UT Austin
Photo
Undergrad 00-02


CONTENTS

CHAPTER 1
The University

CHAPTER 2
School of Architecture

CHAPTER 3
Red McCombs
School of Business


CHAPTER 4
College of Communication

CHAPTER 5
College of Education

CHAPTER 6
College of Engineering

CHAPTER 7
College of Fine Arts

CHAPTER 8
College of Liberal Arts

CHAPTER 9
College of
Natural Sciences


CHAPTER 10
School of Nursing

CHAPTER 11
College of Pharmacy

CHAPTER 12
School of Social Work

CHAPTER 13
The Faculty

Texas Common Course Numbering System
(Appendix A)

APPENDIX B
Degree and Course Abbreviations



     CHAPTER SIX CONTENTS
NEXT FILE IN CHAPTER SIX |  PREVIOUS FILE IN CHAPTER SIX


Engineering


continued


Courses

The faculty has approval to offer the following courses in the academic years 2000-2001 and 2001-2002; however, not all courses are taught each semester or summer session. Students should consult the Course Schedule to determine which courses and topics will be offered during a particular semester or summer session. The Course Schedule may also reflect changes that have been made to the courses listed here since this catalog was printed.

A full explanation of course numbers is given in General Information. In brief, the first digit of a course number indicates the semester hour value of the course. The second and third digits indicate the rank of the course: if they are 01 through 19, the course is of lower-division rank; if 20 through 79, of upper-division rank; if 80 through 99, of graduate rank.

General Engineering

Unless otherwise stated in the description below, each class meets for three lecture hours a week for one semester.

General Engineering: G E

Lower-Division Courses

001F. Freshman Interest Group Seminar.
Restricted to students in the Freshman Interest Group Program. Basic issues in various College of Engineering disciplines. One lecture hour a week for one semester.

102. Introduction to Engineering.
Enrollment restricted to undeclared freshmen in engineering. Introduction to engineering as a profession, including opportunities and responsibilities of a career in engineering. Individual learning skills. Two lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the pass/fail basis only. May not be counted toward any engineering degree.

206C. Supplemental Instruction for Chemistry 304K.
Restricted to engineering students. Development of problem-solving skills in the material covered in Chemistry 304K. Two two-hour laboratory sessions a week for one semester. May not be counted toward any engineering degree. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Chemistry 304K.

206D. Supplemental Instruction for Chemistry 301.
Restricted to engineering students. Development of problem-solving skills in the material covered in Chemistry 301. Two two-hour laboratory sessions a week for one semester. May not be counted toward any engineering degree. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Chemistry 301.

206E. Supplemental Instruction for Chemistry 302.
Restricted to engineering students. Development of problem-solving skills in the material covered in Chemistry 302. Two two-hour laboratory sessions a week for one semester. May not be counted toward any engineering degree. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Chemistry 302.

207C. Supplemental Instruction for Mathematics 408C.
Restricted to engineering students. Development of problem-solving skills in the material covered in Mathematics 408C. Two two-hour laboratory sessions a week for one semester. May not be counted toward any engineering degree. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Mathematics 408C.

207D. Supplemental Instruction for Mathematics 408D.
Restricted to engineering students. Development of problem-solving skills in the material covered in Mathematics 408D. Two two-hour laboratory sessions a week for one semester. May not be counted toward any engineering degree. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Mathematics 408D.

207E. Supplemental Instruction for Mathematics 340L.
Restricted to engineering students. Development of problem-solving skills in the material covered in Mathematics 340L. Two two-hour laboratory sessions a week for one semester. May not be counted toward any engineering degree. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Mathematics 340L.

207G. Supplemental Instruction for Mathematics 305G.
Restricted to engineering students. Development of problem-solving skills in the material covered in Mathematics 305G. Two two-hour laboratory sessions a week for one semester. May not be counted toward any engineering degree. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Mathematics 305G.

