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CONTENTS

CHAPTER 1
The University

CHAPTER 2
School of Architecture

CHAPTER 3
Red McCombs
School of Business


CHAPTER 4
College of Communication

CHAPTER 5
College of Education

CHAPTER 6
College of Engineering

CHAPTER 7
College of Fine Arts

CHAPTER 8
College of Liberal Arts

CHAPTER 9
College of
Natural Sciences


CHAPTER 10
School of Nursing

CHAPTER 11
College of Pharmacy

CHAPTER 12
School of Social Work

CHAPTER 13
The Faculty

Texas Common Course Numbering System
(Appendix A)

APPENDIX B
Degree and Course Abbreviations



     CHAPTER SIX CONTENTS
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Engineering


continued


Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering

Mechanical engineers are directly and broadly concerned with the engineering systems used to control and transform energy to meet the needs of humanity. They design, develop, and produce devices and systems from space probes to washing machines, from turbojet engines to lawn mowers, from automatic machine tools and vending machines to computer-controlled systems. Because mechanical engineering is one of the broadest-based fields of technical study, it is also an excellent foundation for further education in business, law, medicine, and other professions that require a good working knowledge of science and technology.

In addition to the physical sciences, mathematics, and the engineering sciences, mechanical engineering majors study the humanities and social sciences to understand more fully the engineer's relationship and responsibilities to society. Through advanced courses in engineering design and synthesis, they cultivate the ability to apply this knowledge to the analysis and solution of significant engineering problems.

The mechanical engineering curriculum is designed to provide a strong foundation in analysis, problem-solving, engineering design, and communication that graduates can use to further their professional goals through practice or graduate study in engineering or the pursuit of further professional education in another field. Because engineering is a constantly evolving profession, the curriculum seeks to give students the study and organizational skills that support lifelong learning.

Graduates of the program are expected to be able to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering; design and conduct experiments and engineering tests, as well as analyze and interpret data; design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs; function on multidisciplinary teams; identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems; understand professional and ethical responsibilities in the practice of engineering; communicate effectively using oral, written, and graphical expressions, including technical reports; appreciate the impact of engineering solutions in a global and societal context; recognize the need for and have the ability to engage in independent study and lifelong learning; understand contemporary issues and the ways they affect the practice of engineering; use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools, including computers, that are appropriate for good engineering practice.

Containing the following elements, the technical curriculum provides both breadth and depth across a range of topics.

  • A combination of college-level mathematics and basic sciences (some with experimental work) that includes mathematics through differential equations, probability and statistics, physics, and chemistry.
  • Engineering topics that develop a working knowledge of graphics and computer-aided design, engineering mechanics, thermodynamics, kinematics, dynamics and control of mechanical systems, computational methods, fluid mechanics, heat transfer, materials science and engineering, electric circuits and electronics, technical communication, engineering economics, and engineers' professional responsibilities.
  • Mechanical engineering project and laboratory experiences that develop competence in measurements and instrumentation, interpretation of data, reverse engineering analysis of mechanical systems, use of computational tools for engineering analysis, and integration of multidisciplinary topics in design of complex systems.
  • A variety of technical area option courses in biomedical engineering, nuclear and radiation engineering, mechanical systems and design, materials science and engineering, operations research and industrial engineering, and thermal/fluid systems engineering.
  • A series of engineering design courses, culminating in a major capstone design experience in collaboration with an industrial sponsor. This experience prepares students for engineering practice by drawing on the knowledge and skills they have acquired in earlier coursework and by incorporating engineering standards and realistic constraints.
  • A general education component that complements the technical content of the curriculum.

Certificate Programs

Mechanical engineering students may develop added breadth in their education either through the Business Foundations Program or through Elements of Computing, a program in computer sciences for non-computer sciences majors.

Business Foundations Program. Students who would like to learn more about business concepts and practices may take the coursework that leads to a Business Foundations Certificate, awarded by the Red McCombs School of Business. The Business Foundations Program is described in chapter 3; for more information, contact the program office or the Department of Mechanical Engineering undergraduate office.

Elements of Computing. Students who would like to learn more about computer sciences may take the coursework that leads to a certificate in the elements of computing, awarded by the Department of Computer Sciences. The Elements of Computing Program is described in chapter 9; for more information, contact the Department of Mechanical Engineering undergraduate office or the Department of Computer Sciences.

