UT Law Catalog 1996-1998. Courses

The fields of inquiry in the following courses range from technical questions of little public interest to general ones of great social concern. In each course, one aim is to qualify the student as a strategist and an advocate, equipped with the knowledge, insight, and skills to serve clients through advice, negotiation, and planning, as well as by representing them in litigation. Another aim is to qualify the student as a responsible member of a profession that, throughout the history of this nation, has been prominent in the resolution of social, economic, and political problems and has been profoundly concerned with the public welfare. Hence, every law course focuses on the need for creative solutions to conflicts between individuals and between individuals and society. This is as it should be, for the function of law is to serve as a catalyst that makes community life possible and a better society attainable.

The faculty has approval to offer the following courses in the academic years 1996-1997 and 1997-1998; however, all courses are not taught each semester or summer session. Each spring the law school issues a manual of course descriptions and academic advice; law students should consult this manual before registering.

The first digit of a course number represents the value of the course in semester hours; for example, students taking Law 233 earn two semester hours of credit, while those taking Law 333 earn three semester hours. Unless otherwise indicated, each course meets for one semester, for one lecture hour a week for each semester hour of credit granted.

The dean and faculty of the School of Law may, from time to time, change the courses of instruction. Such changes may include a determination that a course formerly listed as a first-year course should be offered as an advanced course, or the reverse.

First-Year Courses

221, 321, 421, 621. Contracts.

Methods by which rights and duties of promissory and quasi-promissory origin are created, transferred, limited, discharged, breached, and enforced.

323. Criminal Law I.

Promulgation, interpretation, and administration of substantive laws of crime; constitutional limitations and relevant philosophical, sociological, and behavioral science materials.

227, 327, 527. Torts.

Limits of liability and methods of establishing liability for intentional and unintentional injuries to persons or property.

231, 331, 531. Property.

A survey of interests in land and limited topics involving chattels: estates, cotenancy, landlord and tenant issues, conveyancing, private and public control of land use.

132, 232, 332. Legal Research and Legal Writing.

Types of law books and their functions in research; practice in writing various kinds of legal material, designed to develop research technique and good style; preparation of a brief and delivery of an oral argument. The equivalent of one, two, or three lecture hours a week for one semester.

233, 333, 533. Civil Procedure.

Introduction to the civil adjudicative process, primarily that of the federal courts, including jurisdiction, pleading, dispositive motions, discovery, and trial procedure.

334, 434. Constitutional Law I.

For students who have completed at least one semester in the School of Law. Distribution of powers between federal and state governments; constitutional limitations on and judicial review of governmental action. Prerequisite: Ten semester hours of law.

Advanced Courses

223L, 323L, 423L. Criminal Law II.

Theory and content of complex criminal offenses, principally federal crimes. Prerequisite: Law 323.

230M, 330M, 430M. Real Estate Finance.

An advanced problems course dealing with acquisition, financing, development, and disposition of real estate. Prerequisite: Law 254K, 354K, 454K, or 554K. Law 231K, 331K, or 431K is recommended but not required.

231K, 331K, 431K. Real Estate Transactions.

Intermediate conveyancing course dealing with the transfer, finance, and development of real estate.

132C, 232C. Advanced Legal Research.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Offered on the pass/fail basis only. Law 132C, 232C and 179M, 279M (Topic: Legal Research [Advanced]) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: As announced for each topic.

Topic 1: Advanced Research: Foreign and International Law. Introduction to the sources and methods of research in foreign and international law, tailored to the needs of American lawyers.

Topic 2: Advanced Research: Texas Law. Introduction to the judicial, statutory, and administrative sources of Texas law. Topics include research in state administrative law and legislative histories. Both print and electronic resources are covered.

132D, 232D. Advanced Legal Writing.

Offered on the pass/fail basis only. Law 132D, 232D and 179M, 279M (Topic: Legal Writing [Advanced]) may not both be counted. A review of grammar, rhetorical techniques, organizational schemes, transitional devices, and persuasive language. Students focus on work completed in another course or in a clerkship.

232N. Editing for Editors.

Offered on the pass/fail basis only. Law 232N and 279M (Topic: Editing for Editors) may not both be counted. Weekly workshop in editing techniques for law review editors. Each week the class discusses a submission from one law review.

239, 339, 439. Jurisprudence.

Underlying problems in the functioning of a legal order; legal definition and justice as factors in decision making; discovery and interpretation of authority; rights and privileges of the person relative to society and government; conditions for imposing legal responsibility on a person; procedures for decision making; the relationship between law and the market in economic decision making.

240, 340. Family Law.

Legal problems related to the establishment, dissolution, and reorganization of family relationships, including marriage, divorce, annulment, alimony and child support, custody, and injuries to family relations. Prerequisite: Completion of first-year law courses.

