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CONTENTS

CHAPTER 1
The University

CHAPTER 2
School of Architecture

CHAPTER 3
Red McCombs
School of Business


CHAPTER 4
College of Communication

CHAPTER 5
College of Education

CHAPTER 6
College of Engineering

CHAPTER 7
College of Fine Arts

CHAPTER 8
College of Liberal Arts

CHAPTER 9
College of
Natural Sciences


CHAPTER 10
School of Nursing

CHAPTER 11
College of Pharmacy

CHAPTER 12
School of Social Work

CHAPTER 13
The Faculty

Texas Common Course Numbering System
(Appendix A)

APPENDIX B
Degree and Course Abbreviations



     CHAPTER SIX CONTENTS
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Engineering


continued


Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering

Chemical engineering is one of the most broadly based engineering disciplines. Its field of practice covers the development, design, and control of processes and products that involve molecular change and the operation of such processes. Since many of the products that sustain and improve life are produced by carefully designed and controlled molecular changes, the chemical engineer serves in a wide variety of industries. These industries range from chemical and energy companies to producers of all types of consumer and specialty products, pharmaceuticals, textiles, and polymers. In recent years, the scope of chemical engineering has been further broadened as discoveries in molecular biology, specialized polymers, and solid-state devices are adapted to commercial use.

Careers are available in industry, government, consulting, and education. Areas of professional work include research and development, operations, technical service, plant design, market analysis and development, process control, and pollution abatement.

The objective of the chemical engineering degree program is to prepare students for leadership positions in chemically related careers after they earn either the bachelor's degree or an advanced degree. This preparation requires that students develop the basis for a lifetime of continued learning and self-improvement and form a deep appreciation of the relationships among basic knowledge, technological advance, and human need. To meet the program's objective, the faculty has designed a rigorous, demanding, state-of-the-art curriculum that integrates lectures and laboratory experience in basic science, mathematics, engineering science, engineering design, and the liberal arts.

Curriculum

Course requirements are divided into three categories: basic sequence courses, major sequence courses, and other required courses. Enrollment in major sequence courses is restricted to students who have received credit for all of the basic sequence courses and have been admitted to the major sequence by the College of Engineering Admissions Committee. (Requirements for admission to a major sequence are given in this chapter.) Enrollment in other required courses is not restricted by completion of the basic sequence.

Courses used to fulfill technical and nontechnical elective requirements must be approved by the chemical engineering faculty before the student enrolls in them. Courses that fulfill the social science and fine arts/humanities requirements are listed in this chapter.

Courses Semester Hours

Basic Sequence Courses
Chemical Engineering 317, Chemistry 302, 204, 618A, 118K, Mathematics 408C, 408D, 427K, Mechanical Engineering 210, Physics 303K, 303L, 103M, 103N, Rhetoric and Composition 30637

Major Sequence Courses
Chemical Engineering 322, 333T, 448, 350, 353, 353M, 354, 360, 363, 264, 372, 473K 37
Approved area electives in chemical engineering 6

Other Required Courses
Chemistry 618B, 118L, 353, 153K,
Electrical Engineering 331 or 331K [2],
Engineering Mechanics 314 or 306, English 316K
17
Chemistry elective chosen from Chemistry 431, 354 and 154K, 354L and 154K, 455 4
Approved advanced mathematics, physics, chemistry, or biology elective 3
American government, including Texas government 6
American history 6
Approved fine arts or humanities elective 3
Approved social science elective 3
Approved area electives 6

Minimum Required 128

Honors Program

Chemical engineering students who maintain a grade point average of at least 3.50 may take the honors research course, Chemical Engineering 679H. In this course the student performs research over two consecutive semesters under the supervision of a faculty member, makes two oral presentations, and writes a thesis. Chemical Engineering 679H may be used to fulfill either the approved area electives requirement or the approved area electives in chemical engineering requirement.

Technical Area Options

Because of the broad training received by the chemical engineer in natural sciences and engineering, opportunities are provided for students also to develop particular talents and interests in one or two areas of emphasis. Each student must complete twelve semester hours in one of the following areas or six semester hours in each of two areas, including at least two chemical engineering courses. The technical area courses should be selected in consultation with a faculty adviser and must be approved by the department chairman. The courses listed in each area do not constitute an exclusive list of area courses but illustrate the types of courses that are generally suitable for a given area.

Students with a grade point average of at least 3.00 who are interested in seeking an advanced degree in chemical engineering are encouraged to discuss their plans with the graduate adviser or another faculty member. These students are encouraged to take at least one advanced mathematics course among their electives. They should also inquire about undergraduate research positions in the department.

For all areas, Chemical Engineering 325L and 377K may be counted as chemical engineering electives only with the approval of the student's academic adviser. Chemical Engineering 377K may be counted only once toward the degree.

Area I, Process Analysis and Control

The chemical process industry is one of the most advanced in the applications of modern control techniques and computer technology. These rapidly developing techniques are of great utility to the practicing engineer.

