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CONTENTS

CHAPTER 1
The University

CHAPTER 2
School of Architecture

CHAPTER 3
Red McCombs
School of Business


CHAPTER 4
College of Communication

CHAPTER 5
College of Education

CHAPTER 6
College of Engineering

CHAPTER 7
College of Fine Arts

CHAPTER 8
College of Liberal Arts

CHAPTER 9
College of
Natural Sciences


CHAPTER 10
School of Nursing

CHAPTER 11
College of Pharmacy

CHAPTER 12
School of Social Work

CHAPTER 13
The Faculty

Texas Common Course Numbering System
(Appendix A)

APPENDIX B
Degree and Course Abbreviations



     CHAPTER NINE CONTENTS
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Natural Sciences


continued


Courses

The faculty has approval to offer the following courses in the academic years 2000-2001 and 2001-2002; however, not all courses are taught each semester or summer session. Students should consult the Course Schedule to determine which courses and topics will be offered during a particular semester or summer session. The Course Schedule may also reflect changes that have been made to the courses listed here since this catalog was printed.

A full explanation of course numbers is given in General Information. In brief, the first digit of a course number indicates the semester hour value of the course. The second and third digits indicate the rank of the course: if they are 01 through 19, the course is of lower-division rank; if 20 through 79, of upper-division rank; if 80 through 99, of graduate rank.

Department of Geological Sciences

Prerequisites for the following courses are stated in terms of other University courses. A student with transfer credit for a course with similar content may be able to use that course to fulfill the prerequisite. A petition to do so may be filed in the department office.

Unless otherwise stated in the description below, each class meets for three lecture hours a week for one semester.

Geological Sciences: GEO

Lower-Division Courses

401. Physical Geology.
Nature, properties, and distribution of crustal materials; surficial processes; internal processes; origin of continents, oceans, and ocean basins; mineral and fuel resources. Three lecture hours and two hours of laboratory or fieldwork a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Geological Sciences 401, 303, 312K.

302D. Age of Dinosaurs.
An exploration of the general principles of natural history, focusing on the natural history of dinosaurs. An introduction to the basics of geology, anatomy, paleontology, and evolutionary theory, followed by the application of this knowledge, in tracing the evolutionary history of Dinosauria. Three lecture hours and one and one-half laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester only. May not be counted toward a degree in geological sciences.

302E. Earth, Wind, and Fire.
Designed for nonscience majors. Geologic phenomena that affect everyday life, including global warming, earthquakes, volcanism, desertification, river and coastline flooding and erosion, groundwater, mineral resources, and plate tectonics. Three lecture hours and one and one-half laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester only. May not be counted toward a degree in geological sciences. Geological Sciences 302E and 302K (Topic: Earth, Wind, and Fire) may not both be counted.

302K. Selected Topics in Geological Sciences.
Designed for nonscience majors. The impact of geological processes on human activity; geologic topics of popular interest. Three lecture hours and one and one-half laboratory hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. May not be counted toward a degree in geological sciences.

302M. The Age of Mammals.
Introductory-level course on paleontology and natural history for nonscience majors. Basic geological processes, fossilization, and the fossil record. Overview of the "tree of life". Summary of the evolution and diversification of mammals, an introduction to interactions between physical and biological processes, and the impact of climate change and human activities on mammalian communities. Laboratory component focuses on the mammalian skeleton and common Texas mammals. Three lecture hours and one and one-half laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester only. Geological Sciences 302K (Topic: The Age of Mammals) and 302M may not both be counted. May not be counted toward a degree in geological sciences.

302P. Living with a Planet.
Designed for nonscience majors. Environmental change on local and global scales, as a result of natural and anthropogenic causes. The history of the earth and its environment, water cycle, sediment cycle, atmosphere, and climate. Geological records of environmental change from billion-year to El Nino time scales. The human dimension of global change, including air and water pollution, desertification, deforestation, use of resources, global climate, loss of habitat, and the role of science in addressing these issues. Three lecture hours and one and one-half laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester only. Geological Sciences 302K (Topic: Living with a Planet) and 302P may not both be counted. May not be counted toward a degree in geological sciences.

303. Introduction to Geology.
Mineral and rock composition of the earth; measurement of geologic time; origin and evolution of life; earth's interior; plate tectonics; depositional environments and processes; ancient climates; humans, earth resources, and the environment. Two lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Geological Sciences 401, 303, 312K.