240K, 340K, 440K. Education and the Law.

A study of the legal problems related to various aspects of education: financing; rights and duties of teachers, students, and administrators; authority of educational institutions and personnel; the relationship of the community to the school; and the role of federal and state governments.

240M, 340M, 440M. Antitrust: Economic Analysis and Legal Interpretation.

An examination of the business functions and competitive impact of practices that are subject to antitrust regulation to determine their legality under United States antitrust laws.

241J. Environmental Law: Technical Issues.

Law 241J and 279M (Topic: Environmental Technical Topics) may not both be counted. A survey of the scientific and technical aspects of environmental law, including chemistry, human physiology, toxicology, laboratory analysis methods, and risk assessment. A study of environmental control strategies and technologies for air and water pollution, groundwater protection, and hazardous waste management.

241L, 341L, 441L. Environmental Law.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: As announced for each topic.

Topic 1: Introduction, Air, Water, and Toxics. May not be counted by students with credit for Law 241L, 341L, or 441L received prior to 1994-1995. An introduction to pollution control, the common law antecedents, and early statutory developments, and an intensive study of the Clean Air Act and the Clean Water Act.

Topic 2: Hazardous Wastes and Enforcement. A study of enforcement issues, including citizens' suits. Examines the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (Superfund).

Topic 3: Environmental Law and Natural Resources. An introduction to environmental thinking in the context of scarce publicly and privately owned natural resources. Covers public trust doctrine, relevance of the Tenth Amendment to environmental protection, the National Endowment Policy Act, the Endangered Species Act, and the Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act.

241M, 341M, 441M. Mass Communication.

Regulation of broadcast media by the Federal Communications Commission; the constitutional and administrative law problems generated by regulation.

341S. Entertainment Industry Law.

Law 341S and 379M (Topic: Entertainment Law) may not both be counted. Overview of the legal problems that arise in film, theatre, television, music, and literary publishing. Issues common to all branches of the entertainment industry, like the right of publicity, copyright, and contractual protections. Prerequisite: Knowledge of business associations law is helpful but not required.

341T. Regulating Television.

Law 341N and 341T may not both be counted. Interplay among politics, economics, and administrative law as they affect decisions about who will be allowed to broadcast and what will be broadcast.

342L. Socialist versus Bourgeois Law.

Uses the legal systems of the Federal Republic of Germany and the German Democratic Republic as a basis for investigating the differences between socialist and bourgeois law.

242M, 342M, 442M. Bankruptcy.

Introduction to Title II of the United States Code and related state and federal laws: both liquidation and reorganization bankruptcy, including exemptions, discharge of debt, avoidance of powers of trustees, and rights of various classes of creditors; jurisdiction and procedure. Prerequisite: Law 180D, 280D, 380D, or 480D.

242N, 342N. Advanced Bankruptcy.

Law 242N, 342N and 279M, 379M (Topic: Bankruptcy [Advanced]) may not both be counted. Advanced bankruptcy issues frequently encountered in both complex and ordinary bankruptcy proceedings. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Law 242M, 342M, or 442M.

142R. Bankruptcy Workshop.

Representation of debtors and secured creditors in Chapter 11 bankruptcy. Further study and application of the basic concepts of business bankruptcy, with emphasis on structuring and drafting.

343C. United States Law and Legal Research, Introduction.

Law 343C and 379M (Topic: Introduction to United States Law and Legal Research) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Laws degree program.

243E, 343E. The Emergence of Modern European Law.

Law 243E, 343E and 279M, 379M (Topic: The Emergence of Modern European Law) may not both be counted. Historical and cultural development of modern European law on the Continent and in England. Differences between English and American laws.

243J, 343J. Introduction to Japanese Law.

Law 243J, 343J and 279M, 379M (Topic: Introduction to Japanese Law) may not both be counted. Introduction to the unique historical and contemporary development of the law and legal system of Japan. The legal culture of Japan; major areas of contemporary Japanese law.

343L. Latin American Law: Survey.

Law 343L and 379M (Topic: Latin American Law--Survey) may not both be counted. Short general and historical introduction, followed by presentation of the main common problems of Latin American countries, including the weakness of national integration and the role of the military in politics, and by a country-by-country survey, showing how these problems are manifest in constitutions and main laws of Latin America.

243T, 343T. American Torts from a European Perspective.

Law 243T, 343T and 279M, 379M (Topic: American Torts from a European Perspective) may not both be counted. In-depth analysis of some of the common problems and current methodology in American, German, and English modern tort laws. This is both an advanced torts and accident compensation course and an introduction to the comparative method.

344. International Business Transactions.

Problems confronting exporters, importers, and firms doing business abroad; emphasizes American and foreign tariff, antitrust, corporation, and arbitration law, and the European Union.

