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CONTENTS

CHAPTER 1
The University

CHAPTER 2
School of Architecture

CHAPTER 3
Red McCombs
School of Business


CHAPTER 4
College of Communication

CHAPTER 5
College of Education

CHAPTER 6
College of Engineering

CHAPTER 7
College of Fine Arts

CHAPTER 8
College of Liberal Arts

CHAPTER 9
College of
Natural Sciences


CHAPTER 10
School of Nursing

CHAPTER 11
College of Pharmacy

CHAPTER 12
School of Social Work

CHAPTER 13
The Faculty

Texas Common Course Numbering System
(Appendix A)

APPENDIX B
Degree and Course Abbreviations



     CHAPTER NINE CONTENTS
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Natural Sciences


continued


Bachelor of Science in Clinical Laboratory Science

The student preparing for a career in clinical laboratory science (medical technology) completes about one hundred hours of academic work at the University and then enters an accredited school of clinical laboratory science (or medical technology) for an additional twelve-month training program. Upon completion of the training program, the student is awarded the Bachelor of Science in Clinical Laboratory Science and is eligible for national certifying examinations administered by the National Certifying Agency (NCA) and the American Society of Clinical Pathologists (ASCP). Successful completion of these exams results in national certification as a clinical laboratory scientist or medical technologist.

The purpose of this degree program is to meet the increasing demand for laboratory professionals in hospital and clinic laboratories, research, industry, public health, education, and laboratory management. Clinical laboratory science is also an excellent foundation for graduate study in medicine, dentistry, management, education, and other disciplines.

Prescribed Work

  1. Rhetoric and Composition 306 and English 316K. In addition, in taking courses to fulfill other degree requirements, the student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component; one of these courses must be upper-division. If the writing requirement is not fulfilled by courses specified for the degree, the student must fulfill it either with electives or with coursework taken in addition to the number of hours required for the degree. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.
  2. Courses 506 and 507 (or the equivalent) in a single foreign language, or as much of this coursework as required by the student's score on the appropriate language placement test. For students who enter the University with fewer than two high school units in a single foreign language, the first two semesters in a language may not be counted toward the one hundred semester hours of academic work specified in requirement 11 below.
  3. Six semester hours of American government, including Texas government.
  4. Six semester hours of American history.
  5. Three semester hours in anthropology, economics, geography, linguistics, psychology, or sociology.
  6. Mathematics 305G or 408C. Algebra courses at the level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics 301 without degree credit to remove their deficiency.
  7. Three semester hours in architecture, art (including art history, design, studio art, visual art studies), classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts, music (including music, instruments, ensemble), philosophy (excluding courses in logic), or theatre and dance.
  8. Biology 211, 212, 213, 214, 325, 226R, 226S, 226T, 126L, 329 or 330, 360K, 160L, 361, 361L, and three additional hours of biology.
  9. Chemistry 301; 302; 204; either 610A, 610B, and 210C, or 618A, 118K, 618B, and 118L; 455; and 369.
  10. Eight semester hours of physics in one of the following sequences: Physics 317K, 117M, 317L, and 117N; 302K, 102M, 302L, and 102N; 301, 101L, 316, and 116L; or 303K, 103M, 303L, and 103N.
  11. Enough additional elective coursework if necessary to make a total of at least one hundred semester hours of academic work completed before the twelve-month training program.
  12. The completion of twelve months of training in a program of clinical laboratory science (or medical technology) accredited by the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Science (NAACLS). Upon completion of the program, the student must submit a transcript showing grades in all courses in the program to the Office of the Dean, College of Natural Sciences, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 787121199. To be counted toward the degree, the coursework must be approved by the faculty adviser in the School of Biological Sciences and the dean. None of the work in the training program may be used to fulfill residence requirements.

Special Requirements

The student must fulfill the University-wide graduation requirements given in chapter 1 and the college requirements given in this chapter. He or she must also make a grade of at least C in each course used to fulfill requirements 8 and 12 of the prescribed work above.