207K. Supplemental Instruction for Mathematics 427K.
Restricted to engineering students. Development of problem-solving skills in the material covered in Mathematics 427K. Two two-hour laboratory sessions a week for one semester. May not be counted toward any engineering degree. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Mathematics 427K.

207L. Supplemental Instruction for Mathematics 427L.
Restricted to engineering students. Development of problem-solving skills in the material covered in Mathematics 427L. Two two-hour laboratory sessions a week for one semester. May not be counted toward any engineering degree. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Mathematics 427L.

208C. Supplemental Instruction for Physics 306.
Restricted to engineering students. Development of problem-solving skills in the material covered in Physics 306. Two two-hour laboratory sessions a week for one semester. May not be counted toward any engineering degree. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Physics 306.

208K. Supplemental Instruction for Physics 303K.
Restricted to engineering students. Development of problem-solving skills in the material covered in Physics 303K. Two two-hour laboratory sessions a week for one semester. May not be counted toward any engineering degree. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Physics 303K.

208L. Supplemental Instruction for Physics 303L.
Restricted to engineering students. Development of problem-solving skills in the material covered in Physics 303L. Two two-hour laboratory sessions a week for one semester. May not be counted toward any engineering degree. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Physics 303L.

Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics

Unless otherwise stated in the description below, each class meets for three lecture hours a week for one semester.

Aerospace Engineering: ASE

Lower-Division Courses

201. Introduction to Computer Programming.
Fundamentals of a programming language, with applications to simple engineering and physics problems. Introduction to the UNIX operating system and to computer resources available in the Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics. One lecture hour and three laboratory hours a week for one semester.

102. Introduction to Aerospace Engineering.
Open to any University student. Introduction to engineering analysis and design; introduction to aerodynamics, propulsion, flight mechanics, structural analysis, and orbital mechanics. One lecture hour or three discussion hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Mathematics 408C or 308K, and credit for high school physics or Physics 306.

211. Engineering Computation.
Computer programming, numerical analysis, applications to aerospace engineering problems. Two lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Aerospace Engineering 201 (or 101) and credit or registration for Mathematics 427K.

Upper-Division Courses

320. Introduction to Fluid Mechanics.
Fundamental concepts, fluid statics; integral and differential analysis; detailed analysis of inviscid, incompressible flows; aerodynamics of airfoils and wings. Prerequisite: Mathematics 427L with a grade of at least C and credit or registration for Aerospace Engineering 120K.

120K. Applications of Fluid Mechanics.
Wind tunnel experiments at subsonic speeds; safety. Written reports. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Aerospace Engineering 320.

221K. Structural Analysis.
Analysis of aerospace structural systems, with emphasis on matrix methods. Two lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Engineering Mechanics 319 and Aerospace Engineering 211 (or 311) with a grade of at least C in each, and credit or registration for Aerospace Engineering 121M.

121M. Structural Analysis Laboratory.
Finite element methods of analysis of aerospace structures. Use of ISMIS and NASTRAN computer codes. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Aerospace Engineering 221K (or credit for 321K).

324L. Aerospace Materials Laboratory.
Study of the deformation and fracture behavior of materials used in aerospace vehicles. Structure-property relations, methods of characterizing material behavior, use of properties in the design process. Case histories. Written reports. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Engineering Mechanics 319.

325L. Cooperative Engineering.
This course covers the work period of aerospace engineering students in the Cooperative Engineering Program. Forty laboratory hours a week for three semesters. The student must complete Aerospace Engineering 325LX, 325LY, and 325LZ before a grade and degree credit are awarded. Prerequisite: For 325LX, application to become a member of the Cooperative Engineering Program, approval of the dean, and appointment for a full-time cooperative work tour; for 325LY, Aerospace Engineering 325LX and appointment for a full-time cooperative work tour; for 325LZ, Aerospace Engineering 325LY and appointment for a full-time cooperative work tour.