245, 345, 445. Products Liability.

Problems of preventing and compensating harm attributable to dangerous or defective products through regulation by government agencies, the judicial process, and market forces. Prerequisite: Law 227, 327, or 527.

245C, 345C. Texas Consumer Protection.

Law 245C, 345C and 279M, 379M (Topic: Texas Consumer Protection) may not both be counted. A brief overview of the primary common law causes of action available to purchasers of real property, goods, and services. Caselaw under the Texas Deceptive Trade Practices Act and Article 21.21 of the Texas Insurance Code.

245D. Consumer Protection (Deceptive Trade Practices Act).

Law 245D and 279M (Topic: Consumer Protection) may not both be counted. Overview of the primary common law causes of action available to purchasers of real property, goods, and services. Case law under the Texas Deceptive Trade Practices Act and Article 21.21 of the Texas Insurance Code.

346K. Contract Negotiation and Drafting.

An exploration, largely through simulated exercises, of the lawyer's role in the negotiation of transactions.

147. Basic Business and Financial Concepts.

Offered on the pass/fail basis only. May not be counted by students with credit for any of the following: Law 254K, 354K, 454K, 554K; 274K, 374K, 474K, 574K; more than six semester hours of undergraduate coursework in accounting; or more than three courses in economics or business. Brief introduction to basic business and financial concepts (such as financial statements, equity and debt financing, securities transactions) for students with little or no business background. Three lecture hours a week for one month.

248C, 348C, 448C. Civil Rights Litigation.

Law 248C, 348C, 448C and 279M, 379M, 479M (Topic: Civil Rights Litigation) may not both be counted. A basic introduction to the theory and practice of suing under state and federal statutory and constitutional law for redress of harm to one's civil rights by the government or its agents. The course balances the traditional approach of exposing students to litigation strategies with that of relating the rule of law to society.

249, 349, 449. Children and the Law.

Survey of important legal problems involving children and their relationships to their families and to the state (including the public education system).

350G. Intellectual Property, Introduction.

Law 350G and 379M (Topic: Introduction to Intellectual Property) may not both be counted. General overview of intellectual property law. Analysis of competing policies underlying intellectual property laws. Fundamentals of trade secrets, patent, copyright, and trademark law.

250H. Enforcement of Intellectual Property.

Law 250H and 279M (Topic: Enforcement of Intellectual Property) may not both be counted. Selected issues in the enforcement of intellectual property through litigation in federal and state courts and administrative tribunals; emphasis is on patent infringement litigation.

250K, 350K, 450K. Copyright and Unfair Competition.

May not be counted by students with credit for Law 250, 350, or 450. Literary and artistic property, the law related to trade identity, and other rules of the competitive game.

350M. Computer Law.

Law 350M and 379M (Topic: Computer Law) may not both be counted. Various forms of intellectual property protection as they have been applied to computers; emerging issues in the law of computer networks; antitrust issues in the computer industry. Prerequisite: Law 350G, 250K, 350K, 450K, 250P, 350P, or 450P.

250P, 350P, 450P. Patents and Trade Secrets.

Law 250P, 350P, 450P and 279M, 379M, 479M (Topic: Patents and Trade Secrets) may not both be counted. Survey of patent law, which is related to science and technology and concerns useful solutions to real problems. It concerns manufactured structures and substances and manufactured processes affecting structures and substances. Patents depend upon a federal statute; trade secrets are state law analogues of patents.

250R, 350R. Patent Litigation.

Law 250R, 350R and 279M, 379M (Topic: Patent Litigation) may not both be counted. Analysis of the case law and statutes governing patent enforcement, and comparison with the most recent decisions of the US Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit. Includes study of infringement and remedies. Prerequisite: One of the following is recommended but not required: Law 250P, 350P, 450P, 379M (Topic: Patents and Trade Secrets).

250T, 350T. Patent Prosecution Workshop.

Law 250T, 350T and 279M (Topic: Patent Prosecution Workshop) may not both be counted. An overview of the rules of practice before the Patent and Trademark Office, and an introduction to the practical considerations in preparing and prosecuting a patent application. Prerequisite: Law 250P, 350P, 450P, or 379M (Topic: Patents and Trade Secrets), or concurrent enrollment in Law 250R or 350R.

251C, 351C, 451C. History of American Law.

History of law in the United States, from the colonial period to the twentieth century.

251K, 351K. Criminal Procedure: Investigation.

Rules governing police conduct and the effect of these rules on admission of evidence; search and seizure, lineups, confessions, and similar matters.

252K, 352K, 452K. Texas Government.

The structure and process of Texas government, including constitutional, administrative, and local government law.

253L, 353L, 453L. Economic Analysis and the Common Law.

