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CONTENTS

CHAPTER 1
The University

CHAPTER 2
School of Architecture

CHAPTER 3
Red McCombs
School of Business


CHAPTER 4
College of Communication

CHAPTER 5
College of Education

CHAPTER 6
College of Engineering

CHAPTER 7
College of Fine Arts

CHAPTER 8
College of Liberal Arts

CHAPTER 9
College of
Natural Sciences


CHAPTER 10
School of Nursing

CHAPTER 11
College of Pharmacy

CHAPTER 12
School of Social Work

CHAPTER 13
The Faculty

Texas Common Course Numbering System
(Appendix A)

APPENDIX B
Degree and Course Abbreviations



     CHAPTER EIGHT CONTENTS
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Liberal Arts


continued


Degrees

The College of Liberal Arts offers two degree programs: the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I, and the Bachelor of Arts, Plan II.

The requirements of the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I, begin below. For this degree students may major in any of the departments of the College of Liberal Arts or the College of Natural Sciences; these majors are listed under the heading "Degree Programs" in chapter 1. With the approval of the appropriate deans, the student may also seek the Bachelor of Arts with a major in another college or school of the University.

The Bachelor of Arts, Plan II, a broad liberal arts program for outstanding students, is described below.

Program in Comparative Literature

The program in comparative literature approaches the study of literature from a variety of viewpoints rather than from the viewpoint of a single language or nation. Courses in literary history, practical criticism, and critical theory stress the relationship between literature and other disciplines in the humanities, the arts, and the social sciences. The program offers both the doctoral and the master's degree and sponsors courses on both the graduate and the undergraduate level, ranging from courses in a specific literary genre or period to those in literary criticism and theory.

Applicability of Certain Courses

Physical Activity Courses

Physical activity (PED) courses and Kinesiology 119 may not be counted toward a degree in the College of Liberal Arts. However, they are counted as courses for which the student is enrolled, and the grades are included in the grade point average.

ROTC Courses

ROTC units are maintained on campus by the Departments of Air Force Science, Military Science, and Naval Science. For information about each program, consult the chairman of the department concerned.

Nine semester hours of coursework in air force science, military science, or naval science may be counted toward any degree in the College of Liberal Arts. Such credit may be used only as electives and/or to fulfill the substantial writing component requirement, and only by students who are commissioned.

Bible Courses

Bible courses may be counted as lower-division electives in College of Liberal Arts degree programs that have room for such electives. No more than twelve semester hours of Bible courses may be counted toward any degree offered by the University.

Admission Deficiencies

Students admitted to the University with deficiencies in high school units must remove them by the means prescribed in General Information. Contact the dean's office for further information.

Correspondence and Extension Courses

Credit that a University student in residence earns simultaneously by correspondence or extension from the University or elsewhere or in residence at another school will not be counted toward a degree in the College of Liberal Arts unless specifically approved in advance by the dean. In very special circumstances, the dean may allow a student in residence to take one or more courses by extension or correspondence. No more than 30 percent of the semester hours required for any degree offered in the College of Liberal Arts may be taken by correspondence. For additional information about correspondence work by resident students, see General Information.

Courses Taken on the Pass/Fail Basis

No more than sixteen semester hours taken on the pass/fail basis may be counted toward the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I; no more than nineteen semester hours taken on the pass/fail basis may be counted toward the Bachelor of Arts, Plan II. In general, only electives may be taken on the pass/fail basis. Complete rules on registration on the pass/fail basis are given in General Information.

Bachelor of Arts, Plan I

The requirements for the Bachelor of Arts under Plan I are designed to give each student flexibility in the selection of courses to meet individual needs. Except for the limits imposed by specific requirements in the Plan I degree program, there is no restriction on the number of courses a student may take in other colleges and schools of the University.

Students in the Bachelor of Arts program, Plan I, are permitted, with the approval of the deans of the colleges or schools involved, to major in departments in other colleges and schools of the University.

Summary of the Bachelor of Arts Degree, Plan I

The following is a brief overview of the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I; for detailed regulations see "Degree Requirements, Specific."

A total of 120 semester hours is required for the degree. Of the 120 hours, thirty-six must be in upper-division courses. At least thirty hours, including eighteen hours of upper-division coursework, and at least twenty-four of the last thirty hours must be taken in residence at the University. Provided residence rules are met, credit may be earned by examination, by extension, by correspondence (up to 30 percent of the hours required for the degree), or, with the approval of the dean, by work transferred from another institution. A maximum of sixteen semester hours of classroom and/or correspondence coursework may be taken on the pass/fail basis.

