UT Austin
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CONTENTS

CHAPTER 1
The University

CHAPTER 2
School of Architecture

CHAPTER 3
Red McCombs
School of Business


CHAPTER 4
College of Communication

CHAPTER 5
College of Education

CHAPTER 6
College of Engineering

CHAPTER 7
College of Fine Arts

CHAPTER 8
College of Liberal Arts

CHAPTER 9
College of
Natural Sciences


CHAPTER 10
School of Nursing

CHAPTER 11
College of Pharmacy

CHAPTER 12
School of Social Work

CHAPTER 13
The Faculty

Texas Common Course Numbering System
(Appendix A)

APPENDIX B
Degree and Course Abbreviations



     CHAPTER NINE CONTENTS
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Natural Sciences


continued


Courses

The faculty has approval to offer the following courses in the academic years 2000-2001 and 2001-2002; however, not all courses are taught each semester or summer session. Students should consult the Course Schedule to determine which courses and topics will be offered during a particular semester or summer session. The Course Schedule may also reflect changes that have been made to the courses listed here since this catalog was printed.

A full explanation of course numbers is given in General Information. In brief, the first digit of a course number indicates the semester hour value of the course. The second and third digits indicate the rank of the course: if they are 01 through 19, the course is of lower-division rank; if 20 through 79, of upper-division rank; if 80 through 99, of graduate rank.

Department of Mathematics

The Department of Mathematics offers a wide variety of courses to serve the needs of mathematics majors planning different careers and to serve the mathematical needs of students in other fields. Students majoring in mathematics should obtain a current copy of the Handbook for Students from the department. For help planning a program of study, students should consult an adviser in the Mathematics, Physics, and Astronomy Advising Center, Robert Lee Moore Hall 4.101.

A concentration in actuarial studies is available to students majoring in mathematics or another area. Typical programs include three to seven hours of actuarial foundations, twenty-eight hours of mathematics, and twelve hours of coursework in the Red McCombs School of Business. Detailed information is available from the director of actuarial studies in the Department of Mathematics.

Prerequisites

Most entry-level courses in the Department of Mathematics have as a prerequisite a specific minimum score on the SAT II: Mathematics Level IC test; therefore, many students planning to take a course in the department must first have taken the Mathematics Level IC test. See the current Course Schedule or consult the Advising Center for the minimum score required.

Important advice on which entry-level mathematics course to take, based on the student's score on the Mathematics Level IC test, is available from the Measurement and Evaluation Center and the Mathematics, Physics, and Astronomy Advising Center.

In courses that have a minimum test score or course grade as a prerequisite, students will be dropped from the course if University records do not show that they have met the prerequisite. Students for whom the Mathematics Level IC test score is required must be prepared to present proof of their test score after classes have begun.

Students who took the test at a College Board test center must use the official College Board score report as proof; students without the score report can obtain alternate proof from the Measurement and Evaluation Center. Students who took the test at the University must use the test-result slip as the written proof; information about where to obtain the test-result slip is given at the time of the test. Students who plan to use transfer credit to meet a prerequisite must submit a complete transcript to the Office of Admissions, so that the credit can be added to University records. In addition to sending a transcript, students are encouraged to bring a grade report to the Advising Center as proof.

Students who wish to enroll in conference courses in the Department of Mathematics must submit consent of instructor forms to the Department of Mathematics before registering. Forms are available in the department office and the Advising Center.

Unless otherwise stated in the description below, each class meets for three lecture hours a week for one semester.

Actuarial Foundations: ACF

Lower-Division Courses

309. Theory of Interest.
Measurement of interest, present value, accumulated value, annuities, amortization of loans, sinking funds, and bonds. Covers the interest-theory portion of the syllabus for exam #2 of the Society of Actuaries and the Casualty Actuarial Society. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Mathematics 408D.

110, 210, 310, 410. Conference Course.
Supervised study of selected topics, by individual arrangement with department and instructor. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Some sections are offered on the pass/fail basis only; these are identified in the Course Schedule. Prerequisite: Written consent of instructor.

110T. Conference Course: Texas Department of Insurance Internship.
Supervised internship at the Texas Department of Insurance. May be repeated for credit. Admission by application only. Students must apply to the director of the concentration in actuarial studies the semester before they take the course.