The allocative efficiency of various torts, contract, and property doctrines.

254, 354. Corporate Finance.

Advanced corporation law; topics include enterprise and securities valuation, capitalization, senior securities, distributions to shareholders, voluntary reorganizations, and business combinations. Prerequisite: Law 274K, 374K, 474K, or 574K.

254C, 354C. Tax and Business Strategy.

Law 254C, 354C and 279M (Topic: Tax and Business Strategy) may not both be counted. The effect of tax on business decisions. Prerequisite: Knowledge of algebra.

354J, 454J, 554J. Federal Income Taxation.

An overview of the federal income tax, mostly as it applies to individuals.

254K, 354K, 454K, 554K. Federal Income Taxation I.

Judicial and administrative treatment of federal income tax provisions; planning with reference to taxation. The equivalent of two, three, four, or five lecture hours a week for one semester.

254N, 354N. Federal Income Taxation A.

Only one of the following may be counted: Law 254N, 354N, 279M (Topic: Federal Income Taxation A). Taxation of personal income and some typical personal investments.

254P, 354P. Federal Income Taxation B.

Only one of the following may be counted: Law 254P, 354P, 279M (Topic: Federal Income Taxation B). Taxation of commercial investments and operations. Prerequisite: Law 254N, 354N, or the equivalent.

354Q. Partnership Tax.

Law 354Q and 379M (Topic: Partnership Tax) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Law 354J, 454J, or 554J. Law 274K, 374K, 474K, or 574K and a course in corporate income tax are recommended.

254R, 354R, 454R. Taxation of Corporations and Shareholders.

Only one of the following may be counted: Law 254R, 354R, 454R; 274M, 374M, 474M; 379M (Topic: Taxation of Corporations and Shareholders). The system of double taxation of C corporations, in which both the corporation and its shareholders are taxed on their earnings. Prerequisite: Law 354J, 454J, 554J, 254K, 354K, 454K, 554K, 254N, 354N, 254P, or 354P.

354S. Tax Controversy and Litigation.

Law 354S and 379M (Topic: Tax Controversy and Litigation) may not both be counted. Civil and criminal tax litigation. Prerequisite: Law 354J, 454J, or 554J; either 254N or 354N and 254P or 354P; an undergraduate course in tax, or related work experience.

255L, 355L, 455L. Higher Education and the Law.

Academic freedom and tenure; related constitutional issues; employment discrimination and collective bargaining in the university context.

256, 356, 456. Estate Planning.

Advanced problems in estate planning: marital deduction trusts; planning for community and separate property; inter vivos gifts and trusts; closely-held business interests; farm and ranch properties; income taxation of estates and trusts. Prerequisite: Law 254K, 354K, 454K, or 554K, and 289N, 389N, 489N, or 589N.

257, 357, 457. Marital Relationships and Divorce.

All aspects of divorce; premarital contracts, marriage, annulment, and ongoing family relationships.

258, 458. Legislative Processes.

The processes and functions of institutions involved in forming the legal fabric of society, and the interrelationships of these institutions.

258K, 358K, 458K. Labor Law in the Public Sector.

The labor and constitutional issues posed by collective bargaining in public employment.

258N. Texas Legislature: Process and Procedure.

Law 258N and 279M (Topic: Texas Legislature: Process and Procedure) may not both be counted. The ways the Texas Legislature works, both officially and otherwise. Consideration of a wide range of procedural and substantive topics, with emphasis on the regulation of citizen conduct through statute, rather than on the purely political aspects of the institution.

359C. Workers' Compensation.

The legal effects of work-related injuries and diseases in tort law, insurance law, and administrative law.

260K, 360K, 460K. Antitrust.

Federal and state law dealing with concerted action in unreasonable restraint of trade; monopolization; price discrimination, exclusive dealing arrangements, and other unfair competition; permissive resale price maintenance; mergers and joint ventures; limitations on the patent legal monopoly.

361, 461. Administrative Law.

Forms of law governing jurisdiction and procedure of state and federal agencies; right and scope of judicial review; relation of administrative agencies to legislature and chief executive.

361D. Administrative Practice.

Advanced specialty course. Sophisticated issues of administrative practice: legislative authorization, rulemaking, executive advice, and adjudication. Prerequisite: Law 252K, 352K, 452K, 361, or 461.

361E. Administrative Law, Texas.

Law 361E and 279M (Topic: Texas Administrative Law) may not both be counted. The law of and about administrative agencies; comparison between federal and Texas administrative law.

261J, 361J, 461J. Employment Law.

Law 261J, 361J, 461J and 379M (Topic: Employment Law) may not both be counted. An examination of legal doctrines governing employment relations outside the collective bargaining arena: development of the common law doctrine of at-will employment, the doctrine of free market control of employment, and problems raised by new employee rights including affirmative action, pregnancy disability, and comparable worth.