Three categories of work must be completed: prescribed work, major and minor requirements, and electives to provide a total of 120 semester hours.

Prescribed Work

For all majors for the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I, there are four specific area requirements that make up about half of the degree program:

Area A (English composition and literature, writing, and foreign language): Three semester hours of rhetoric and composition and three of English are required. In addition, each student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component. One of these courses must be upper-division. The foreign language requirement is the attainment of a certain proficiency as well as the completion of a specified number of courses; the actual number of hours varies with the language selected and with previous knowledge of the language.

Area B (social sciences): Eighteen semester hours must be completed, including courses in four subjects. Of these eighteen hours, six hours must be in American history and six hours must be in American government, including Texas government.

Area C (natural sciences): Eighteen semester hours are required, including three hours of mathematics. No more than nine of the eighteen hours may be in any one subject. Lists of courses that may be used to fulfill this requirement are available in the Student Division.

Area D (general culture): Six semester hours are required. Lists of courses that may be used to fulfill this requirement are available in the Student Division.

Courses in the major and minor may be used to fulfill area requirements unless expressly prohibited. A course taken to meet the requirements of one area may not also be used to fulfill the requirements of another area. The only exception to this rule is that a course taken to fulfill another area requirement may also fulfill the requirement for courses having a substantial writing component, if the course is so certified. No courses used to fulfill area requirements may be taken on the pass/fail basis.

Major

Each candidate must select a major. The number of semester hours required in the major varies with the field selected. Some majors require specific courses in other subjects as well. At least eighteen hours of coursework in the major, including six hours of upper-division coursework, must be completed in residence at the University.

Minor

To complete the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I, students in most majors must also choose a minor. General requirements are given in "Majors and Minors" in this chapter. Specific requirements for a minor are listed with each set of major requirements.

Electives

The remaining coursework needed for the required total of 120 semester hours consists of electives. In particular, no more than thirty-six hours may be counted in any one subject (including the major, unless major requirements state otherwise) or in courses offered in any one college or school other than the College of Liberal Arts or the College of Natural Sciences. A maximum of sixteen hours of elective coursework may be taken on the pass/fail basis.

Degree Requirements, Specific

Specific requirements for the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I, are divided into four areas: A, B, C, and D. Interdepartmental courses and credit by examination may be used to meet these requirements. Courses in the major and minor may be used to fulfill area requirements unless expressly prohibited. A course taken to meet the requirements of one area may not also be used to fulfill the requirements of another area; the only exception to this rule is that a course taken to fulfill another area requirement may also be used to fulfill the requirement for courses having a substantial writing component, if the course is so certified. No courses used to fulfill area requirements may be taken on the pass/fail basis.

In addition to the following requirements, the student must fulfill the University requirements for graduation given in chapter 1 and the requirements of the College of Liberal Arts given in this chapter.

Prescribed Work

Area A

English composition and literature: Rhetoric and Composition 306 and English 316K.

Writing: In addition to Rhetoric and Composition 306 and English 316K, each student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component. One of these courses must be upper-division; both must be taken for a letter grade. Courses used to fulfill the writing requirement may be used simultaneously to fulfill other area requirements or major requirements, unless otherwise specified. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.

Foreign language: Students must complete four semesters in a single foreign language.

The foreign language requirement is the attainment of a certain proficiency, as well as the completion of a specified number of courses; however, the courses taken to gain this proficiency are not electives and may not be taken on the pass/fail basis. Any part of the requirement may be fulfilled by credit by examination. Students may accelerate their progress at any point in the sequence by means of credit by examination.

To achieve proficiency in a foreign language as rapidly as possible, qualified students are urged to take advantage of the intensive foreign language study program. Information about this program is available from the appropriate language department. Courses used to fulfill the foreign language requirement must be language courses; literature-in-translation courses, for example, may not be counted.

Area B

Eighteen semester hours, distributed among at least four of the following fields of study. Courses in social sciences not listed may be used if approved by the dean. None of the courses used to fulfill Area B requirements may be taken on the pass/fail basis. Courses in anthropology, geography, linguistics, and psychology used to fulfill Area B requirements may not also be used to fulfill Area C requirements.