Curriculum

Course requirements are divided into three categories: basic sequence courses, major sequence courses, and other required courses. Enrollment in major sequence courses is restricted to students who have received credit for all of the basic sequence courses and have been admitted to the major sequence by the College of Engineering Admissions Committee. (Requirements for admission to a major sequence are given in this chapter.) Enrollment in other required courses is not restricted by completion of the basic sequence.

Courses used to fulfill technical and nontechnical elective requirements must be approved by the mechanical engineering faculty before the student enrolls in them. Courses that fulfill the social science and fine arts/humanities requirements are listed in this chapter.

Courses Semester Hours

Basic Sequence Courses
Chemistry 301, Engineering Mechanics 306, Mathematics 408C, 408D, 427K, Mechanical Engineering 302, 205, 311, 324, 326, Physics 303K, 303L, 103M, 103N, Rhetoric and Composition 306 43

Major Sequence Courses
Mechanical Engineering 333T, 335, 336, 136L, 338, 339, 242L, 343, 344, 244L, 353, 366J, 466K 36
Approved technical area electives 10

Other Required Courses
Electrical Engineering 331K, Engineering Mechanics 319, English 316K, Mechanical Engineering 111L, 218, 33015
American government, including Texas government 6
American history 6
Approved fine arts or humanities elective 3
Approved mathematics elective 3
Approved natural science/mathematics elective 3
Approved social science elective 3

Minimum Required 128

Technical Area Options

Each student must choose one of the technical area options described below. Those who wish to develop some specialization within mechanical engineering should choose the option from areas I through VI; those who wish to obtain a broader background should choose area VII, general mechanical engineering.

Area I, Biomedical Engineering

There are many areas of biotechnology in which mechanical engineers play an important role. These include biomaterials, biomechanics, fluid flow, heat transfer, mechanical design, nuclear science, and systems analysis. This option also can be tailored to provide a background for professional education in medicine or dentistry or for advanced study in biomedical engineering. Mechanical Engineering 354 and 354M are required in this option.

Mechanical Engineering 337D, Radiation and Radiation Protection
Mechanical Engineering 354, Biomedical Engineering
Mechanical Engineering 354M, Biomechanics of Human Movement
Mechanical Engineering 177K, Projects in Mechanical Engineering
Mechanical Engineering 179M, 279M, or 379M, Topics in Mechanical Engineering (approved topics related to biomedical engineering). More than one topic may be counted as an area elective.
Mechanical Engineering 379N, Engineering Acoustics
Approved biomedical engineering elective, approved natural science elective, or Mechanical Engineering 325L, Cooperative Engineering (a maximum of one course)

Area II, Materials Science and Engineering

Many current mechanical engineering applications and designs are restricted because of limitations imposed by materials properties and by the availability of materials. This option allows students to obtain the BSME with a concentration in materials science and engineering and also provides the basis for pursuing advanced study in this field.

Mechanical Engineering 347, Processing of Materials
Mechanical Engineering 349, Corrosion Engineering
Mechanical Engineering 259, Materials Selection
Mechanical Engineering 260K, Metallurgy of Engineering Alloys
Mechanical Engineering 261M, 361M, Materials Thermodynamics
Mechanical Engineering 378C, Ceramic Engineering
Mechanical Engineering 378K, Mechanical Behavior of Materials
Mechanical Engineering 378P, Properties and Applications of Polymers
Mechanical Engineering 378S, Structural Ceramics
Mechanical Engineering 179M, 279M, or 379M, Topics in Mechanical Engineering (approved topics related to materials science and engineering). More than one topic may be counted as an area elective.
Supporting elective (one course chosen from the list below)

Area III, Mechanical Systems and Design

This option focuses on a number of topics related to mechanical systems and design. Courses are available to support study in analysis and design of control systems, machine design, manufacturing, robotics and automation, electromechanical devices, design methodology, and computer-aided design.

