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CONTENTS

CHAPTER 1
The University

CHAPTER 2
School of Architecture

CHAPTER 3
Red McCombs
School of Business


CHAPTER 4
College of Communication

CHAPTER 5
College of Education

CHAPTER 6
College of Engineering

CHAPTER 7
College of Fine Arts

CHAPTER 8
College of Liberal Arts

CHAPTER 9
College of
Natural Sciences


CHAPTER 10
School of Nursing

CHAPTER 11
College of Pharmacy

CHAPTER 12
School of Social Work

CHAPTER 13
The Faculty

Texas Common Course Numbering System
(Appendix A)

APPENDIX B
Degree and Course Abbreviations



     CHAPTER SIX CONTENTS
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Engineering


continued


Bachelor of Science in Petroleum Engineering

Producing oil, gas, and other fluid resources from the earth is the task of the petroleum engineer. This challenging field of engineering requires application of a wide range of knowledge--from the basic sciences of mathematics, physics, geology, and chemistry to the principles of engineering analysis, design, and management.

Petroleum engineers provide the technological expertise to bring oil and natural gas from deep within the earth to the surface for delivery to processing facilities. Petroleum engineers focus on the efficient and safe extraction of fluids from their natural geologic formations.

Once geologists have located potential oil- or gas-bearing formations, petroleum engineers design and monitor the drilling of exploratory and development wells used to locate and produce the fluids contained within these formations. Drilling operations can be extremely expensive and technologically challenging, especially in offshore and remote areas or when drilling horizontal wells. In addition to overseeing drilling, petroleum engineers evaluate the characteristics of oil and gas reservoirs, select and implement recovery methods, develop methods to lift fluids, and design surface collection and treatment facilities to prepare produced hydrocarbons for delivery to a refinery or pipeline. Petroleum engineers are asked to devise novel advanced technologies to recover more oil or gas than what is naturally released from the rock pore system. Advanced computational methods are often used to aid in accurate acquisition and analysis of data, simulation of alternative recovery schemes, and other difficult design problems.

In addition to traditional petroleum engineering career choices, there are other emerging careers for petroleum engineering graduates in pollution cleanup, underground waste disposal, and hydrology. These disciplines increasingly rely on the of petroleum engineers. Additional energy-related applications for which petroleum engineers are uniquely educated include in situ uranium leaching, geothermal energy production, and coal gasification.

Worldwide proved oil and gas reserves are larger than ever before. Experts agree that oil and gas will continue to play an important role in the global energy supply. Because hydrocarbon reserves are found in such diverse areas as Asia, South America, and the Middle East, petroleum engineers will have opportunities for challenging assignments all over the world.

The challenges facing the petroleum industry require large investments in technologically complex projects. The task of making wise and cost-effective investments falls to a great extent upon petroleum engineers, providing them with a high degree of challenge and responsibility.

The degree program that leads to the Bachelor of Science in Petroleum Engineering is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission (EAC). The goal of this program is to prepare graduates to enter and continue the practice of engineering at a professional level. In addition, qualified graduates may pursue graduate study in petroleum engineering and related fields.

Graduates of the program are expected to be able to (1) apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering; (2) design and conduct experiments and engineering tests, as well as analyze and interpret data; (3) design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs; (4) function on multidisciplinary teams; (5) identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems; (6) understand professional and ethical responsibilities in the practice of engineering; (7) communicate effectively using oral, written, and graphical expressions, including the preparation and presentation of technical reports; (8) appreciate the impact of engineering solutions in a global and societal context; (9) recognize the need for and have the ability to engage in independent study and lifelong learning; (10) understand contemporary issues and how they impact the practice of engineering; (11) use techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools appropriate for good engineering practice, including the use of computers.