327. Private Pilot Aeronautics.
Introduction to the principles of private flying; weather, navigation, instruments, aircraft and engine operation, radio use, visual flight planning. May not be counted as an aerospace engineering course for the Bachelor of Science in Aerospace Engineering; may not be counted as a technical elective, a technical area course, or an engineering elective for any engineering degree.

330M. Linear System Analysis.
Mathematical modeling of aerospace systems. Time-domain and frequency-domain analysis of linear, time-invariant, continuous-time, and discrete-time dynamical systems. Prerequisite: Engineering Mechanics 311M and Mathematics 427K with a grade of at least C in each.

339. Advanced Strength of Materials.
Same as Engineering Mechanics 339. Curved beams, shear deformation, beam columns, beams on elastic foundations; inelastic behavior of members; elementary plate bending. Prerequisite: Engineering Mechanics 319.

340. Boundary Layer Theory and Heat Transfer.
Character of viscous fluid motion; laminar and turbulent boundary layer solutions; convective heat transfer solutions for low-speed and high-speed flows; energy transfer by conduction in one and two independent variables; energy transfer by radiation. Prerequisite: Aerospace Engineering 320.

346. Viscous Fluid Flow.
Navier-Stokes equations, laminar and turbulent boundary layers, transition, effects of pressure gradients and compressibility. Aerospace Engineering 346 and 379L (Topic 5: Viscous Fluid Flow) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Aerospace Engineering 320 and Mechanical Engineering 326.

347. Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics.
Development and implementation of finite-difference schemes for numerical solution of subsonic, transonic, and supersonic flows. Emphasis on convection and diffusion equations of fluid dynamics. Evaluation of accuracy, stability, and efficiency. Prerequisite: Aerospace Engineering 211 (or 311) and 320.

355. Aeroelasticity.
Flutter, divergence, control reversal, flexibility effects on aircraft stability and control; design implications; stability augmentation and response suppression; introduction to quasi-steady aerodynamic theories. Prerequisite: Aerospace Engineering 221K (or 321K), 121M, and 330M.

357. Mechanics of Composite Materials.
Anisotropic constitutive relationships, lamination theory, failure theories, micromechanical behavior of laminates; laminated composite plates--bending, vibration, and buckling; composite fabrication, sandwich and other composite lightweight structures. Prerequisite: Aerospace Engineering 221K (or 321K) and 121M, or consent of instructor.

261K. Aircraft Design.
Application of aerodynamics, structures, propulsion, stability, and performance principles to the design of aircraft; mission requirements; configuration selection; cost; ethics and liability. Two lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Aerospace Engineering 367K and 376K and completion of approved communication elective (Civil Engineering 333T or English 317 or the equivalent).

161M. Aircraft Design Laboratory.
Computer-aided aircraft design; trade-off analyses, conceptual and preliminary design reviews. Written reports. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Aerospace Engineering 261K.

362K. Compressible Fluid Mechanics.
Shock and expansion waves; compressibility effects on aerodynamics of airfoils and bodies; subsonic and supersonic airfoil design. Prerequisite: For aerospace engineering majors, Aerospace Engineering 376K; for others, Mechanical Engineering 330 or the equivalent.

162M. Applied Compressible Fluid Mechanics.
Wind tunnel and ballistic range experiments with supersonic flows; safety. Written reports. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Aerospace Engineering 362K.

363L. History of Space Flight.
History and principles of space flight from early Chinese rocket experiments to Apollo 17 and the Space Shuttle; technological benefits from the space program and future space projects. May not be counted as an aerospace engineering course for the Bachelor of Science in Aerospace Engineering; may not be counted as a technical elective, a technical area course, or an engineering elective for any engineering degree. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

463Q. Design and Testing of Aerospace Structures.
Design of structural components; experimental study of static and dynamic behavior of structures; liability and ethics. Written reports. Three lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Aerospace Engineering 369K, credit or registration for Aerospace Engineering 365, and completion of approved communication elective (Civil Engineering 333T or English 317 or the equivalent).