Order and Choice of Work

The student should consult the faculty adviser each semester regarding order and choice of work and balancing the laboratory load. Students should complete the requirements both for general chemistry (Chemistry 301, 302, and 204) and for introductory biology (Biology 211, 212, 213, and 214) during the first year, since these courses are prerequisites for Biology 325 and subsequent biology courses. Organic chemistry (Chemistry 610A, 610B, and 210C; or 618A, 118K, 618B, and 118L) should be completed as soon thereafter as possible, since it is prerequisite to biochemistry. To complete the program within four years, the student must take some courses during the summer.

Bachelor of Science in Computer Sciences

The Bachelor of Science in Computer Sciences degree program provides a strong technical background for students planning to begin careers upon graduation and for those interested in graduate study in computer sciences. This program allows students to take more coursework in computer sciences and related technical areas than does the Bachelor of Arts degree program.

Prescribed Work

  1. Rhetoric and Composition 306 and English 316K. In addition, in taking courses to fulfill other degree requirements, the student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component; one of these courses must be upper-division. If the writing requirement is not fulfilled by courses specified for the degree, the student must fulfill it either with electives or with coursework taken in addition to the number of hours required for the degree. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.
  2. Proficiency in a foreign language equivalent to that shown by the completion of three semesters of college coursework. For students who enter the University with fewer than two high school units in a single foreign language, the first two semesters in a language may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree.
  3. Six semester hours of American history.
  4. Six semester hours of American government, including Texas government.
  5. Three semester hours in psychology, anthropology, economics, sociology, geography, or linguistics (excluding Linguistics 340).
  6. One of the following sequences of six to nine semester hours of coursework, including a laboratory component if appropriate:
    1. Chemistry 301, 302, and 204.
    2. Biology 211, 212, and either 213 or 214; and one of the following courses: Biology 205L, 206L, and 208L.
    3. Geological Sciences 401 and either 404C or 405.
    4. Physics: Physics 315 and an upper-division course approved by the undergraduate adviser.
    5. Mathematics: Two of the following courses: Mathematics 427K, 427L, 343K or 373K, 361, 361K, 362K, 365C, 367K, 372, 373L, and 374. Other mathematics courses may be used with the approval of the undergraduate adviser. A course may not be counted toward both requirement 6 and requirement 8.
    6. Electrical Engineering 411 and 313.
  7. Three semester hours in architecture, art (including art history, design, studio art, visual art studies), classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts, music (including music, instruments, ensemble), philosophy (excluding courses in logic), or theatre and dance. Courses in computer programming may not be used to fulfill this requirement.
  8. Mathematics 408C, 408D, 340L or 341, and one of the following: Mathematics 427K, 343K, 362K, 373K. Algebra courses at the level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics 301 without degree credit to remove their deficiency.
  9. Either Physics 303K, 303L, 103M, and 103N; or Physics 301, 101L, 316, and 116L.
  10. Philosophy 313K.
  11. Electrical Engineering 316.
  12. At least forty-two semester hours in computer sciences, consisting of Computer Sciences 307, 310, 315, 328, 336, 341, 345, 352, 372, and fifteen additional hours of approved upper-division coursework.
  13. At least forty-two semester hours of upper-division coursework.
  14. At least eighteen semester hours of upper-division coursework in computer sciences must be completed in residence at the University.
  15. Enough additional coursework to make a total of 130 semester hours.

Special Requirements

The student must fulfill the University-wide graduation requirements given in chapter 1 and the college requirements given in this chapter. He or she must also make a grade of at least C in each course used to fulfill requirements 8 and 12 of the prescribed work above and in Philosophy 313K and Electrical Engineering 316.

To enroll in any computer sciences course numbered above 336, all students must have completed the following courses with a grade of at least C in each: Computer Sciences 307, 310, 315, 328, 336, Mathematics 408C and 408D (or equivalent courses), and Philosophy 313K.

