UT Austin
Graduate Catalog
1999-2001



CONTENTS

CHAPTER 1
Graduate Study

CHAPTER 2
Admission and Registration

CHAPTER 3
Degree Requirements

CHAPTER 4
Fields of Study

CHAPTER 5
Members of Graduate Studies Committees

APPENDIX
Course Abbreviations
 

Chapter 4: Fields of Study

Nursing


DEGREES OFFERED

Master of Science in Nursing
Doctor of Philosophy

The Master of Science in Nursing degree program is fully accredited by the National League for Nursing.


FACILITIES FOR GRADUATE WORK

In addition to the extensive library and computer resources of the University, certain special resources within the School of Nursing provide support for graduate work.

The Research Office. The focus of this office is the promotion of funded research by nursing faculty members. The staff provides support and consultation services and compiles information about opportunities for research funding and presentations, including some for which graduate students are eligible. The computer laboratory is used for graduate courses and is available for graduate student research projects. The Research Office also provides employment opportunities for graduate students interested in experience as research assistants.

The Learning Center. The Learning Center includes an open-shelf audiovisual and reference library, a graphic and audiovisual production studio, clinical simulation laboratories for teaching psychomotor nursing skills, and a computer classroom and user facility equipped with Macintosh and IBM-compatible computers. Group study rooms and individual study carrels are available.

The Southwest Center for Nursing History. The archives of the Texas Nurses Association, the Texas League for Nursing, and the Texas Occupational Health Nurses' Association are housed here. The center also contains the personal papers of many notable Texas nurses, a photographic collection, and historic nursing textbooks.

The Continuing Education in Nursing Program. The program sponsors a variety of offerings each year. The Continuing Education Program is accredited by the American Nurses Association, and offerings are normally accepted by states that require continuing education for relicensure. Qualified graduate students may serve as consultants.

Clinical Research and Instructional Sites. The School of Nursing has access to a wide variety of community and state agencies and facilities for field research and instructional placement. These include all major health care facilities in Austin. Access to other facilities in central Texas and in other areas of the state can sometimes be arranged for individual students.


AREAS OF STUDY

Graduate work in the School of Nursing may lead to either the Master of Science in Nursing or the Doctor of Philosophy degree. The master's degree program is designed to give students the theoretical, analytical, and clinical knowledge needed for advanced nursing practice, administration, or community health nursing. Those preparing for advanced practice should choose either the clinical nurse specialist track, with a concentration in adult or parent-child nursing; or the nurse practitioner track, with a concentration in family or pediatric care. Students preparing for careers in midlevel management of health care facilities should choose the concentration in nursing systems. Students preparing for careers in community health and care of populations in the community should choose the concentration in community health nursing.

The doctoral degree program emphasizes the acquisition of a sound foundation in nursing science and research methods as a basis for developing nursing knowledge and scholarship in one of the four nursing concentrations--adult, community, and parent-child nursing and nursing systems. Graduates of the doctoral program typically enter positions in nursing education, research, or executive management of health care agencies. Some prepare to make contributions to the development of nursing theory or health policy.


GRADUATE STUDIES COMMITTEE

The following faculty members served on the Graduate Studies Committee in the spring semester 1998-1999.

P. Elizabeth Abel
Gayle J. Acton
Kay Avant
Sharon A. Brown
Linda J. Carpenter
Angela P. Clark
Doris D. Coward
Dorothy L. Gordon
Susan Grobe
Beverly A. Hall
Sharon D. Horner
David Kahn
Shirley C. Laffrey
Graham J. McDougall, Jr.
Joy H. Penticuff
Melanie S. Percy
Donna Lynn Rew
Bonnie L. Rickelman
Dolores Sands
Alexa K. Stuifbergen
Gayle M. Timmerman
Lorraine O. Walker


ADMISSION AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

Upon admission to any of the following programs, the student must pay a nonrefundable enrollment deposit of $200 to indicate that he or she accepts the offer of admission. The deposit is applied to the payment of fees when the student enrolls. Students who demonstrate financial need may qualify for assistance to cover the deposit.