Mechanical Engineering 335M, Electric Machinery and Magnetic Devices
Mechanical Engineering 348C, Introduction to Mechatronics I
Mechanical Engineering 348D, Introduction to Mechatronics II
Mechanical Engineering 350, Machine Tool Operations for Engineers
Mechanical Engineering 352K, Engineering Computer Graphics
Mechanical Engineering 355K, Fundamentals of Engineering Vibrations
Mechanical Engineering 364L, Automatic Control System Design
Mechanical Engineering 365K, Finite Element Method
Mechanical Engineering 365L, Industrial Design for Production
Mechanical Engineering 368J, Computer-Aided Design
Mechanical Engineering 372J, Robotics and Automation
Mechanical Engineering 372M, Mechanism Design
Mechanical Engineering 372N, Design of Smart Mechanisms
Mechanical Engineering 179M, 279M, or 379M, Topics in Mechanical Engineering (approved topics related to mechanical systems and design). More than one topic may be counted as an area elective.
Mechanical Engineering 379N, Engineering Acoustics
Supporting elective (one course chosen from the list below)

Area IV, Nuclear and Radiation Engineering

Engineers with a background in nuclear and radiation engineering find opportunities providing electrical power in safe, efficient, and environmentally benign ways for commercial or defense purposes; extending nuclear reactor plant life, in materials analysis; developing new ways of producing and using radioisotopes in medical physics for organ imaging or cancer therapy; developing new industrial applications for neutron or gamma-ray radiation use; and developing long-term strategies for radioactive waste disposal.

Students may take either of the following options.

Option 1: Nuclear Engineering

Mechanical Engineering 337C, Introduction to Nuclear Power Systems
Mechanical Engineering 361E, Nuclear Reactor Engineering
Mechanical Engineering 361G, Nuclear Reactor Operations and Control
Mechanical Engineering 177K, Projects in Mechanical Engineering (topics in nuclear and radiation engineering)
Mechanical Engineering 179M, 279M, or 379M, Topics in Mechanical Engineering (approved topics related to nuclear and radiation engineering). More than one topic may be counted as an area elective.

Option 2: Radiation Engineering

Mechanical Engineering 337D, Radiation and Radiation Protection
Mechanical Engineering 337E, Radioactive Waste Management
Mechanical Engineering 361F, Radiation and Radiation Protection Laboratory
Mechanical Engineering 177K, Projects in Mechanical Engineering (topics in nuclear and radiation engineering)
Mechanical Engineering 179M, 279M, or 379M, Topics in Mechanical Engineering (approved topics related to nuclear and radiation engineering). More than one topic may be counted as an area elective.

Area V, Operations Research and Industrial Engineering

Today's industrial planners and technical managers commonly use quantitative decision-making techniques. This option melds traditional industrial engineering and its modern outgrowth, operations research. Emphasis is on mathematical modeling, applied statistics, and the use of the computer to assist the decision maker. Students electing this option are expected to take at least nine hours of technical area electives from the following list.

Mechanical Engineering 366L, Operations Research Models
Mechanical Engineering 366M, Operations Research Methods
Mechanical Engineering 367S, Simulation Modeling
Mechanical Engineering 373K, Basic Industrial Engineering
Mechanical Engineering 375K, Production Engineering Management
Mechanical Engineering 179M, 279M, or 379M, Topics in Mechanical Engineering (approved topics related to operations research and industrial engineering). More than one topic may be counted as an area elective.
Mechanical Engineering 325L, Cooperative Engineering

Area VI, Thermal/Fluid Systems

A traditional field of mechanical engineering is the design and manufacture of systems for the production, transmission, storage, and use of energy. This option emphasizes study in thermodynamics, heat transfer, fluid mechanics, thermal energy conversion, and thermal systems design.

Aerospace Engineering 362K, Compressible Fluid Mechanics
Mechanical Engineering 335M, Electric Machinery and Magnetic Devices
Mechanical Engineering 360L, Turbomachinery and Compressible Flow
Mechanical Engineering 360N, Intermediate Heat Transfer
Mechanical Engineering 263L, Energy Systems Laboratory
Mechanical Engineering 369L, Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics
Mechanical Engineering 374C, Combustion Engine Processes
Mechanical Engineering 274D, Automotive Engineering Laboratory
Mechanical Engineering 374L, Design of Thermal Systems
Mechanical Engineering 274R, Design of Air Conditioning Systems
Mechanical Engineering 374S, Solar Energy Systems Design
Mechanical Engineering 179M, 279M, or 379M, Topics in Mechanical Engineering (approved topics related to thermal/fluid systems engineering). More than one topic may be counted as an area elective.
Mechanical Engineering 379N, Engineering Acoustics
Supporting elective (one course chosen from the list below)

Area VII, General Mechanical Engineering

This option allows a student to choose courses from any of the preceding six areas and from the supporting electives listed below. No more than one of the following supporting electives may be included without approval of the undergraduate adviser: Mechanical Engineering 325L, 371K, 277K, 377K.