261K, 361K, 461K. Labor Law.

Collective bargaining and government intervention; functions of labor unions; settlement of labor disputes; rights of employees and of union members.

262L, 362L. Remedies I.

Compensatory, restitutionary, and exemplary damages for breach of contract or for injury of personal and property interests; injunctions and other equitable relief.

262N. Remedies II.

A sampling of advanced problems in remedies. Prerequisite: Law 262L or 362L.

263T, 363T, 463T. International Energy Transactions.

Law 263T, 363T, 463T and 279M, 379M, 479M (Topic: International Energy Transactions) may not both be counted. International business transactions in the energy and natural resource industries.

264C, 364C, 464C. Medicine and the Law.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Law 264C, 364C, 464C and 279M, 379M, 479M (Topic: Medicine and the Law) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: As announced for each topic.

Topic 1: Bioethics. Legal issues arising from the development of biomedical technologies that extend life and manipulate its creation. Law 264C focuses on death and dying and reproductive issues. Law 364C covers additional material on human experimentation and organ transplantation.

Topic 2: Regulation of the Health Care System. Medicine as an industry; the types of legal regulation that control the medical profession and regulate the health care system.

364G. Indian Law, Federal.

Law 364G and 379M (Topic: Indian Law) may not both be counted. Federal law governing Indian tribes and Indian people. Contemporary original tribal source material.

264S, 364S. Construction Law.

Law 264S, 364S and 279M (Topic: Construction Law) may not both be counted. Issues in general United States law that affect commercial and industrial construction, with emphasis on significant Texas cases. Overview of the construction process, examining roles of various parties, followed by consideration of the legal problems frequently encountered.

265, 365. Texas Procedure I.

Texas civil and criminal procedure to beginning of trial, including jurisdiction and venue, joinder of parties and actions, and res judicata. Prerequisite: Law 233, 333, or 533. The equivalent of two or three lecture hours a week for one semester.

265M, 365M. Land-Use Regulation.

Legal aspects of government programs for controlling land use, emphasizing urban problems.

267M, 367M, 467M. Estate and Gift Tax.

May not be counted by students with credit for Law 256, 356, or 456. Federal gift, estate, and generation-skipping taxes. Prerequisite: Law 289N, 389N, 489N, or 589N, and credit or registration for Law 254K, 354K, 454K, or 554K.

368C. Introduction to Mexican Law.

A general study of the Mexican legal system, including public, social, and private law.

268N, 368N, 468N. Employment Discrimination.

Issues related to the elimination of discrimination and the promotion of equality in employment.

269, 369, 469. Insurance.

Solicitation and sale of insurance; persons and interests protected by insurance; selection and control of risks; disposition of claims.

369R. Regulated Industries.

Law 369R and 379M (Topic: Regulated Industries) may not both be counted.

270J, 370J. Criminal Defense, Advanced.

Law 270J, 370J and 279M (Topic: Criminal Defense, Advanced) may not both be counted. The basics of criminal defense, from a practical perspective.

270M, 370M. Criminal Procedure: Prosecution.

The litigation of a criminal case, from the defendant's initial appearance in court through pretrial matters and the trial itself.

270N, 370N, 470N. Communications Torts.

An advanced torts course. Covers harm committed by means of communication rather than by physical acts, including defamation, invasion of privacy, and interference with commercial and familial relations. Prerequisite: Law 227, 327, or 527.

370P, 470P. Comparative Torts.

An advanced torts course studying problems in American tort law in light of the solutions in English, German, and French law.

370R. Torts, Advanced.

Law 370R and 379M (Topic: Torts II) may not both be counted. Issues that arise in a sophisticated tort practice. Personal injury litigation is considered from both the plaintiff's and the defense's viewpoint.

371G. Constitutional and International Law.

Law 371G and 379M (Topic: Constitutional and International Law) may not both be counted. The relationship between constitutional and international law: the origin of the latter in the former, the historical succession of constitutional archetypes that arose because of international conflict, and the future of international law as its constitutional basis changes.

371K, 471K. International Law.

Legal organization of the international community; sources of and modes of applying international law; jurisdiction and treatment of nationals and aliens; extradition; war and peace.

271M, 371M, 471M. Accounting for Lawyers.

Introduction to the theory of financial accounting and its numerous applications to the practice of law.

271N, 371N, 471N. National Security Law.

Survey of topics relating law and security: strategic arms and arms control, economic sanctions, intelligence. Prerequisite: Completion of first-year law courses.

371P. Economics and National Security Policies.

Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Law 371P and 379M (Topic 1: Economics and National Security Policies) may not both be counted. The art and science of economic and national security policy-making, including the selection of policymakers, and the theory, implications, and consequences of policy decisions.

