another South Asian language before applying for admission. First- and second-year college-level language coursework may be taken after admission but will not be counted toward the master's degree.

Ideally, applicants will also have completed some coursework in the desired area of specialization.

Master of Arts with a Major in Asian Cultures and Languages

This program is designed for students whose career objective is college or university teaching. Students who wish to specialize in China or Japan normally have a Bachelor of Arts in Chinese or Japanese language and literature or an area studies degree with a concentration in China or Japan. The applicant must also have demonstrated third-year-level language ability in Chinese or Japanese.

Students who wish to concentrate on South Asia normally have a Bachelor of Arts in area studies with a concentration on South Asia that includes significant language work in Hindi, Malayalam, Sanskrit, or Tamil. Applicants with bachelor's degrees in religious studies with a concentration in South Asia that includes significant language work have also been accepted into the program.

Doctor of Philosophy with a Major in Asian Cultures and Languages

Students who plan to specialize in China or Japan normally have a Master of Arts in Chinese or Japanese language and literature or an area studies degree with a concentration in China or Japan. The applicant must also have demonstrated ability to use Chinese or Japanese sources in research.

Students who wish to be admitted to the doctoral program with a concentration on South Asia should have a Master of Arts in area studies or a related discipline that includes significant coursework in a relevant South Asian language.


Degree Requirements

Master of Arts with a Major in Asian Studies

It is important to note that the principal language of a student's program may not be his or her native language.

Students may choose either the report option or the thesis option. The report option consists of at least thirty-three semester hours of work, including the report course, a three-hour, one-semester project in which the student writes a report on a given topic or body of material that he or she has researched. The thesis option consists of at least thirty semester hours of work, including the thesis course, a six-hour, two-semester project in which the student analyzes or interprets a body of material. Core courses required of all students in the program are six semester hours of upper-division or graduate coursework in history and six semester hours of upper-division or graduate coursework in a language of the area of specialization, normally Chinese, Hindi, Urdu, Japanese, Malayalam, Sanskrit, or Tamil. Another Asian language may be substituted with the approval of the graduate adviser. Students are expected to complete three years of language study or pass a proficiency examination in the Asian language of their choice to complete the degree program.

Students who have fulfilled the core requirements in history and language before admission to the program must substitute twelve additional hours of Asian studies coursework: the required subject matter is waived but not the hours. Up to nine hours of upper-division coursework, including no more than six hours in language, may be counted toward the degree.

Students who choose the thesis option must take at least twelve hours of designated electives related to the area of specialization, with no more than six hours in any one discipline. Students who choose the report option must take at least eighteen hours of such electives, with no more than nine hours in any one discipline. The minor of six hours normally consists of the required language courses. Students fluent in an Asian language upon admission may designate another six hours of supporting coursework for the minor.

Master of Arts with a Major in Asian Cultures and Languages

This program requires thirty semester hours of coursework, including six hours in the thesis course. Up to nine of the thirty hours may be in upper-division courses. Students must take at least three courses in their area of specialization--in Japanese culture, Indian religion, or Chinese literature, for example. They must also take one graduate course that introduces them to research methods of the appropriate discipline--for example, in historiography or literary theory or criticism--and another course on the general historical or cultural background of the major area. The remaining courses must be determined in consultation with the graduate adviser. The student must demonstrate reading proficiency in one modern language of scholarship in the specialization, such as French, German, or Japanese. Students planning doctoral study in Asian cultures and languages should begin the thesis course in their third semester.

Doctor of Philosophy with a Major in Asian Cultures and Languages

At least thirty semester hours of coursework are required beyond master's-degree work, in addition to six hours in the dissertation courses. The student must take courses in three areas. The first is the student's area of specialization; at least five courses must be taken in this area. The second area should be in a discipline different from that of the student's specialization. Three courses should be taken in the second
area. For the third area the student must take two courses in the methodology of the primary discipline (or disciplines, if recommended by the academic adviser). Areas must be approved by the adviser. Sample areas are listed in the program description of each of the three major areas (China, Japan, and South Asia) in the department.