Chemical Engineering 342, Chemical Engineering Economics and Business Analysis
Chemical Engineering 356, Optimization: Theory and Practice
Chemical Engineering 376K, Process Evaluation and Quality Control
Electrical Engineering 370K, Computer Control Systems
Electrical Engineering 379K, Topic: Statistical Quality Control
Mechanical Engineering 335, Probability and Statistics for Engineers
Mechanical Engineering 348D, Introduction to Mechatronics II
Mechanical Engineering 366L, Operations Research Models
Upper-division mathematics course

Area II, Polymer Engineering

Polymers and related special products make possible many of the conveniences of modern life. Chemical engineers continue to be major contributors in this area.

Chemical Engineering 355, Introduction to Polymer Engineering
Chemical Engineering 356, Optimization: Theory and Practice
Chemical Engineering 363K, Polymer Processing
Chemical Engineering 376K, Process Evaluation and Quality Control
Chemistry 367L, Macromolecular Chemistry

Area III, Electronic Materials Engineering

Electronic equipment of all types requires devices produced by carefully controlled chemical processes. Chemical engineers can assume a creative role in this technology when provided with the appropriate fundamentals and applications background.

Chemical Engineering 323, Chemical Engineering for Microelectronics
Chemical Engineering 355, Introduction to Polymer Engineering
Chemical Engineering 357, Technology and Its Impact on the Environment
Chemical Engineering 363K, Polymer Processing
Chemical Engineering 376K, Process Evaluation and Quality Control
Chemistry 431, Inorganic Chemistry
Chemistry 455, Fundamentals of Analytical Chemistry
Electrical Engineering 339, Solid-State Electronic Devices

Area IV, Environmental Engineering

Chemical engineers are uniquely qualified to contribute to the solution of environmental problems and to design processes and products that minimize environmental hazards.

Biology 211, Introductory Biology: Cell Biology
Biology 212, Introductory Biology: Genetics and Evolution
Biology 213, Introductory Biology: Diversity and Ecology
Biology 214, Introductory Biology: Structure and Function of Organisms
Biology 226R, General Microbiology: Microbial Cell Structure and Genetics
Biology 226S, General Microbiology: Microbial Physiology and Ecology
Biology 339, Metabolism and Biochemistry of Microorganisms
Chemical Engineering 339, Introduction to Biochemical Engineering
Chemical Engineering 341, Design for Environment
Chemical Engineering 357, Technology and Its Impact on the Environment
Chemical Engineering 376K, Process Evaluation and Quality Control
Civil Engineering 341, Introduction to Environmental Engineering
Civil Engineering 342, Water and Wastewater Treatment Engineering
Civil Engineering 346K, Hazardous Waste Management
Civil Engineering 364, Design of Wastewater and Water Treatment Facilities
Civil Engineering 369L, Air Pollution Engineering
Civil Engineering 370K, Environmental Sampling and Analysis

Area V, Process Engineering

The design and operation of processes is a major function of chemical engineers that is essential to any successful product. Competence in design, economics, fault detection, optimization, control, and simulation is essential.

Architectural Engineering 323K, Project Management and Economics
Chemical Engineering 340, Product and Process Development
Chemical Engineering 341, Design for Environment
Chemical Engineering 342, Chemical Engineering Economics and Business Analysis
Chemical Engineering 355, Introduction to Polymer Engineering
Chemical Engineering 356, Optimization: Theory and Practice
Chemical Engineering 357, Technology and Its Impact on the Environment
Chemical Engineering 363K, Polymer Processing
Chemical Engineering 376K, Process Evaluation and Quality Control
Mechanical Engineering 335, Probability and Statistics for Engineers
Mechanical Engineering 353, Engineering Economic Analysis

Area VI, Product Engineering

Chemical engineers are frequently involved in the development of new consumer and specialty products, an assignment that requires not only technical skills but also an understanding of the principles of successful marketing and quality control.

Chemical Engineering 340, Product and Process Development
Chemical Engineering 341, Design for Environment
Chemical Engineering 342, Chemical Engineering Economics and Business Analysis
Chemical Engineering 355, Introduction to Polymer Engineering
Chemical Engineering 357, Technology and Its Impact on the Environment
Chemical Engineering 363K, Polymer Processing
Chemical Engineering 376K, Process Evaluation and Quality Control
International Business 378, International Business Operations
Marketing 320F, Foundations of Marketing
Marketing 460, Information and Analysis
Mechanical Engineering 335, Probability and Statistics for Engineers
Mechanical Engineering 353, Engineering Economic Analysis

Area VII, Biomedical Engineering and Premedical/Predental Program

The biomedical option is designed for students who have an interest in the life sciences in addition to the physical sciences, mathematics, and engineering. Courses included under this plan are applicable to the entrance requirements for most medical schools, dental schools, and graduate programs in biomedical engineering. For additional information, see the departmental biomedical adviser.