274K, 374K, 474K, 574K. Business Associations.

Basic course in the organization, management, financing, and dissolution of business associations and their creditors. Although some attention is given to agency principles governing the representation of business associations and to partnership law, emphasis is on the business corporation with particular attention to the problems of the closed corporation.

274M, 374M, 474M. Taxation of Business Organizations.

Advanced course covering federal income taxation of units of business enterprise, partnerships, partners, corporations, and shareholders in the formation, operation, reorganization, and liquidation of such units. Prerequisite: Law 254K, 354K, 454K, or 554K. Law 274K, 374K, 474K, or 574K is recommended.

274N, 374N, 474N. Taxation of Natural Resources.

Special application of the federal income tax to oil, gas, and solid mineral extractive industries. Prerequisite: Law 254K, 354K, 454K, or 554K.

274R, 374R, 474R. International Tax.

Law 274R, 374R, 474R and 279M, 379M (Topic: International Tax) may not both be counted. Overview of ways the United States taxes (1) nonresident aliens and foreign corporations on income from United States sources and (2) United States persons and corporations on income received from international sources. Prerequisite: Law 254K, 354K, 454K, 554K, 254N, or 354N.

376C. Texas Civil Procedure: Pretrial.

Law 376C and 379M (Topic: Texas Civil Procedure: Pretrial) may not both be counted. Pretrial preparation for litigation in Texas courts. The litigation process from inception to the days immediately before trial.

376D. Texas Civil Procedure: Trial and Appeal.

Law 376D and 379M (Topic: Texas Civil Procedure: Trial and Appeal) may not both be counted. Trials and appeals in Texas courts, from the days immediately before trial through the appellate process.

376F. Legal Process.

Law 376F and 379M (Topic: Legal Process) may not both be counted. The institutional and jurisprudential consequences of legal rules; the application of legal-process approaches to problems of private and public law.

476G. Trial Tactics.

Only one of the following may be counted: Law 476G, 176N, 276N, 376N, 476N, 276Q. An intensive trial advocacy course covering all aspects of trial.

276K, 376K. Texas Procedure II.

Texas civil and criminal procedure from beginning of trial to end of appellate process; original proceedings in appellate courts. Prerequisite: Law 233, 333, or 533. The equivalent of two or three lecture hours a week for one semester.

276L, 376L. Water Law.

Judicial, legislative, and administrative problems in water resources development, allocation, and control.

276M, 376M, 476M. Trial Advocacy: Principles.

A graded course in which the principles of advocacy skills are taught--to be combined with a practice course culminating in a mock jury trial.

176N, 276N, 376N, 476N. Trial Advocacy: Practice Skills.

Offered on the pass/fail basis only. Only one of the following may be counted: Law 476G, 176N, 276N, 376N, 476N, 276Q. A practical skills course culminating in a mock jury trial--to be taken with a graded section in which the principles of advocacy skills are taught. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Law 276M, 376M, or 476M.

276P, 376P, 476P. Texas Civil Procedure: Survey.

Some sections are offered on the pass/fail basis only; these are announced before registration. May not be counted by students with credit for Law 265, 365, 276K, or 376K. Overview of Texas courts and Texas civil procedure (pretrial, trial, and appeal).

276Q. Intensive Trial Advocacy Program.

Only one of the following may be counted: Law 476G, 176N, 276N, 376N, 476N, 276Q. Law 276Q and 279M (Topic: Intensive Trial Advocacy) may not both be counted. The effect of federal and state rules of evidence on trial tactics. Litigation ethics and ways to combat unethical behavior by opponents.

376R. Texas Civil Procedure for Litigators.

Offered on the pass/fail basis only. The most advanced and specialized course in Texas civil procedure, emphasizing the practitioner's role in pleading, discovery, preservation of error, charge preparation, and appeals. Prerequisite: Law 276P, 376P, or 476P.

276S, 376S, 476S, 576S. Civil Litigation, Advanced.

An advanced course encompassing the principles and skills of trial advocacy and civil procedure; pretrial discovery and motion practice, alternative dispute resolution, jury trial, and appeal. Prerequisite: Law 265 or 365; 276K or 376K; 276M, 376M, or 476M; and 176N, 276N, 376N, or 476N.

277, 377, 477. Admiralty Law.

A survey of the law applicable to the business of using the oceans and other navigable waters to transport people, goods, and materials; and to the related business of exploring for oil and gas beneath those waters.

377D. Maritime Injuries Litigation: Advanced Specialty Course.

Law 377D and 379M (Topic: Maritime Injuries Litigation) may not both be counted. A review of recent important decisions dealing with the rights of maritime workers, harbor workers, and others injured under circumstances of potential admiralty jurisdiction. Prerequisite: Law 277, 377, or 477.