404C. Plate Tectonics and Earth History.
Application of plate tectonics to the origin and history of the earth's crust and the origin, evolution, and distribution of living organisms. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester only. Geological Sciences 404C and 405 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 401, 303, or 312K with a grade of at least C.

405. Life through Time.
The history and development of life, and the processes of change from the early Precambrian era to the present. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester only. Geological Sciences 404C and 405 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 401, 303, or 312K with a grade of at least C.

307. Introduction to Oceanography.
Same as Marine Science 307. Introduction to the sciences of oceanography: geological, physical, and biological. Two lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. May not be counted toward the Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in geological sciences, the Bachelor of Science in Geological Sciences (Option I), the Bachelor of Science in Geological Sciences (Option II), or the Bachelor of Science in Geological Sciences (Option III).

110C, 210C, 310C. Conference Course.
Supervised study of selected topics in geological sciences, by individual arrangement with the department and the instructor. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. May not be substituted for any required geological sciences course. Some topics are offered on the pass/fail basis only; these are identified in the Course Schedule. Prerequisite: Written consent of instructor.

211. Emerging Scholars in Geological Sciences.
Introduction to research areas in the geological sciences, with emphasis on the skills needed for success in graduate school and the professional workplace. Four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered irregularly. Offered on the pass/fail basis only. May not be substituted for any required geological sciences course. Prerequisite: Written consent of instructor.

312K. Geology of Engineering.
Geologic processes, conditions, materials, and history, and their importance in engineering problems. Two lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Geological Sciences 401, 303, 312K.

416K. Earth Materials.
Introduction to minerals, mineral study techniques, igneous and metamorphic rocks and ore deposits, and formation processes. Three lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester only. Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 401, 303, or 312K with a grade of at least C, Chemistry 301 with a grade of at least C, and credit with a grade of at least C or registration for Chemistry 302.

416M. Sedimentary Rocks.
Description and interpretation of sedimentary rocks in hand specimen and thin section; characteristics of sedimentary rocks deposited in different environments. Three lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 401, 303, or 312K with a grade of at least C.

119S, 219S, 319S, 419S, 519S, 619S, 719S, 819S, 919S. Topics in Geological Sciences.
This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Study Abroad Office. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Geological Sciences. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Upper-Division Courses

420K. Introduction to Field and Stratigraphic Methods.
For geological sciences majors. Field observation of geological processes and study of the mineralogy, petrology, stratigraphy, paleontology, and structural geology of central Texas. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester, and six weekend field trips. Normally offered in the spring semester only. Geological Sciences 420K and 320L may not both be counted. Prerequisite: For students seeking the Bachelor of Science in Geological Sciences, Geological Sciences 416K and 416M with a grade of at least C in each, and credit with a grade of at least C or registration for Geological Sciences 426P (or credit for 416L); for others, Geological Sciences 416K and 416M with a grade of at least C in each.

320L. Introductory Field Geology.
Study of geologic features and processes in the field, designed for nongeologists; emphasizes regional geology of central Texas and techniques of geologic mapping. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. Normally offered between the spring semester and the summer session only. Offered on the pass/fail basis only. Geological Sciences 420K and 320L may not both be counted. May not be counted toward the Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in geological sciences, the Bachelor of Science in Geological Sciences (Option I), the Bachelor of Science in Geological Sciences (Option II), or the Bachelor of Science in Geological Sciences (Option III). Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 401, 303, or 312K, or consent of instructor.

422K. Paleobiology.
Systematics, biostratigraphy, paleoecology, and evolution of fossil organisms. Three lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester only. Geological Sciences 422K and 322L may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 416M and six semester hours of biology, with a grade of at least C in each course.

322S. Development and Evolution of the Vertebrate Skeleton.
Designed for majors in geological sciences and associated fields of natural history. Introduction to the organization and development of the vertebrate skeleton; survey of vertebrate history. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester only, in alternate years. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

322V. Morphology of the Vertebrate Skeleton.
Identification of skeletal elements from the major vertebrate taxa, and aspects of skeletal functional morphology, with emphasis on extant taxa. Topics include the skeletal systems of fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester only, in alternate years. Only one of the following may be counted: Geological Sciences 322V, 371C (Topic: Morphology of the Vertebrate Skeleton), 389R, 391 (Topic: Morphology of the Vertebrate Skeleton). Prerequisite: Biology 214, Geological Sciences 404C, Geological Sciences 405, or the equivalent, or consent of instructor.