112K. Actuarial Laboratory on Calculus and Linear Algebra.
Problems and supplementary instruction in calculus, matrix algebra, and linear algebra, especially as required for the Society of Actuaries and Casualty Actuarial Society Exam 100. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Mathematics 408D with a grade of at least C, and credit or registration for Mathematics 341 (or 311) or 340L.

112L. Actuarial Laboratory on Interest Theory.
Problems and supplementary instruction in interest theory, especially as required for the Society of Actuaries Exam 140. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Actuarial Foundations 309 with a grade of at least C and consent of the director of the concentration in actuarial studies.

112M. Actuarial Laboratory on Probability and Statistics.
Problems and supplementary instruction in probability and statistics, especially as required for the Society of Actuaries and Casualty Actuarial Society Exam 110. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Mathematics 362K, credit or registration for Mathematics 378K, and consent of the director of the concentration in actuarial studies.

112N. Actuarial Laboratory on Life Contingencies.
Problems and supplementary instruction in actuarial mathematics and contingency theory, especially as required for the Society of Actuaries Exam 150. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Mathematics 469L, and consent of the director of the concentration in actuarial studies.

Mathematics: M

Lower-Division Courses

301. College Algebra.
Topics include a brief review of elementary algebra; linear, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic functions; polynomials; systems of linear equations; applications. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Usually offered only in the summer session. May not be counted toward the major requirement for the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I, degree with a major in mathematics or toward the Bachelor of Science in Mathematics degree. In some colleges of the University, Mathematics 301 may not be counted toward the Area C requirement or toward the total number of hours required for a degree. Credit for Mathematics 301 may not be earned after a student has received credit for any calculus course with a grade of C or better. Prerequisite: A passing score on the mathematics section of the Texas Academic Skills Program (TASP) test.

302. Introduction to Mathematics.
Intended primarily for general liberal arts students seeking knowledge of the nature of mathematics as well as training in mathematical thinking and problem solving. Topics include number theory and probability; additional topics are chosen by the instructor. Mathematics 302 and 303F may not both be counted. A student may not earn credit for Mathematics 302 after having received credit for any calculus course. May not be counted toward the major requirement for the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I, degree with a major in mathematics or toward the Bachelor of Science in Mathematics degree. May be used to fulfill the Area C requirement for the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I, degree or the mathematics requirement for the Bachelor of Arts, Plan II, degree. Prerequisite: Three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher, and a passing score on the mathematics section of the Texas Academic Skills Program (TASP) test.

303D. Applicable Mathematics.
An entry-level course for the nontechnical student, dealing with some of the techniques that allow mathematics to be applied to a variety of problems. Topics include linear and quadratic equations, systems of linear equations, matrices, probability, statistics, exponential and logarithmic functions, and mathematics of finance. Mathematics 303D and 303F may not both be counted. May not be counted toward the major requirement for the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I, degree with a major in mathematics or toward the Bachelor of Science in Mathematics degree. A student may not earn credit for Mathematics 303D after having received credit for Mathematics 305G or any calculus course. Prerequisite: A satisfactory score on the SAT II: Mathematics Level I or Level IC test, or Mathematics 301 with a grade of at least C.

403K. Calculus I for Business and Economics.
Differential and integral calculus of algebraic, logarithmic, and exponential functions with applications; introduction to mathematics of finance. Three lecture hours and two discussion sessions a week for one semester. May not be counted by students with credit for Mathematics 408C, 308K, or 308L. May not be counted toward the major requirement for the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I, degree with a major in mathematics or toward the Bachelor of Science in Mathematics degree. Prerequisite: A satisfactory score on the SAT II: Mathematics Level I or Level IC test, Mathematics 301 with a grade of at least B, or Mathematics 304E or 305G with a grade of at least C.

403L. Calculus II for Business and Economics.
Differential and integral calculus of functions of several variables with applications, infinite series, improper integrals; introductions to probability, differential equations, matrices, systems of linear equations, and linear programming. Three lecture hours and two discussion sessions a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Mathematics 403L, 408D, 308M. May not be counted toward the major requirement for the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I, degree with a major in mathematics or toward the Bachelor of Science in Mathematics degree. Prerequisite: Mathematics 403K, 408C, or 308L with a grade of at least C.