278K, 378K, 478K. Marital Property Rights.

Property rights of husband and wife; the Texas community property system; homestead. Prerequisite: Law 231, 331, or 531.

278N, 378N, 478N. Texas Criminal Procedure: Pretrial.

The statutory law and appellate case law related to pretrial criminal court procedure in Texas. Prerequisite: A course in criminal procedure.

378P, 478P. Texas Criminal Procedure: Trial and Beyond.

The statutory law and appellate case law related to criminal court procedure--trial and beyond--in Texas. Prerequisite: A course in criminal procedure.

179M, 279M, 379M, 479M, 579M, 679M. Contemporary Legal Developments.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Topics to be announced. Prerequisite: As announced for each topic.

Topic 2: Trial Advocacy Skills.

280C, 380C, 480C. Payment Systems.

Covers Articles 3, 4, 5, and 7 of the Uniform Commercial Code. Deals primarily with payment systems.

180D, 280D, 380D, 480D. Secured Credit.

Credit transactions in which the creditor by contract obtains a lien on personal property--Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code. It is recommended that students take Law 280C, 380C, or 480C before this course.

180E. Payment Systems.

Law 380C and 180E may not both be counted. Articles 3, 5, and 7 of the Uniform Commercial Code, related aspects of federal law, and some international sources of law.

181C, 281C, 381C, 481C. Constitutional Law II.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Emphasis on First Amendment rights, due process, and equal protection; or other topics as announced. Prerequisite: Law 334 or 434; additional prerequisites announced with topics.

381R. Alternative Dispute Resolution.

Advanced specialty course. Negotiation, mediation, arbitration, minitrial, and other means of resolving disputes short of full litigation.

281S, 381S. Mediation.

Law 379M (Topic: Mediation) and 281S, 381S may not both be counted. Skills and techniques needed for effective negotiation and mediation.

282, 382, 482. Conflict of Laws.

Treatment of claims concerning breach of contract, tortious injury of person or property, ownership of land or chattels, and status, where the claims involve facts foreign to the adjudicating state; jurisdiction and enforcement of foreign judgments.

282C, 382C. Immigration and Citizenship.

Admission, exclusion, and deportation of aliens; native-born, derivative, and naturalized citizenship.

382D. International Trade.

Law 379M (Topic: International Trade) and 382D may not both be counted. Legal principles and processes that affect both private and governmental decisions about international economic relations.

382E. International Law and Foreign Investment.

Law 379M (Topic: International Law and Foreign Investment) may not both be counted. The international community's regulation of foreign investment. Primary focus on United States investment in other countries, with some attention to foreign investment in the United States. Prerequisite: A course in international law is recommended but not required.

382F. International Petroleum Transactions.

Law 379M (Topic: International Petroleum Transactions) and 382F may not both be counted. International petroleum transactions in the context of a single industry: the various participants and the transactions that take place at each stage of the industry, from acquisition of development rights through exploration and production to transportation and marketing.

282N, 382N, 482N. Comparative Law.

Nature and functions of the comparative study of law; study in detail of history, territorial expansion, and basic features of the civil law.

282P, 382P, 482P. Complex Litigation.

Advanced civil procedure course dealing with multiparty and complex cases, including problems in litigation context. Prerequisite: Law 233, 333, or 533.

382R. International Litigation.

Special problems of civil litigation when one or both parties are nonresident aliens, or the facts have significant international contacts, or both.

283, 383, 483. Evidence.

Principles and rules governing admissibility and relevance of evidence in trial courts; qualification, privileges, and examination of witnesses; burden of proof and presumptions.

284C. Corporate and Securities Law and Transactions.

Law 279M (Topic: Corporation Law, Finance, and Securities) and 284C may not both be counted. Aspects of corporate and securities law not covered in Law 274K, 374K, 474K, 574K. Legal as well as business and economic factors and considerations, with emphasis on corporate and securities transactions.

384D. Corporation Law, Finance, Securities, and Reorganizations.

Law 379M (Topic: Corporation Law, Finance, Securities, and Reorganizations) and 384D may not both be counted. Examination of areas of corporation law not covered or covered briefly in Law 274K, 374K, 474K, 574K. Topics include the nature and theory of the firm and valuation of the firm and its securities. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Law 274K, 374K, 474K, or 574K.

284N, 384N, 484N. Securities Regulation.

Federal and state regulation of the distribution of, and trading in, securities, with particular emphasis on problems of coverage and administration of the Securities Act of 1933, the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934, and the Investment Company Act of 1940. Prerequisite: Law 274K, 374K, 474K, or 574K.

184S, 284S. Securities Regulation Workshop.