Master of Science in Nursing

The entering student must hold a bachelor's degree from a program accredited by the National League for Nursing or the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education. Factors considered in the admission decision include satisfactory scores on the Graduate Record Examinations General Test, with attention to the relative balance between the verbal and quantitative scores; a grade point average of at least 3.00 in upper-division and graduate coursework; information derived from academic and professional references; professional background and goals; and proficiency in the English language. The composite picture presented by these factors is an important part of the admission review and decision.

The student is expected to complete an upper-division statistics course before admission or during the first semester of enrollment. Since all courses are not offered each semester, the student who waits to complete the statistics requirement after enrolling may find that his or her course sequence is altered. As a result, the student may need more time to complete the degree program. Before or at the time of enrollment, the student must meet the school's health requirements and must show evidence of physical assessment knowledge and skills, current licensure as a registered nurse in Texas, certification in cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and professional liability insurance.

The clinical nurse specialist and nurse practitioner tracks both require at least forty-eight semester hours of coursework. The concentrations in nursing systems and community health nursing require at least thirty-nine semester hours. Preparation of a thesis is optional; when this option is chosen, an additional three to six semester hours are required.

The program is organized into four components: (1) core courses that provide advanced theoretical and research knowledge and a deeper understanding of professional issues; (2) courses in the student's concentration; (3) support courses from outside nursing; and (4) electives.

Completion of the concentration in nursing systems, the concentration in community health nursing, or the clinical nurse specialist track with a concentration in adult health nursing provides the academic basis for national certification exams in the respective specializations. Completion of the nurse practitioner track with a concentration in family or pediatric care makes these graduates eligible for the national certification exams in their areas. (There is no national certification available for clinical nurse specialists in parent-child nursing, but graduates may be eligible to take certification exams in their specialty areas.)

Master of Science in Nursing: Alternate Entry

The alternate entry program is designed for people, including registered nurses, who are interested in providing health services and who hold at least a bachelor's degree in a discipline other than nursing. It is fully approved by the Texas Board of Nurse Examiners and is nationally accredited. Alternate-entry students may choose from concentrations in nursing systems, community health nursing, adulth health nursing, and parent-child nursing. Depending on the concentration they choose, students must complete a minimum of either seventy-seven or eighty-six semester hours of coursework.

Admission requirements include at least a bachelor's degree in a discipline other than nursing; satisfactory and relatively balanced verbal and quantitative scores on the Graduate Record Examinations General Test; a grade point average of at least 3.00 in upper-division and graduate coursework; satisfactory references; personal and professional goals compatible with the purpose of the program; and proficiency in the English language.

Prerequisite courses in the natural and behavioral sciences must be completed prior to enrollment. Before or at the time of enrollment, students must meet the school's health requirements and must provide evidence of certification in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and professional liability insurance.

Program components are (1) accelerated foundation courses in all major clinical areas of nursing; (2) core courses that provide advanced theoretical and research knowledge and a deeper understanding of professional issues; (3) courses in one of the nursing concentrations within the clinical nurse specialist track; (4) support courses from outside nursing; and (5) electives.

The alternate-entry student is eligible to take the licensure examination to become a registered nurse (NCLEX-RN) after completing the foundation courses. The student must be a registered nurse to enroll in concentration courses. The graduate who completes the concentration in nursing systems, the concentration in community health nursing, or the clinical nurse specialist track with a concentration in adult health nursing has the academic basis for the national clinical nurse specialist certification examination in the area of specialization. (There is no national certification available for clinical nurse specialists in parent-child nursing, but graduates may be eligible to take certification exams in their specialty areas.)

Doctor of Philosophy

The entering student must be a registered nurse who holds a master's degree in nursing from a program accredited by the National League for Nursing or the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education. The occasional student who holds a master's degree in another discipline will be required to complete prescribed graduate coursework in nursing as a condition of admission. Factors considered in the admission decision include satisfactory scores on the Graduate Record Examinations General Test, with attention to the relative balance between the verbal and quantitative scores; a grade point average of at least 3.00 in upper-division and graduate coursework; information derived from academic and professional references; professional background; congruence of the student's goals with the expertise of the nursing faculty; and proficiency in the English language. The composite picture presented by these factors is an important part of the admission review and decision.