  1. Six hours in each of the following fields of study:
    1. American government, including Texas government
    2. American history
  2. Three hours each from any two of the following fields of study:
    1. Anthropology
    2. Economics
    3. Geography
    4. Linguistics
    5. Psychology
    6. Sociology

Area C

Each student must have credit for three semester hours in a course offered by the University of Texas at Austin Department of Mathematics, excluding Mathematics 301, 316K, and 316L. Algebra courses at the level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the Area C requirement or toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics 301 or 303D without degree credit to remove their deficiency.

Fifteen additional semester hours, with no more than nine in any one department, from the fields of study listed below. No more than nine hours of mathematics and computer sciences combined may be included in these fifteen hours. Nine of these fifteen hours must be taken in courses in the College of Natural Sciences, items 1 through 10 below, with at least six hours taken in one subject from items 1 through 8; these nine hours may include no more than three hours of mathematics or computer sciences. The remaining six hours may be chosen from courses in the natural sciences listed below or from the list of approved alternative courses in subjects 11 through 16 that is available in the Student Division. Of these six hours, a maximum of three semester hours in courses in either the history of science or the philosophy of science may be used.

A course listed in two or more departments may be used as a course in only one department in fulfilling requirements under Area C. Courses in anthropology, geography, linguistics, and psychology used to fulfill Area C requirements may not also be used to fulfill Area B requirements. Courses in philosophy used to fulfill Area C requirements may not also be used to fulfill Area D requirements.

  1. Astronomy
  2. Biology
  3. Chemistry
  4. Geological sciences
  5. Marine science
  6. Nutrition
  7. Physical science
  8. Physics
  9. Mathematics
  10. Computer sciences
  11. Experimental psychology
  12. Physical anthropology
  13. Physical geography
  14. Philosophy (courses in logic)
  15. History of science and philosophy of science
  16. Other science courses approved by the dean

Students should confer with their departmental advisers or with counselors in the Student Division to determine which courses are included in items 11 through 16.

Students, counselors, and advisers are urged to make careful selection of Area C courses in order to develop a meaningful pattern and a coherent sequence.

Area D

Six semester hours from the fields of study listed below. Three of these six hours must be chosen from subarea 1, 2, 3, or 4 (excluding courses in logic).

A student who uses Greek or Latin to meet the foreign language requirement may use additional coursework in the same language to meet the Area D requirement, but only upper-division courses may be used.

  1. Architecture
  2. Classics, including classical civilization, Greek, Latin
  3. Fine arts, including art history, design, ensemble, fine arts, instruments, music, studio art, theatre and dance, visual art studies
  4. Philosophy
  5. Other courses that emphasize the topics listed above, if approved by the Office of the Dean. A list of approved alternatives is available in the Student Division.

Special Requirements

Elective Requirements and Limitations

In addition to the area requirements given above and the major requirements given in "Majors and Minors," the student must take enough elective coursework to complete the 120 semester hours required for the degree. A student may count no more than twelve semester hours of lower-division Bible courses, nine hours of ROTC courses, sixteen hours of coursework taken on the pass/fail basis, thirty-six hours in any one subject offered in the College of Liberal Arts or the College of Natural Sciences (except where the requirements for the major state otherwise), and thirty-six hours in courses offered in any other single college or school of the University.

Minimum Scholastic Requirements

The student must earn a grade point average of at least 2.00 in all courses taken at the University of Texas at Austin (including credit by examination, correspondence, and extension) for which a grade or symbol other than Q, W, X, or CR is recorded; in addition, the student must earn a grade point average of at least 2.00 in courses taken at the University and counted toward the major requirement. The student should also refer to the description of his or her major program in the section "Majors and Minors," since some majors include higher minimum scholastic requirements.

For more information about grades and the grade point average, see General Information.

Concentrations

Within the general requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Arts and the requirements of the major, a student may also complete a concentration in one of the following programs offered by the College of Liberal Arts.

Any course taken to meet the requirements under "Prescribed Work" may also be counted toward the requirements of a concentration, unless otherwise specified.

European Studies

The concentration in European studies is designed to complement departmental specialization with an integrated sequence of courses that emphasizes a multidisciplinary approach to modern European history, politics, and culture. Students who wish to enter the program should consult the European studies adviser.