305G. Elementary Functions and Coordinate Geometry.
Study of elementary functions, their graphs and applications, including polynomial, rational, and algebraic functions, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. Mathematics 301, 305G, and equivalent courses may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I, degree with a major in mathematics or the Bachelor of Science in Mathematics degree. Credit for Mathematics 305G may not be earned after a student has received credit for any calculus course with a grade of C or better. Prerequisite: A satisfactory score on the SAT II: Mathematics Level I or Level IC test, or Mathematics 301 with a grade of at least C.

408C. Differential and Integral Calculus.
Certain sections are designated as honors sections for well-prepared students of mathematics and mathematically oriented sciences who wish to investigate more thoroughly the foundations of calculus. Introduction to the theory and applications of differential and integral calculus of functions of one variable; topics include limits, continuity, differentiation, the mean value theorem and its applications, integration, the fundamental theorem of calculus, and transcendental functions. Three lecture hours and two discussion hours a week for one semester. May not be counted by students with credit for Mathematics 403K, 308K, or 308L. Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics and a satisfactory score on the SAT II: Mathematics Level I or Level IC test, or Mathematics 305G with a grade of at least C.

408D. Sequences, Series, and Multivariable Calculus.
Certain sections are designated as honors sections for well-prepared students of mathematics and mathematically oriented sciences who wish to investigate more thoroughly the foundations of calculus. Introduction to the theory and applications of sequences and infinite series, including those involving functions of one variable, and to the theory and applications of differential and integral calculus of functions of several variables; topics include parametric equations, sequences, infinite series, power series, vectors, vector calculus, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, gradients, and multiple integrals. Three lecture hours and two discussion hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Mathematics 403L, 408D, 308M. Prerequisite: Mathematics 408C or the equivalent with a grade of at least C.

308K. Differential Calculus.
Introduction to the theory and applications of differential calculus of functions of one variable; topics include limits, continuity, differentiation, and the mean value theorem and its applications. This course is available for transfer credit but is not taught in residence. Only one of the following may be counted: Mathematics 403K, 408C, 308K.

308L. Integral Calculus.
Introduction to the theory and applications of integral calculus of functions of one variable; topics include integration, the fundamental theorem of calculus, transcendental functions, parametric equations, and sequences. Only one of the following may be counted: Mathematics 403K, 408C, 308L. Prerequisite: Mathematics 308K or the equivalent with a grade of at least C.

308M. Multivariable Calculus.
Introduction to the theory and applications of infinite series, including those involving functions of one variable, and to the theory and applications of differential and integral calculus of functions of several variables; topics include infinite series, power series, vectors, vector calculus, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, gradients, and multiple integrals. Certain sections are designated as honors sections for well-prepared students of mathematics and mathematically oriented sciences who wish to investigate more thoroughly the foundations of calculus. Only one of the following may be counted: Mathematics 403L, 408D, 308M. Prerequisite: Mathematics 308L or the equivalent with a grade of at least C.

110, 210, 310, 410. Conference Course.
Supervised study in mathematics, with hours to be arranged. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Some sections are offered on the pass/fail basis only; these are identified in the Course Schedule. Prerequisite: Written consent of instructor. Forms are available in the department office or in the Mathematics, Physics, and Astronomy Advising Center.

210E. Emerging Scholars Seminar.
Restricted to students in the Emerging Scholars Program. Supplemental problem-solving laboratory for precalculus, calculus, or advanced calculus courses for students in the Emerging Scholars Program. Three two-hour laboratory sessions a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit. Offered on the pass/fail basis only.

315C. Functions and Modeling.
Study in depth of topics in secondary school mathematics that are used in teaching precalculus and in the transition to calculus. Modeling with linear, exponential, and trigonometric functions; curve fitting; discrete and continuous models. Four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the UTeach program or consent of instructor.

316. Elementary Statistical Methods.
Graphical presentation, frequency functions, distribution functions, averages, standard deviation, variance, curve-fitting, and related topics. Only one of the following may be counted: Mathematics 316, 360K (Topic 1: Applications of Probability Theory), 362K. May not be counted toward the major requirement for the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I, degree with a major in mathematics or toward the Bachelor of Science in Mathematics degree. Prerequisite: A satisfactory score on the SAT II: Mathematics Level I or Level IC test, or Mathematics 301 with a grade of at least C.