An undergraduate may not enroll in any computer sciences course more than once without written consent of an undergraduate adviser in computer sciences. No student may enroll in any computer sciences course more than twice. No student may take more than three upper-division computer sciences courses in a semester without written consent of an undergraduate adviser in computer sciences.

Order and Choice of Work

The student must consult the faculty adviser each semester regarding order and choice of work.

Bachelor of Science in Geological Sciences

The Bachelor of Science in Geological Sciences serves as a professional degree for students planning careers as geologists or teachers, as well as for those planning to pursue graduate work in the geosciences and related areas. Employment opportunities for students with this degree are dominated by the petroleum and related energy industries, but include the gamut of jobs that relate knowledge of the earth to resources, the environment, and human use of raw materials. When finite resources are in increasing demand, professional geologists trained to seek and develop raw materials serve a vital role in industrial society. Professional employment is also available in state and federal agencies, with consulting firms, and with service companies subsidiary to the energy and mineral industries. Careers include such areas as resource evaluation, environmental control, reclamation concerns, building foundation evaluation, groundwater contamination studies, soil testing, regional planning, watershed management, and mineral exploitation.

Students seeking the Bachelor of Science in Geological Sciences degree must choose one of four options--general geology, geophysics, hydrogeology/environmental geology, or teaching.

Prescribed Work Common to All Options

  1. Rhetoric and Composition 306 and English 316K. In addition, in taking courses to fulfill other degree requirements, the student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component; one of these courses must be upper-division. If the writing requirement is not fulfilled by courses specified for the degree, the student must fulfill it either with electives or with coursework taken in addition to the number of hours required for the degree. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.
  2. Courses 506 and 507 (or the equivalent) in a single foreign language, and a three-semester-hour course in the same language for which 507 or the equivalent is a prerequisite; or as much of this coursework as required by the student's score on the appropriate language placement test. Students in the teaching option are exempt from this requirement.

    For students who enter the University with fewer than two high school units in a single foreign language, the first two semesters in a language may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree.

  3. Six semester hours of American government, including Texas government.
  4. Six semester hours of American history.
  5. Three semester hours of coursework in economics, upper-division coursework in anthropology, or upper-division coursework in geography.
  6. Three semester hours in architecture, art (including art history, design, studio art, visual art studies), classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts, music (including music, instruments, ensemble), philosophy (excluding courses in logic), or theatre and dance.
  7. Thirty-six semester hours of upper-division coursework must be completed in residence at the University. For students in options I, II, and III, at least eighteen of these hours must be in geological sciences; for students in option IV, at least twelve hours must be in geological sciences. For all students, at least twelve of the thirty-six hours must be outside geological sciences.

Additional Prescribed Work for Each Option

Option I: General Geology

  1. Mathematics 408C and 408D, or 308K, 308L, and 308M. Algebra courses at the level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics 301 without degree credit to remove their deficiency.
  2. Physics 301, 101L, 316, and 116L; or Physics 303K, 103M, 303L, and 103N.
  3. Six semester hours of biology. Biology 211, 212, and 213 are suggested.
  4. Chemistry 301, 302, and 204.
  5. Geological Sciences 401 or 303 or 312K, 404C or 405, 416K, 416M, 420K, 422K, 426P, 428, 346C, 660, 468K, and enough additional approved upper-division coursework in geological sciences to make a total of forty-nine semester hours. [6]
  6. Nine semester hours chosen from the following courses: Aerospace Engineering 201, Civil Engineering 319F, 341, 357, 374K, Engineering Mechanics 311M, 319, Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 323, 424, 362, 365, 368, 369, and any course in aerospace engineering, architectural engineering, civil engineering, engineering mechanics, or mechanical engineering for which Engineering Mechanics 311M, 319, or Mathematics 427L is a prerequisite; any upper-division astronomy course for which Physics 316 and 116L are prerequisites; Biology 406D, 322 and 122L, 324 and 124L, 325, 126L, 226R, 226S, 226T, 327 and 127L, 328 and 128L, 448L, 349, 456L, 357, 262 and 262L, 363, 365R, 365S, 370, 373 and 373L, and 478L; Chemical Engineering 317, 322, and 353; Chemistry 610A, 610B, 210C, 353 and 153K, and any upper-division chemistry course for which Chemistry 610 or 353 is a prerequisite; Computer Sciences 307, 310, 315, and any upper-division computer sciences course for which Computer Sciences 315 is a prerequisite; Geography 334, 334C, 334K, 335C, 335K, 339, 356, 360L, 362K, and 366K; Geological Sciences 325K; Marine Science 440, 348, 352C, 354, 354C, and 354F; any upper-division mathematics course for which Mathematics 408D or the equivalent is a prerequisite; and any upper-division physics course except Physics 341.