Regulations on federal and state securities laws; the use of such regulations and related documentation to effect securities transactions. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Law 284N, 384N, or 484N.

285, 385. Professional Responsibility.

The lawyer's responsibility in making and administering the law; the codes of ethics and problems of professional conduct.

286, 386, 486. Federal Courts.

Law 279M, 379M, 479M (Topic: Federal Courts) and 286, 386, 486 may not both be counted. Jurisdiction, venue, and procedure in federal trial and appellate courts; relationship between federal and state courts; remedies against government and against state and federal officers.

286C, 386C. Federal Courts I.

Supreme Court cases on the two-law system in both sets of courts. Judicial power to fashion federal common law, including new federal causes of action; doctrines of supremacy, preemption, and federalization; interpretation of federal law.

286D, 386D. Federal Courts II.

Current and classic Supreme Court cases on the two-court system and American judicial power. Problems of separation of powers and federalism. Acute conflicts of jurisdiction. Federal judicial interference with state government.

389D. Demography and the Law.

Same as Sociology 389K (Topic 7: Law and Demography). Legal issues in which statistical and demographic data (especially censuses and surveys) are used as evidence.

389G. Gender and the Law.

Law 379M (Topic: Gender and the Law) and 389G may not both be counted. Examination and evaluation of the role of law in maintaining a gendered society. Case readings, examination of statutes, and readings that provide different perspectives brought to this and related questions by feminist theory.

289N, 389N, 489N, 589N. Wills and Estates.

Execution, revocation, and interpretation of wills; future interests, particularly those involved in testamentary trusts; perpetuities; powers of appointment. Prerequisite: Law 231, 331, or 531.

389P. Legal Scholarship.

Law 379M (Topic: Legal Scholarship) and 389P may not both be counted. The genres of legal scholarship, including jurisprudence, traditional legal analysis, law and economics, sociology of law, and legal history.

289S, 389S, 489S. Sociology of Law.

Sociological theories and research about law and legal institutions.

190, 290, 390. Oil and Gas.

Creation and transfer of interests in oil and gas; mutual obligations of parties to a mineral lease; correlative obligations of neighboring mineral owners; regulation of production.

190C, 290C. Oil and Gas Workshop.

An optional course to be taken in conjunction with Law 390 by students who wish to become familiar with the types of problems commonly encountered by oil and gas practitioners. Instruments used in oil and gas transactions are emphasized. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Law 390.

294L, 394L, 494L. Local Government Law.

State constitutional law concerning intergovernmental relations and the organization and administration of local government; ad valorem and other taxes; finance, lawmaking, personnel, contracts, and tort liability.

296K, 396K. Legislation.

Roles of persons, institutions, courts, administrative agencies, and legislatures in lawmaking; interpretation of legislation; decision making and legal advocacy in the legislative process; drafting of legislation.

197C, 297C, 397C, 497C, 597C. Clinical Program.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Offered on the pass/fail basis only. Practical experience in different areas of law. Topics to be announced. Prerequisite: As announced for each topic.

197D, 297D, 397D, 497D, 597D. Clinical Program: Practice Skills.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Offered on the pass/fail basis only. Practical experience in different areas of the law. Topics to be announced. Prerequisite: As announced for each topic. Fieldwork to be arranged.

197J, 297J, 397J, 497J. Judicial Internship Program.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Offered on the pass/fail basis only. Internship under the supervision of an individual Texas judge or justice. Prerequisite: As announced for each topic. Internship hours to be arranged.

697T. Thesis.

Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy for the master's degree. Conference course.

Research and Seminar Courses

447K, 547K, 647K. Capstone Seminar.

A course transcending doctrinal boundaries that emphasizes problem solving and drafting of legal documents. Prerequisite: Completion of first-year law courses and consent of instructor.

197L, 297L, 397L, 497L. Individual Research.

Offered on the pass/fail basis only. For advanced students. Individual research conducted under standards promulgated by the dean. The completed work must be approved by the supervising faculty member. Prerequisite: Approval of research project by the supervising faculty member and by the associate dean for academic affairs. Independent study.

297N, 397N, 497N. Law Seminar: Nonwriting.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Some sections are offered on the pass/fail basis only; these are announced before registration. Different sections explore different areas of the law in depth.

297S, 397S, 497S. Law Seminar.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Different sections explore different areas of the law in depth.

197U, 297U, 397U. Individual Research (Clinic).

Offered on the pass/fail basis only. For advanced clinical students. Basic clinical course, to be completed under standards promulgated by the dean. The completed work must be approved by the supervising faculty member. Prerequisite: Law 197C, 297C, 397C, 497C, or 597C, and approval of a faculty member regularly engaged in clinical legal education and of the associate dean for academic affairs. Independent study.

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