Supporting Electives

Mechanical Engineering 325L, Cooperative Engineering
Mechanical Engineering 371K, Legal Aspects of Engineering Practice
Mechanical Engineering 177K, 277K, or 377K, Projects in Mechanical Engineering

Students who choose their option program from areas I through VI may use one course in the other five of these areas as a supporting elective.

Suggested Arrangement of Courses

First Year--Fall Semester

Courses Semester Hours

CH 301, Principles of Chemistry I 3
M 408C, Differential and Integral Calculus 4
M E 302, Introduction to Engineering Design and Graphics 3
RHE 306, Rhetoric and Composition 3
Social science or fine arts/humanities elective 3
Total 16
First Year--Spring Semester

Courses Semester Hours

M 408D, Sequences, Series, and Multivariable Calculus 4
M E 205, Computers and Programming 2
PHY 303K, Engineering Physics I 3
PHY 103M, Laboratory for Physics 303K 1
American government 3
Social science or fine arts/humanities elective 3
Total 16
Second Year--Fall Semester

Courses Semester Hours

E 316K, Masterworks of Literature 3
E M 306, Statics 3
M 427K, Advanced Calculus for Applications I 4
M E 326, Thermodynamics 3
PHY 303L, Engineering Physics II 3
PHY 103N, Laboratory for Physics 303L 1
Total 17
Second Year--Spring Semester

Courses Semester Hours

E M 319, Mechanics of Solids 3
M E 311, Materials Engineering 3
M E 111L, Materials Engineering Laboratory 1
M E 218, Engineering Computational Methods 2
M E 324, Kinematics and Dynamics of Mechanical Systems 3
M E 330, Fluid Mechanics 3
Total 15
Third Year--Fall Semester

Courses Semester Hours

E E 331K, Electric Circuits and Electronics 3
M E 335, Probability and Statistics for Engineers 3
M E 336, Materials Processing 3
M E 136L, Materials Processing Laboratory 1
M E 338, Machine Elements 3
M E 339, Heat Transfer 3
Total 16
Third Year--Spring Semester

Courses Semester Hours

M E 333T, Engineering Communication 3
M E 242L, Thermal-Fluid Laboratory 2
M E 343, Thermal-Fluid Systems 3
M E 344, Dynamic Systems and Controls 3
M E 353, Engineering Economic Analysis 3
Approved technical area elective 2
Total 16
Fourth Year--Fall Semester

Courses Semester Hours

M E 244L, Dynamic Systems and Controls Laboratory 2
M E 366J, Mechanical Engineering Design Methodology 3
American history 3
Approved mathematics elective 3
Approved technical area electives 5
Total 16
Fourth Year--Spring Semester

Courses Semester Hours

M E 466K, Mechanical Engineering Design Project 4
American government 3
American history 3
Approved mathematics/natural science elective 3
Approved technical area elective 3
Total 16



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Undergraduate catalog

Contents
Chapter 1 - The University
Chapter 2 - School of Architecture
Chapter 3 - Red McCombs School of Business
Chapter 4 - College of Communication
Chapter 5 - College of Education
Chapter 6 - College of Engineering
Chapter 7 - College of Fine Arts
Chapter 8 - College of Liberal Arts
Chapter 9 - College of Natural Sciences
Chapter 10 - School of Nursing
Chapter 11 - College of Pharmacy
Chapter 12 - School of Social Work
Chapter 13 - The Faculty
Texas Common Course Numbering System (Appendix A)
Appendix B


Related information

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Office of the Registrar
University of Texas at Austin

27 July 2000. Registrar's Web Team
Comments to rgcat@utxdp.dp.utexas.edu