The student is expected to complete an upper-division statistics course before admission or during the first semester of enrollment. In addition, the entering student takes a research placement examination to determine the appropriate sequence of nursing research courses. The student must pass a qualifying examination at about the end of the second year of study before entering candidacy for the degree.

The degree program requires completion of at least sixty-four semester hours of coursework beyond the master's degree. The coursework consists of (1) twenty-two hours in core courses focused on advanced theoretical, analytical, and research method skills; (2) thirty hours in the concentration the student has chosen, seminars, and related support courses; and (3) twelve hours in the dissertation courses.


JOINT DEGREE PROGRAM

Master of Science in Nursing/Master of Business Administration

The objective of this joint degree program is to prepare nurses with bachelor's degrees for leadership positions in the health care industry, particularly in hospital and community-based administration. Admission is open to students with undergraduate degrees in nursing. Applicants must take both the Graduate Record Examinations General Test and the Graduate Management Admissions Test. Prerequisite courses in college algebra, business calculus, and upper-division-level statistics are required.

A student seeking admission to the joint degree program must apply through the Graduate and International Admissions Center and the Graduate School of Business.
He or she must be accepted by both programs to be admitted to the joint program. Like all other graduate applicants, the student is responsible for submitting any additional information required by the Graduate Studies Committee for each program.

Upon admission to the joint degree program, the student must pay a nonrefundable enrollment deposit of $450 to indicate that he or she accepts the offer of admission. The deposit serves to confirm the student's intention of enrolling in both programs and is applied to the payment of fees when the student enrolls. Students who demonstrate financial need may qualify for assistance to cover the deposit.

The student must complete a total of at least seventy-two hours of coursework in the School of Nursing and the Graduate School of Business. This coursework consists of fifteen hours in nursing core courses, fifteen hours in the concentration in nursing systems, twenty-seven hours of required coursework in business, nine hours in business electives, and six hours in free electives.


LEGAL REQUIREMENTS

In the interest of public safety, there are legal restrictions on enrollment in some nursing courses and on eligibility for RN licensure. Clearance for criminal conviction is required before enrollment in psychiatric-mental health nursing courses. Licensure as a registered nurse is required to proceed beyond the foundation courses or to be employed as a professional nurse. Factors that may make an individual ineligible for licensure in Texas include prior denial of a license by a licensing authority; disciplinary action by a licensing/certifying authority; conviction for a crime other than a minor traffic violation; diagnosis/treatment/hospitalization in the past five years for schizophrenia or other psychotic disorders, major depression, bipolar disorder, paranoid personality disorder, antisocial personality disorder, or borderline personality disorder; addiction or treatment for addiction to alcohol or any other drug during the past five years.

To avoid delay in course enrollment, delay or denial of licensure, or possible disciplinary action and criminal prosecution for later discovery of falsified records, those with a history of any of the noted factors are strongly urged to apply for a determination of eligibility for licensure. Request for a determination should be made as early as possible before or upon enrolling in the nursing program. Such a determination, called a Declaratory Order, is issued by the Board of Nurse Examiners. For more information, send a written request for a Declaratory Order packet to the Board of Nurse Examiners for the State of Texas, Education Department, P O Box 140466, Austin, Texas 78714-0466. Issuance of a Declaratory Order may take nine months or more. Information obtained during the investigation phase of the petition process is confidential. Once issued, Declaratory Orders are subject to the Texas Open Records Act.


FOR MORE INFORMATION


Campus address: Nursing School (NUR) 2.104M, phone (512) 471-7927, fax (512) 232-4777

Mailing address: Graduate Program, School of Nursing, The University of Texas at Austin, 1700 Red River Street, Austin, Texas 78701-1499

E-mail: nugrad@mail.utexas.edu

URL: http://www.utexas.edu/nursing/



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Contents |  Chapter 1 |  Chapter 2 |  Chapter 3
Chapter 4 |  Chapter 5 |  Appendix


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University of Texas at Austin

2 August 1999. Registrar's Web Team
Comments to rgcat@utxdp.dp.utexas.edu