    This requirement is intended to function as an unspecified minor. Courses used to fulfill the requirement do not have to be taken in the same department, but they should form a self-reinforcing sequence related to geological sciences. Courses not listed above will be considered upon petition to the undergraduate adviser.

  7. Enough additional coursework, outside geological sciences, to make a total of 126 semester hours.

Option II: Geophysics

  1. Mathematics 408C and 408D, or 308K, 308L, and 308M; 427K; and 427L. Algebra courses at the level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics 301 without degree credit to remove their deficiency.
  2. Physics 301, 101L, 315, 115L, 316, and 116L.
  3. Computer Sciences 303E.
  4. Chemistry 301 and 302.
  5. Geological Sciences 401 or 303 or 312K, 416K, 416M, 420K, 325K, 428, 354, 660 or an approved six-semester-hour geophysics field camp, 465K, and six additional approved hours of upper-division geological sciences. (Geological Sciences 365N is recommended.)
  6. Nine semester hours chosen from the following courses: Aerospace Engineering 366K, Astronomy 352K, 353, Chemistry 353, Civil Engineering 319F, 341, 357, 374K, Computer Sciences 303E, 313E, 323E, 324E, 326E, 327E, Electrical Engineering 411, 351K, 351L, 351M, Geography 335C, Mathematics 328K, 333L, 340L, 343K, 361, 361K, 362K, 364K, 364L, 365C, 365D, 367K, 367L, 368K, 372, 373K, 373L, 374, 374K, 378K, Mechanical Engineering 326, Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 322K, 323, 424, 368, Physics 333, 336K, 336L, 338K, 352K, 453, 362K, 362L, 369, 373, 474, 375P, and 375S.

    This requirement is intended to function as an unspecified minor. Courses used to fulfill the requirement do not have to be taken in the same department, but they should form a self-reinforcing sequence related to geological sciences. Courses not listed above will be considered upon petition to the undergraduate adviser. If the student chooses computer sciences courses to fulfill this requirement, these courses may also be counted toward a certificate in the elements of computing. The Elements of Computing Program is described in this chapter.

  7. Enough additional coursework to make a total of 126 semester hours.

Option III: Hydrogeology/Environmental Geology

  1. Mathematics 408C and 408D, or an equivalent calculus sequence, and 427K. Algebra courses at the level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics 301 without degree credit to remove their deficiency.
  2. Physics 301, 101L, 316, and 116L; or Physics 303K, 103M, 303L, and 103N.
  3. Chemistry 301, 302, and 204.
  4. Biology 211.
  5. Geological Sciences 401 or 303 or 312K, 416K, 416M, 420K, 428, 346C, 660 or 679J, 476K, 376M, and six additional approved hours of upper-division geological sciences. Geological Sciences 376L is strongly recommended.
  6. Nine semester hours chosen from the following courses: Biology 212 and 213, Chemistry 610A, 353, Civil Engineering 311S, 319F, 341, 357, 374K, Geography 334K, 335C, Marine Science 440, Mathematics 427L, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 326, Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 421K, 322K, 424, 326, and 368.