325K. Computational Methods in Geological Sciences.
Programming in appropriate computer languages, with applications to problems in geological sciences. Two lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester only. Prerequisite: Mathematics 408D or a college-level course in an appropriate computer programming language, or consent of instructor.

426P. Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology.
Mineralogy, geochemistry, and processes of magmatism and metamorphism. Three lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester only. Geological Sciences 416L and 426P may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 416K with a grade of at least C, and credit with a grade of at least C or registration for either Physics 301 and 101L or 303K and 103M.

428. Structural Geology.
Description, classification, and origin of earth structures. Solution of problems by descriptive geometry, geologic maps, and contouring. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester only. Prerequisite: For students pursuing the Bachelor of Science in Geological Sciences, Geological Sciences 420K with a grade of at least C, Physics 301 and 101L or 303K and 103M with a grade of at least C in each, and credit with a grade of at least C or registration for Mathematics 408C or 308K; for students pursuing the Bachelor of Arts with a major in geological sciences, Geological Sciences 420K with a grade of at least C and three semester hours of mathematics other than Mathematics 301, 316K, or 316L; for others, consent of instructor.

129S, 229S, 329S, 429S, 529S, 629S, 729S, 829S, 929S. Topics in Geological Sciences.
This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Study Abroad Office. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Geological Sciences. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

329W. Hydrogeology Cooperative (Geological Sciences).
This course covers the work period of geological sciences students in the Cooperative Education program, which provides supervised work experience by arrangement with the employer and the supervising instructor. The student must submit a final report to the supervising instructor at the conclusion of the program. Forty laboratory hours a week for one semester. The student must repeat the course each work period and must take it twice to receive credit toward the degree; at least one of these registrations must be during a long-session semester. No more than three semester hours may be counted toward the major requirement; no more than six semester hours may be counted toward the degree. The student's first registration must be on the pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: Application to become a member of the Hydrogeology Cooperative (Geological Sciences) Program and consent of the geological sciences undergraduate adviser.

330K. Petroleum Geology: Basin and Trend Analysis.
Attributes of the subsurface environment; fundamentals of petroleum generation, migration, entrapment, and producibility; and interpretation methods used in petroleum exploration. Two lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester only. Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 416M with a grade of at least C, and Physics 303L or 316.

331K. Petrology and Plate Tectonics.
Sedimentation, metamorphism, igneous activity, and deformation patterns at rift zones, subduction zones, and transform margins. Offered irregularly, as shown in the Course Schedule. Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 428 with a grade of at least C.

335. Geology and Mineral Resources of Texas.
Geologic history of the region; local rocks, fossils, and mineral resources; influence of physiography, surface and subsurface water supplies, and energy and mineral resource production on the state economy. Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour a week for one semester; local field trips may also be required. Normally offered in the fall semester only. May not be counted toward the Bachelor of Science in Geological Sciences (Option I), the Bachelor of Science in Geological Sciences (Option II), or the Bachelor of Science in Geological Sciences (Option III). Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; Geological Sciences 401, 303, or 312K; and Geological Sciences 404C or 405.

341. Mineral Resources.
Nature and origin of mineral deposits, their exploitation and conservation, and their importance in world affairs and world history. Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester only. Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 416M and 426P (or 416L) with a grade of at least C in each.

344K. Marine Mining and Minerals.
Same as Marine Science 344K. Overview of seafloor mineral deposits, their exploration and mining. May not be counted toward the Bachelor of Science in Geological Sciences degree. Offered irregularly, as shown in the Course Schedule. Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 401, 303, or 312K; 416K; and 416M.

346C. Environmental Hydrogeology.
Basic concepts of fluid flow, surface and subsurface hydrology, aqueous geochemistry, and fluid-rock interaction. Additional topics include isotope hydrogeology, evolution of seawater, and mineral-solution equilibrium. Prerequisite: Chemistry 302 and Mathematics 408C with a grade of at least C in each.