365. Structural Dynamics.
Discrete and continuous models of structures; analysis of transient and steady-state responses; design of dynamic structures by analytical and computer methods. Prerequisite: Aerospace Engineering 221K (or 321K), 121M, and 330M.

366K. Spacecraft Dynamics.
Basic satellite and spacecraft motion, orbital elements, coordinate systems and transformations; basic three-dimensional spacecraft attitude dynamics. Prerequisite: Engineering Mechanics 311M and Mathematics 427K with a grade of at least C in each.

366L. Applied Orbital Mechanics.
Selected topics in satellite motion and satellite applications, orbital coordinate systems, time, rendezvous and intercept, interplanetary trajectories, perturbing forces and perturbed trajectories. Prerequisite: Aerospace Engineering 366K.

166M. Space Applications Laboratory.
Mission design program library, numerical techniques, mission planning references, mission constraints, mission design projects. Written reports. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Aerospace Engineering 366K.

367K. Flight Dynamics.
Equations of motion for rigid aircraft; aircraft performance, weight and balance, static stability and control, and dynamic stability; design implications. Prerequisite: Aerospace Engineering 320 and 330M.

167M. Flight Dynamics Laboratory.
Introduction to flight testing; instrumentation and methodology; performance testing. Computer modeling and dynamic simulation of aircraft motion; aircraft sizing. Written reports. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Aerospace Engineering 367K.

369K. Measurements and Instrumentation.
Design of measurement systems; standards; calibration; digital signal processing, time-domain and frequency-domain representation of data; transducers and signal conditioning; measurement of acceleration, displacement, force, length, strain, and temperature; safety. Written reports. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Engineering Mechanics 319 and Electrical Engineering 331K, and credit or registration for an approved communication elective (Civil Engineering 333T or English 317 or the equivalent).

370L. Flight Control Systems.
Analysis and design of feedback control systems using both frequency-domain and time-domain techniques; applications to analog and digital automatic flight control systems. Prerequisite: Aerospace Engineering 366K and 367K.

372K. Advanced Spacecraft Dynamics.
Satellite and interplanetary orbit determination, orbit and mission design, proximity operations, vehicle attitude descriptions, attitude determination, attitude control systems, attitude perturbations, vehicle attitude design considerations. Prerequisite: Aerospace Engineering 366K.

372L. Satellite Applications.
Classical and modern orbit determination, remote sensors and their outputs, pattern recognition, image enhancement, satellite data analysis projects. Prerequisite: Aerospace Engineering 366K.

372N. Satellite Navigation.
Satellite-based navigation systems, with focus on the Global Positioning System, ground and space segments, navigation receivers, satellite signal coordinate/time systems, denial of signal, differential techniques, GPS data analysis. Prerequisite: Aerospace Engineering 366K or consent of instructor.

274L. Spacecraft/Mission Design Principles.
Spacecraft systems characteristics, mission requirements, sensors, consumables analyses; mission phases--launch, on-orbit, termination; communications, trajectory design; ethics, liability. Two lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Aerospace Engineering 376K, credit or registration for Aerospace Engineering 166M and 372K, and completion of approved communication elective (Civil Engineering 333T or English 317 or the equivalent).

174M. Spacecraft/Mission Design Laboratory.
Request for proposal, problem definition, ideation, proposal preparation, conceptual design review, preliminary design development and review, design report preparation. Written reports. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Aerospace Engineering 274L.

376K. Propulsion.
Aspects of one-dimensional compressible flow, including isentropic flow and normal shocks; effects of friction and combustion; analysis and design of rockets and air-breathing engines, including performance and cycle analysis; flow in nozzles, diffusers, compressors, and turbines; combustion chamber processes and propellants. Prerequisite: Aerospace Engineering 320 and Mechanical Engineering 326.