To be admitted to candidacy for the doctoral degree, the student must take a comprehensive examination covering the three areas in which he or she has done coursework. The examination is usually taken one semester after completion of coursework. The examination committee consists of a chairman and three other members and includes at least one faculty member in each of the student's three areas. The reading list for the examination must include core items assigned by the committee. The comprehensive examination consists of two written and one oral test. Questions on the oral test may be based partially on the student's answers on the written tests.

After passing the comprehensive examination, the student, in consultation with the graduate adviser, selects five faculty members to form a dissertation committee; the chairman of the committee is the student's dissertation supervisor. The student then prepares a dissertation prospectus under the guidance of the chairman for submission to the committee. The committee reviews the prospectus at a prospectus hearing. Suggestions given at the hearing must be incorporated in the student's revision of the prospectus, which is resubmitted to the committee for approval. The student then drafts a shorter dissertation proposal based on the approved prospectus and submits it to the Graduate School as part of the application for admission to candidacy.

Competence is required in at least two foreign languages in addition to the language of the student's specialized area. The first must be a modern foreign language that will be used for research, such as French, German, or Japanese. The second may be either another research language or a second language in the broad area of the student's specialization that is pertinent to the student's professional development, such as classical Chinese for students specializing in modern China or Hindi or Malayalam for students in religious studies whose first major language is Sanskrit. The languages and the required level of proficiency are determined by the faculty in each area.


Joint Degree Programs

A student seeking admission to a joint degree program must apply through the Graduate and International Admissions Center. He or she must be accepted by each individual program in order to be admitted to the joint program. Like all other graduate applicants, the student is responsible for submitting any additional information required by the Graduate Studies Committee for each program.

Master of Arts/Master of Public Affairs

The Center for Asian Studies and the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs offer a joint degree program leading to the Master of Arts with a major in Asian studies and the Master of Public Affairs. The program combines advanced policy studies with interdisciplinary area studies, responding to an increased need in both the public and the private sector for policy specialists with a thorough understanding of Asian politics and cultures.

Students must complete at least sixty-nine semester hours in public affairs and Asian studies, including a professional report and summer internship. They are expected to show proficiency in an Asian language (Chinese, Japanese, Hindi, Malayalam, or, with special approval, another Asian language) equal to that shown by completion of three years of coursework.

Master of Arts/Master of Business Administration

This joint degree program is offered by the Graduate School of Business and the Center for Asian Studies. The program is designed to provide students with the skills and perspective necessary to work effectively in business, particularly in its application to Asia. Students pursue the Master of Business Administration and the Master of Arts with a major in Asian studies.

Upon admission to the program, the student must pay a nonrefundable enrollment deposit of $450 to indicate that he or she accepts the offer of admission. The deposit serves to confirm the student's intention of enrolling in both programs and is applied to the payment of fees when the student enrolls. Students who demonstrate financial need may qualify for assistance to cover the deposit.

Students must complete seventy-five to seventy-eight semester hours of coursework in business and Asian studies, including a thesis or professional report. In addition, they are expected to demonstrate proficiency in an Asian language (normally Chinese, Japanese, Hindi, or Malayalam) equal to that shown by completion of three years of coursework.


For More Information


Campus address: Will C. Hogg Building (WCH) 4.134, phone (512) 471-5811, fax (512) 471-4469

Mailing address: Graduate Program, Asian Studies, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712-1194

URL: http://asnic.utexas.edu/asnic/



Top of File   Graduate catalog
   


Asian studies courses: ANS
Chinese courses: CHI
Hindi courses: HIN
Japanese courses: JPN
Malayalam courses: MAL
Sanskrit courses: SAN

Contents |  Chapter 1 |  Chapter 2 |  Chapter 3
Chapter 4 |  Chapter 5 |  Appendix


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2 August 1999. Registrar's Web Team
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