Biology 211, Introductory Biology: Cell Biology, and 212, Introductory Biology: Genetics and Evolution
Biology 213, Introductory Biology: Diversity and Ecology, and 214, Introductory Biology: Structure and Function of Organisms
Biology 320, Cell Biology
Biology 325, Genetics
Biology 226R, General Microbiology: Microbial Cell Structure and Genetics, and 226S, General Microbiology: Microbial Physiology and Ecology
Biology 365R, Vertebrate Physiology I
Biology 365S, Vertebrate Physiology II
Chemical Engineering 339, Introduction to Biochemical Engineering
Chemical Engineering 355, Introduction to Polymer Engineering
Chemical Engineering 376K, Process Evaluation and Quality Control
Chemical Engineering 379, Topic: Cell and Tissue Engineering
Chemistry 339K, Biochemistry I
Electrical Engineering 374K, Biomedical Electronics
Mechanical Engineering 354, Biomedical Engineering

Area VIII, Biotechnology

The discoveries in the biological sciences that placed large areas of these sciences on a molecular basis provide great potential for new products to improve living standards and health. Those with proper training in the basics of chemical engineering and in application techniques will make major contributions to commercial development of such products.

Biology 211, Introductory Biology: Cell Biology, and 212, Introductory Biology: Genetics and Evolution
Biology 213, Introductory Biology: Diversity and Ecology, and 214, Introductory Biology: Structure and Function of Organisms
Biology 325, Genetics
Biology 226R, General Microbiology: Microbial Cell Structure and Genetics, and 226S, General Microbiology: Microbial Physiology and Ecology
Chemical Engineering 339, Introduction to Biochemical Engineering
Chemical Engineering 355, Introduction to Polymer Engineering
Chemical Engineering 357, Technology and Its Impact on the Environment
Chemical Engineering 376K, Process Evaluation and Quality Control
Chemical Engineering 379, Topic: Cell and Tissue Engineering
Chemistry 339K, Biochemistry I
Chemistry 339L, Biochemistry II
Chemistry 370, Physical Methods for Biochemistry

Suggested Arrangement of Courses

First Year--Fall Semester

Courses Semester Hours

CH 302, Principles of Chemistry II 3
CHE 102, Introduction to Chemical Engineering[3] 1
M 408C, Differential and Integral Calculus 4
M E 210, Engineering Design Graphics 2
RHE 306, Rhetoric and Composition 3
Social science or fine arts/humanities elective 3
Total 15 or 16 [3]
First Year--Spring Semester

Courses Semester Hours

CH 204, Introduction to Chemical Practice 2
M 408D, Sequences, Series, and Multivariable Calculus 4
PHY 303K, Engineering Physics I 3
PHY 103M, Laboratory for Physics 303K 1
American government 3
Social science or fine arts/humanities elective 3
Total 16
Second Year--Fall Semester

Courses Semester Hours

CH 618A, Organic Chemistry 3
CH 118K, Organic Chemistry Laboratory 1
CHE 317, Introduction to Chemical Engineering Analysis 3
M 427K, Advanced Calculus for Applications I 4
PHY 303L, Engineering Physics II 3
PHY 103N, Laboratory for Physics 303L 1
Total 15
Second Year--Spring Semester

Courses Semester Hours

CH 618B, Organic Chemistry 3
CH 118L, Organic Chemistry Laboratory 1
CH 353, Physical Chemistry 3
CHE 448, Computer Applications in Chemical Engineering 4
CHE 353, Transport Phenomena 3
E 316K, Masterworks of Literature 3
Total 17
Third Year--Fall Semester

Courses Semester Hours

CH 153K, Physical Chemistry Laboratory 1
CHE 322, Thermodynamics 3
CHE 333T, Engineering Communication 3
CHE 354, Unit Operations I: Transport Processes 3
E E 331, Electrical Circuits, Electronics, and Machinery, or E E 331K, Electric Circuits and Electronics 3
E M 314, Mechanics, or E M 306, Statics 3
Total 16
Third Year--Spring Semester

Courses Semester Hours

CHE 353M, Measurement, Control, and Data Analysis Laboratory 3
CHE 363, Unit Operations II: Separation Processes 3
American history 3
Chemistry elective 4
Approved technical area course 3
Total 16
Fourth Year--Fall Semester

Courses Semester Hours

CHE 350, Chemical Engineering Materials 3
CHE 264, Chemical Engineering Process and Projects Laboratory 2
CHE 372, Chemical Reactor Analysis and Design 3
Approved chemical engineering area course 3
American government 3
Approved advanced mathematics, physics, chemistry, or biology elective 3
Total17
Fourth Year--Spring Semester

Courses Semester Hours

CHE 360, Process Control 3
CHE 473K, Process Design and Operations 4
American history 3
Approved chemical engineering area course 3
Approved technical area course 3
Total16



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Undergraduate catalog

Contents
Chapter 1 - The University
Chapter 2 - School of Architecture
Chapter 3 - Red McCombs School of Business
Chapter 4 - College of Communication
Chapter 5 - College of Education
Chapter 6 - College of Engineering
Chapter 7 - College of Fine Arts
Chapter 8 - College of Liberal Arts
Chapter 9 - College of Natural Sciences
Chapter 10 - School of Nursing
Chapter 11 - College of Pharmacy
Chapter 12 - School of Social Work
Chapter 13 - The Faculty
Texas Common Course Numbering System (Appendix A)
Appendix B


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University of Texas at Austin

27 July 2000. Registrar's Web Team
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