347K. Gems and Gem Minerals.
Crystallography, occurrence, and identification of gem minerals and materials; artificial gems; simple cutting and polishing; history of gems and gemology. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. May not be counted toward a degree in geological sciences. Prerequisite: For earth science teachers, consent of instructor; for others, Geological Sciences 401 or 303, and Chemistry 301 or one year of high school chemistry.

348K. Training Cruise(s): Marine Geophysical Research.
Same as Marine Science 348 (Topic 2: Marine Geophysical Research). Multiday cruise to collect seismic, magnetic, gravitational, bathymetric, or other geophysical data. Postcruise data processing and/or analysis and a report are required. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and one of the following: Marine Science 307, 367K, Geological Sciences 401, 303, 312K. Geological Sciences 416M, 420K or 320L, and 465K are recommended.

354. Global Geophysics.
Earth structure implied by gravity, seismicity, heat flow, and the magnetic field; crustal movements and their effect on the configuration of oceans and continents. Normally offered in the spring semester only. Prerequisite: Mathematics 408D with a grade of at least C; either Physics 303L and 103N or 316 and 116L with a grade of at least C in each; and Physics 315 and 115L with a grade of at least C in each, or consent of instructor.

358K. Volcanology.
Ash deposits, lava flows, eruption processes; prediction and mitigation of volcanic hazards. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered irregularly, as shown in the Course Schedule. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Geological Sciences 428.

660. Field Geology.
Methods of geologic mapping with topographic maps and aerial photographs. Field studies include measuring sections, interpretation of stratigraphy, structure, environments of deposition of various sedimentary rocks, and the origin and petrology of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Given for six weeks each summer in Colorado, New Mexico, and other western states. Normally offered in the summer session only. Prerequisite: Eighteen semester hours of geological sciences, including Geological Sciences 420K and 428 with a grade of at least C in each.

360K. Topics in Earth Science for Teachers.
Origin and history of the earth, its composition and physical processes, and the evolution of organisms. Emphasis on development of classroom activities and demonstrations. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester, with field trips. Offered irregularly. May not be counted toward a degree in geological sciences. Prerequisite: Six semester hours of upper-division science or experience in teaching science in secondary school.

360L. Earth Science for Teachers: Astronomy, Meteorology, and Oceanography.
The interdisciplinary nature of studying earth processes; the interplay among the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere. Includes field trips and laboratory investigations and experiments. Two lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered irregularly. May not be counted toward a degree in geological sciences. Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 360K or consent of instructor.

465K. Exploration Geophysics.
Quantitative study of geophysical exploration methods, including seismology, gravity, magnetism. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester only. Prerequisite: The following courses, with a grade of at least C in each: Mathematics 427K, 427L, Physics 315, 115L. (Students may register for Mathematics 427L concurrently.)

365N. Geophysical Data Processing.
Introduction to digital filtering and processing of geophysical data. Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester only. Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 465K or 468K with a grade of least C, or Mathematics 427L; a computer programming course; and additional coursework in elementary linear algebra and complex variables.

367K. Oceanography: Human Exploration and Exploitation of the Sea.
Same as Marine Science 367K. Review of major oceanographic expeditions; exploration of continental shelves and deep ocean; exploration and exploitation of marine resources, including energy, hard minerals, and food. Discussion of environmental concerns, the Exclusive Economic Zone, coastal development, marine pollution, dumping at sea, cable, pipelines, and seafloor utilization. May not be counted toward a degree in geological sciences. Prerequisite: Nine semester hours of science, including Chemistry 302 with a grade of at least C and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 303, 304, Geological Sciences 401, 303, 312K; and upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

468K. Geophysics for Geological Sciences Majors.
Wave motion principles and application to seismic exploration; magnetic, gravitational, and other geophysical methods. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester only. May not be counted toward the Bachelor of Science in Geological Sciences, Option II. Prerequisite: Mathematics 408D and either Physics 303L and 103N or 316 and 116L, with a grade of at least C in each.

370K. Sedimentology.
Processes of sediment formation, transportation, and deposition; textures, structures, and facies of sedimentary rocks. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, and two one-day field trips. Offered irregularly. Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 420K with a grade of at least C.

171C, 271C, 371C. Conference Course.
Supervised study of selected topics in geological sciences, by individual arrangement with the department and instructor. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. May not be substituted for any required geological sciences course. Prerequisite: Written consent of instructor.