    This requirement is intended to function as an unspecified minor. Courses used to fulfill the requirement do not have to be taken in the same department, but they should form a self-reinforcing sequence related to geological sciences. Courses not listed above will be considered upon petition to the undergraduate adviser.

  7. Enough additional coursework to make a total of 126 semester hours.

Option IV: Teaching

This program is designed to fulfill the course requirements for certification as a secondary school teacher in Texas, but completion of the program does not guarantee the student's certification. For information about additional certification requirements, consult the UTeach program coordinator.

  1. In place of requirement 2 above, either two years of high school coursework in a single foreign language or course 506 (or the equivalent) in a foreign language.
  2. To fulfill requirement 5 above, students in the teaching option may complete three semester hours of lower-division or upper-division coursework in anthropology, economics, geography, linguistics, psychology, or sociology.
  3. Mathematics 408C. Algebra courses at the level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics 301 without degree credit to remove their deficiency.
  4. To fulfill requirement 6 above, students must complete History 329U or Philosophy 329U.
  5. Physics 302K, 102M, 302L, and 102N; or Physics 301, 101L, 316, and 116L.
  6. Biology 211, 212, 213, and 214; and Biology 205L, 206L, or 208L; and at least eight semester hours chosen from the following: Biology 320; 322 and 122L, or 324 and 124L; 325; 126L, with 226R, 226S, or 226T; 328 and 128L, or 349, or 361T; 357 or 373.
  7. Chemistry 301 and 302, and Chemistry 204 or 317.
  8. Geological Sciences 401 or 303 or 312K, 404C or 405, 416K, 416M, 420K or 320L, 335, and enough additional upper-division coursework in geological sciences to make a total of at least twenty-eight semester hours.
  9. Biology 370C (Topic: Research Methods), Chemistry 368 (Topic: Research Methods), or Physics 341 (Topic: Research Methods).
  10. Astronomy 303, 307, or 367M; and Marine Science 307.
  11. Eighteen semester hours of professional development coursework: Chemistry 107 (Topic: Step 1), Biology 101C (Topic: Step 2), Curriculum and Instruction 371 (Topic 21: Knowing and Learning in Math and Science), 371 (Topic 20: Classroom Interactions), 371 (Topic 22: Project-Based Instruction), Chemistry 107 (Topic: Special Topics Seminar), Curriculum and Instruction 667S.
  12. Enough additional coursework to make a total of 128 semester hours.

Special Requirements

The student must fulfill the University-wide graduation requirements given in chapter 1 and the college requirements given in this chapter. He or she must also make a grade of at least C in each course counted toward the degree. Geological sciences majors may not repeat any geological sciences course more than once without written consent of the undergraduate adviser.

To graduate, students who follow the teaching option must have a University grade point average of at least 2.50; to be recommended for certification, they must pass the final teaching portfolio review. For information about the portfolio review and additional teacher certification requirements, consult the UTeach program coordinator.



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Undergraduate catalog

Contents
Chapter 1 - The University
Chapter 2 - School of Architecture
Chapter 3 - Red McCombs School of Business
Chapter 4 - College of Communication
Chapter 5 - College of Education
Chapter 6 - College of Engineering
Chapter 7 - College of Fine Arts
Chapter 8 - College of Liberal Arts
Chapter 9 - College of Natural Sciences
Chapter 10 - School of Nursing
Chapter 11 - College of Pharmacy
Chapter 12 - School of Social Work
Chapter 13 - The Faculty
Texas Common Course Numbering System (Appendix A)
Appendix B


Related information

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Office of the Registrar
University of Texas at Austin

27 July 2000. Registrar's Web Team
Comments to rgcat@utxdp.dp.utexas.edu