The technical curriculum contains the following elements:

  • A combination of college-level mathematics and basic sciences (some with experimental work) that includes mathematics through differential equations, probability and statistics, physics, chemistry, and geology.
  • Engineering topics that develop a working knowledge of fluid mechanics, strength of materials, transport phenomena, material properties, phase behavior, and thermodynamics.
  • Petroleum engineering topics that develop competence in: (1) design and analysis of well systems and procedures for drilling and completing wells; (2) characterization and evaluation of subsurface geological formations and their resources using geoscientific and engineering methods; (3) design and analysis of systems for producing, injecting, and handling fluids; (4) application of reservoir engineering principles and practices to optimize resource development and management; and (5) use of project economics and resource valuation methods for design and decision making under conditions of risk and uncertainty.
  • A major capstone design experience that prepares students for engineering practice, based on the knowledge and skills acquired in earlier coursework and incorporating engineering standards and realistic constraints.
  • A general education component that complements the technical content of the curriculum.

Curriculum

Course requirements are divided into three categories: basic sequence courses, major sequence courses, and other required courses. Enrollment in major sequence courses is restricted to students who have received credit for all of the basic sequence courses and have been admitted to the major sequence by the College of Engineering Admissions Committee. (Requirements for admission to a major sequence are given in this chapter.) Enrollment in other required courses is not restricted by completion of the basic sequence.

Courses used to fulfill technical and nontechnical elective requirements must be approved by the petroleum and geosystems engineering undergraduate adviser before the student enrolls in them. Courses that fulfill the social science and fine arts/humanities requirements are listed in this chapter.

Courses Semester Hours

Basic Sequence Courses
Chemistry 301, 302, Engineering Mechanics 306, Geological Sciences 312K, 416M, Mathematics 408C, 408D, 427K, Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 102, 310, 312, 333T, Physics 303K, 303L, 103M, 103N, Rhetoric and Composition 306 49

Major Sequence Courses
Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 421K, 322K, 323, 424, 326, 430, 331, 362, 365, 368, 373K, 373L 39
Approved technical area electives 6

Other Required Courses
English 316K 3
Engineering Mechanics 311, 319 6
Required technical area courses 9 or 10
American government, including Texas government 6
American history 6
Approved fine arts or humanities elective 3
Approved social science elective 3

Minimum Required 130 or 131

Technical Area Options

Before enrolling in the major sequence, each student must file a degree plan with the departmental undergraduate adviser for one of the technical area options described below. Each technical area option consists of three required courses and two elective courses. The selection of elective courses, from lists approved by the departmental faculty, is made with the advice and approval of the undergraduate adviser. Each student should plan a course of study that fulfills the prerequisite of each technical elective selected. Each student in Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 373L is assigned a design project in his or her technical area.

Area I, Reservoir Engineering

Reservoir engineers design and supervise projects to provide the maximum recovery of an underground resource. They determine the locations of wells, estimate the amount of the resource that can be recovered economically, and study the performance of reservoirs to determine methods of increasing recovery.

Geological Sciences 330K, Petroleum Geology: Basin and Trend Analysis
Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 337, Introduction to Geostatistics
Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 432, Geometry and Mechanics of Geological Structures
Two elective courses, for a total of at least six semester hours of credit, chosen from the following subjects. The courses must be approved in advance by the departmental undergraduate adviser.
Advanced mathematics
Economic evaluation, finance, and project management
Formation evaluation
Geological science
Reservoir engineering

Area II, Operations Engineering

Operations engineers design and supervise projects for the drilling, completion, stimulation, and workover of wells. Their primary efforts are directed toward optimizing drilling practices and resource production.

Geological Sciences 330K, Petroleum Geology: Basin and Trend Analysis
Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 337, Introduction to Geostatistics
Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 432, Geometry and Mechanics of Geological Structures
Two elective courses, for a total of at least six semester hours of credit, chosen from the following subjects. The courses must be approved in advance by the departmental undergraduate adviser.
Advanced mathematics
Drilling engineering
Economic evaluation, finance, and project management
Facilities engineering
Formation evaluation
Production engineering

Area III, Subsurface Environmental Engineering

Subsurface environmental engineering addresses today's pressing environmental concerns in the general areas of engineering, geology, and hydrology. This technical area option prepares petroleum engineering graduates to solve problems in related areas such as hydrology, groundwater and soil remediation, and underground waste disposal.

Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 337, Introduction to Geostatistics
Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 432, Geometry and Mechanics of Geological Structures
Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 370, Fundamentals of Subsurface Environmental Engineering
Two elective courses, for a total of at least six semester hours of credit, chosen from the following subjects. The courses must be approved in advance by the departmental undergraduate adviser.
Advanced mathematics
Environmental engineering
Geological science
Hydrology

Area IV, Georesource Engineering

Georesource engineers evaluate the economic and financial viability of petroleum and mineral projects. They evaluate capital and operating costs of such projects, investigate markets and end-uses, and estimate and determine the relative costs and benefits of alternative process routes, environmental regulations, and other legislation.

Geological Sciences 330K, Petroleum Geology: Basin and Trend Analysis
Mechanical Engineering 366L, Operations Research Models
Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 371, Energy Finance
Two elective courses, for a total of at least six semester hours of credit, chosen from the following subjects. The courses must be approved in advance by the departmental undergraduate adviser.
Advanced mathematics
Business law
Economics
Finance
Project management

Suggested Arrangement of Courses

First Year--Fall Semester

Courses Semester Hours

CH 301, Principles of Chemistry I 3
GEO 312K, Geology of Engineering 3
M 408C, Differential and Integral Calculus 4
PGE 102, Introduction to Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 1
RHE 306, Rhetoric and Composition 3
Social science or fine arts/humanities elective 3
Total 17
First Year--Spring Semester

Courses Semester Hours

CH 302, Principles of Chemistry II 3
GEO 416M, Sedimentary Rocks 4
M 408D, Sequences, Series, and Multivariable Calculus 4
PHY 303K, Engineering Physics I 3
PHY 103M, Laboratory for Physics 303K 1
Total 15
Second Year--Fall Semester

Courses Semester Hours

E 316K, Masterworks of Literature 3
E M 306, Statics 3
M 427K, Advanced Calculus for
Applications I
4
PGE 310, Formulation and Solution of Geosystems Engineering Problems 3
PHY 303L, Engineering Physics II 3
PHY 103N, Laboratory for Physics 303L 1
Total 17
Second Year--Spring Semester

Courses Semester Hours

E M 311, Dynamics 3
E M 319, Mechanics of Solids 3
PGE 312, Physical and Chemical Behavior of Fluids I 3
PGE 333T, Engineering Communication 3
Approved technical area course 3
Social science or fine arts/humanities elective 3
Total18
Third Year--Fall Semester

Courses Semester Hours

PGE 322K, Transport Phenomena in Geosystems 3
PGE 430, Drilling and Well Completions 4
PGE 424, Petrophysics 4
PGE 326, Thermodynamics and Phase Behavior 3
American government 3
Total 17
Third Year--Spring Semester

Courses Semester Hours

PGE 421K, Physical and Chemical Behavior of Fluids II 4
PGE 323, Fluid Flow through Permeable Media 3
PGE 365, Resource Economics and Valuation 3
Approved technical area course 3 or 4
American history 3
Total 16 or 17
Fourth Year--Fall Semester

Courses Semester Hours

PGE 331, Fundamentals of Reservoir Engineering 3
PGE 362, Production Technology and Design 3
PGE 368, Fundamentals of Well Logging 3
PGE 373K, Geosystems Engineering Design and Analysis I 3
American government 3
Total 15
Fourth Year--Spring Semester

Courses Semester Hours

PGE 373L, Geosystems Engineering Design and Analysis II 3
American history 3
Approved technical area course 3
Approved technical area electives 6
Total 15



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Undergraduate catalog

Contents
Chapter 1 - The University
Chapter 2 - School of Architecture
Chapter 3 - Red McCombs School of Business
Chapter 4 - College of Communication
Chapter 5 - College of Education
Chapter 6 - College of Engineering
Chapter 7 - College of Fine Arts
Chapter 8 - College of Liberal Arts
Chapter 9 - College of Natural Sciences
Chapter 10 - School of Nursing
Chapter 11 - College of Pharmacy
Chapter 12 - School of Social Work
Chapter 13 - The Faculty
Texas Common Course Numbering System (Appendix A)
Appendix B


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Office of the Registrar
University of Texas at Austin

27 July 2000. Registrar's Web Team
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