The student must fulfill the following requirements:

  1. A departmental major or the equivalent.
  2. Competence in an appropriate European language. Students must fulfill the foreign language requirement given in "Prescribed Work." In addition, they must take at least one upper-division language course that provides practice in writing and speaking.
  3. European Studies 305 and 362. With the approval of the European studies adviser, an upper-division course may be substituted for European Studies 305. European Studies 362, taken near the end of the program, is fashioned to suit the student's individual needs and interests. It includes the writing of a substantial research paper, which must be interdisciplinary in theme, perspective, or methodology. Two readers from different disciplines supervise and judge the paper.
  4. Four additional three-semester-hour courses in the field of European studies, chosen in consultation with the European studies adviser from a list prescribed by the European studies faculty committee.

Folklore

The concentration in folklore allows students to pursue a program of interdisciplinary specialization in addition to the major. Students who wish to enter the folklore program should consult the undergraduate adviser in the Center for Intercultural Studies in Folklore and Ethnomusicology.

A student in the program must fulfill the requirements of a major in English, anthropology, history, sociology, psychology, a foreign language, ethnic studies, American studies, Latin American studies, or another field approved by the adviser. The student must also complete a folklore concentration consisting of (1) Anthropology 325K or English 325K, Anthropology 325L or English 325L, and Folklore 340; (2) three other courses from a group of folklore-related courses prescribed by the Folklore Committee; and (3) two other courses from a group of supporting courses prescribed by the Folklore Committee. Courses required for the concentration may also be counted toward the major requirement.

Technology, Literacy, and Culture

The goal of this concentration is to prepare students to use emerging technologies humanely and critically; to participate thoughtfully in public discourse about new technologies; and to understand the consequences of public and private decisions about technology. The concentration is designed to allow students to gain experience with the application of historical, philosophical, rhetorical, economic, political, aesthetic, and scientific practices, methods of inquiry, and theories in technologically rich environments. Students have the opportunity to practice the new literacies that are required to thrive in these environments by exploring new ways of seeking, using, and representing information.

The program of study is designed to complement the major by helping the student to gain a richer and more profound understanding of the dynamic relationships among technology, culture, and the individual. The concentration is open to liberal arts majors and, with the approval of their deans, to students in other colleges and schools.

The student must fulfill the following requirements. Courses required for the concentration may also be used to fulfill major requirements.

  1. A departmental major or the equivalent.
  2. Eighteen semester hours of coursework, consisting of Technology, Literacy, and Culture 321; twelve hours of related coursework; and a capstone seminar, Technology, Literacy, and Culture 360. A list of related courses that will fulfill this requirement is available from the Division of Rhetoric and Composition; courses that are not on the list may be used with the written consent of the division's undergraduate adviser.

Women's Studies

The concentration in women's studies offers an interdisciplinary specialization in contemporary scholarship and research on women and on gender. The program of study is designed to complement the student's major, with courses drawn from the humanities, the empirical social sciences, the natural sciences, the arts, and multicultural studies. Students completing the concentration may choose to present a thesis involving original research or scholarship. With the approval of his or her dean and the women's studies adviser, a student outside the College of Liberal Arts may complete a concentration in women's studies.

The student must fulfill the following requirements. Courses required for the concentration may also be used to fulfill major requirements.

  1. A departmental major or the equivalent.
  2. Eighteen semester hours, consisting of six semester hours chosen from Women's Studies 321, 322, and 323 and twelve additional semester hours in women's studies. At least three of these twelve hours must be in a topic of Women's Studies 340 and at least six of them must be upper-division. Women's Studies 360 may be included among the eighteen semester hours required.



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Undergraduate catalog

Contents
Chapter 1 - The University
Chapter 2 - School of Architecture
Chapter 3 - Red McCombs School of Business
Chapter 4 - College of Communication
Chapter 5 - College of Education
Chapter 6 - College of Engineering
Chapter 7 - College of Fine Arts
Chapter 8 - College of Liberal Arts
Chapter 9 - College of Natural Sciences
Chapter 10 - School of Nursing
Chapter 11 - College of Pharmacy
Chapter 12 - School of Social Work
Chapter 13 - The Faculty
Texas Common Course Numbering System (Appendix A)
Appendix B


Related information

Catalogs
Course Schedules
Academic Calendars
Office of Admissions


Office of the Registrar
University of Texas at Austin

27 July 2000. Registrar's Web Team
Comments to rgcat@utxdp.dp.utexas.edu