179K, 279K, 379K. Research in Aerospace Engineering.
Directed study or research in a selected area of aerospace engineering. One, two, or three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, a grade point average of at least 3.00, selection of project, and consent of faculty member directing project, the student's adviser, and the undergraduate adviser.

379L. Studies in Aerospace Engineering.
Courses on current topics in aerospace engineering. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: Selected Topics in Fluid Mechanics.Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

Topic 2: Selected Topics in Structural Mechanics.Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

Topic 3: Selected Topics in Flight Mechanics.Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

Topic 4: Selected Topics in Orbital Mechanics.Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

Topic 7: Introductory Ocean Engineering.Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

Topic 8: Control Systems Laboratory. Nine laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Aerospace Engineering 370L.

Engineering Mechanics: E M

Lower-Division Courses

306. Statics.
Vector algebra, force systems, free-body diagrams; engineering applications of equilibrium, including frames, friction, distributed loads; centroids, moments of inertia. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, with discussion hours if necessary. May not be counted by students with credit for Engineering Mechanics 306S. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Mathematics 408D or 308L, and credit or registration for Physics 303K and 103M.

311. Dynamics.
Not open to aerospace engineering majors. Two-dimensional kinematics and dynamics, including work-energy and impulse-momentum methods, applied to engineering problems involving particles and rigid bodies. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, with discussion hours if necessary. May not be counted by students with credit for Engineering Mechanics 311M. Prerequisite: Engineering Mechanics 306 (or 306S), and Mathematics 408D or 308L.

311M. Dynamics.
Two- and three-dimensional kinematics and dynamics, applied to a broad class of engineering problems. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, with discussion hours if necessary. Prerequisite: Engineering Mechanics 306 (or 306S) with a grade of at least C, and Mathematics 408D or 308L with a grade of at least C.

314. Mechanics.
Force systems, free-body diagrams; engineering applications of equilibrium and of kinematics and dynamics of particles and rigid bodies. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, with discussion hours if necessary. Prerequisite: Physics 303K and 103M, and Mathematics 408D or 308L.

319. Mechanics of Solids.
Internal forces and deformations in solids; stress and strain in elastic and plastic solids; application to simple engineering problems. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, with discussion hours if necessary. Prerequisite: Engineering Mechanics 306 (or 306S) with a grade of at least C, and Mathematics 408D or 308L with a grade of at least C.

Upper-Division Courses

339. Advanced Strength of Materials.
Same as Aerospace Engineering 339. Curved beams, shear deformation, beam columns, beams on elastic foundations; inelastic behavior of members; elementary plate bending. Prerequisite: Engineering Mechanics 319.

360. Studies in Engineering Mechanics.
Advanced work in the various areas of engineering mechanics, based on recent developments. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing in engineering and consent of instructor.

Topic 4: Theory of Material Science.

Topic 9: Introduction to Biomechanics.

Topic 11: Biomedical Materials.

Topic 12: Mechanics of Product Liability.

Topic 13: Applications of Finite Element Methods.

Topic 17: Individual Research.



Top of File      Chapter Six
      

Contents |  Next file |  Previous file


Undergraduate catalog

Contents
Chapter 1 - The University
Chapter 2 - School of Architecture
Chapter 3 - Red McCombs School of Business
Chapter 4 - College of Communication
Chapter 5 - College of Education
Chapter 6 - College of Engineering
Chapter 7 - College of Fine Arts
Chapter 8 - College of Liberal Arts
Chapter 9 - College of Natural Sciences
Chapter 10 - School of Nursing
Chapter 11 - College of Pharmacy
Chapter 12 - School of Social Work
Chapter 13 - The Faculty
Texas Common Course Numbering System (Appendix A)
Appendix B


Related information

Catalogs
Course Schedules
Academic Calendars
Office of Admissions


Office of the Registrar
University of Texas at Austin

27 July 2000. Registrar's Web Team
Comments to rgcat@utxdp.dp.utexas.edu