376E. Environmental Isotope Geochemistry.
The application of the isotope and trace element geochemistry of natural waters and sediments to studies of the hydrologic cycle. Stable, radiogenic, and cosmogenic isotopes are used as tracers of the evolution of groundwater, surface water, and ocean water. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, with additional laboratory hours to be arranged. Offered irregularly. Geological Sciences 371C (Topic: Environmental Isotope Geochemistry) and 376E may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing in geological sciences; and consent of instructor or the following courses: Chemistry 302, 204, Geological Sciences 416K, 416M, 346C, Mathematics 408D, and Physics 303L and 103N or 316 and 116L.

476K. Groundwater Hydrology.
Introduction to subsurface hydrology, emphasizing geological controls on groundwater flow; quantitative methods of analyzing aquifer systems; regional hydrology; water quality and pollution. Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour a week for one semester, with several local field trips. Normally offered in the fall semester only. Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 346C or Mathematics 408D or consent of instructor.

376L. Field Methods in Groundwater Hydrology.
Introduction to field methods, including geophysics, pump tests, stream gauging, well-logging, water sampling, and mapping. An intensive three-week course meeting eight hours a day, Monday through Friday, and four hours on Saturday: lectures, laboratory exercises, and field exercises; nightly homework involving map exercises, reduction of field data, report preparation; Saturdays devoted to report presentation, review sessions, and local field trips. Offered between the spring semester and the summer session. Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 476K or consent of instructor.

376M. Chemical Hydrogeology.
An introduction to aqueous geochemistry and contaminant hydrogeochemistry; topics include basic thermodynamics, kinetics, rock-water interactions, and solute transport. Three lecture hours and one and one-half laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester only. Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 476K.

376S. Physical Hydrology.
Modern conceptual and methodological approaches to hydrological science: qualitative assessment of hydrological processes, quantitative representation, approaches to measurement, and treatment of uncertainty. Major components of the hydrological cycle precipitation, snow and snowmelt, infiltration, soil moisture, evapotranspiration, and runoff and their link to the coupled-earth system. Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 346C or Mathematics 408D.

679G. Special Studies in Geophysics.
Special research projects, fieldwork, or geophysical/industrial internship. Assigned reading, with written and oral report. Three lecture hours a week for two semesters. May be used instead of Geological Sciences 660 in fulfilling the requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Geological Sciences (Option II). Prerequisite: A grade point average in science of at least 3.00 and consent of instructor.

379H. Honors Tutorial Course.
Special studies project resulting in research report or honors thesis with oral defense of project. Conference course. May be counted as three of the six geological sciences senior elective hours. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, admission to the Geological Sciences Honors Program (which requires twelve semester hours of upper-division geological sciences, a grade point average in geological sciences of at least 3.50, and a University grade point average of at least 3.00), and consent of instructor.

679J. Internship in Hydrogeology.
Special hydrogeological studies under the joint supervision of industry professionals and faculty members. Students present a written report. Forty hours a week for one semester. May be used in place of Geological Sciences 660 in fulfilling the requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Geological Sciences (Option III). Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 476K, a grade point average in geological sciences of at least 3.00, and consent of instructor.

279K, 379K. Special Studies in Advanced Geological Sciences.
Special emphasis on recent developments. Conference course. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Six semester hours of advanced geological sciences, a grade point average in geological sciences of at least 3.00, a University grade point average of at least 3.00, and consent of instructor.



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Undergraduate catalog

Contents
Chapter 1 - The University
Chapter 2 - School of Architecture
Chapter 3 - Red McCombs School of Business
Chapter 4 - College of Communication
Chapter 5 - College of Education
Chapter 6 - College of Engineering
Chapter 7 - College of Fine Arts
Chapter 8 - College of Liberal Arts
Chapter 9 - College of Natural Sciences
Chapter 10 - School of Nursing
Chapter 11 - College of Pharmacy
Chapter 12 - School of Social Work
Chapter 13 - The Faculty
Texas Common Course Numbering System (Appendix A)
Appendix B


Related information

Catalogs
Course Schedules
Academic Calendars
Office of Admissions


Office of the Registrar
University of Texas at Austin

27 July 2000. Registrar's Web Team
Comments to rgcat@utxdp.dp.utexas.edu