316K. Foundations of Arithmetic.
An analysis, from an advanced perspective, of the concepts and algorithms of arithmetic, including sets; numbers; numeration systems; definitions, properties, and algorithms of arithmetic operations; and percents, ratios, and proportions. Problem solving is stressed. May not be counted toward the major requirement for the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I, degree with a major in mathematics or toward the Bachelor of Science in Mathematics degree. Credit for Mathematics 316K may not be earned after the student has received credit for any calculus course with a grade of C or better, unless the student is registered in the College of Education. Prerequisite: Mathematics 302, 303D, 305G, or 316 with a grade of at least C.

316L. Foundations of Geometry, Statistics, and Probability.
An analysis, from an advanced perspective, of the basic concepts and methods of geometry, statistics, and probability, including representation and analysis of data; discrete probability, random events, and conditional probability; measurement; and geometry as approached through similarity and congruence, through coordinates, and through transformations. Problem solving is stressed. May not be counted toward the major requirement for the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I, degree with a major in mathematics or toward the Bachelor of Science in Mathematics degree. Credit for Mathematics 316L may not be earned after the student has received credit for any calculus course with a grade of C or better, unless the student is registered in the College of Education. Prerequisite: Mathematics 316K with a grade of at least C.

318M. Introduction to Scientific Computing.
Introduction to the computer as a basic tool in the sciences, mathematics, and engineering. Fundamentals of computer hardware, operating systems, networks, algorithms, and software. Beginning programming in an advanced language. Introduction to applications of numerical methods and computation in the mathematical sciences. Prerequisite: Mathematics 408C or the equivalent with a grade of at least C.

119S, 219S, 319S, 419S, 519S, 619S, 719S, 819S, 919S. Topics in Mathematics.
This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Study Abroad Office. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Mathematics. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Upper-Division Courses

325K. Discrete Mathematics.
Provides a transition from the problem-solving approach of Mathematics 408C and 408D to the rigorous approach of advanced courses. Topics include logic, set theory, relations and functions, combinatorics, and graph theory and graph algorithms. Prerequisite: Mathematics 408D with a grade of at least C, or consent of instructor.

326K. Foundations of Number Systems.
Intended to provide future teachers with an understanding of certain concepts in school mathematics. Includes place value and arithmetic operations (including historical perspectives and analysis of both standard and nonstandard algorithms); prime factorization and other properties of integers; irrational and transcendental numbers; complex numbers; properties of polynomials; and connections of these topics with other areas of mathematics. Emphasis on conceptual understanding, developing both formal proofs and informal explanations, looking at concepts from multiple perspectives, and problem solving involving these topics. Prerequisite: Mathematics 408D or the equivalent with a grade of at least C.

427K. Advanced Calculus for Applications I.
Ordinary and partial differential equations and Fourier series. Five class hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Mathematics 408D with a grade of at least C.

427L. Advanced Calculus for Applications II.
Matrices, elements of vector analysis and calculus of functions of several variables, including gradient, divergence, and curl of a vector field, multiple integrals and chain rules, length and area, line and surface integrals, Green's theorems in the plane and space, and, if time permits, complex analysis. Five class hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Mathematics 408D with a grade of at least C.

328K. Introduction to Number Theory.
Provides a transition from the problem-solving approach of Mathematics 408C and 408D to the rigorous approach of advanced courses. Properties of the integers, divisibility, linear and quadratic forms, prime numbers, congruences and residues, quadratic reciprocity, number theoretic functions. Mathematics 328K and 360K (Topic 2: Number Theory) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Mathematics 341 (or 311) with a grade of at least C.

129S, 229S, 329S, 429S, 529S, 629S, 729S, 829S, 929S. Topics in Mathematics.
This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Study Abroad Office. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Mathematics. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

329W. Cooperative Mathematics.
This course covers the work period of mathematics students in the Cooperative Education program, which provides supervised work experience by arrangement with the employer and the supervising instructor. Forty laboratory hours a week for one semester. The student must repeat the course each work period and must take it twice to receive credit toward the degree; at least one of these registrations must be during a long-session semester. No more than three semester hours may be counted toward the major requirement; no more than six semester hours may be counted toward the degree. The student's first registration must be on the pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: Application through the College of Natural Sciences Career Services Office; Mathematics 408D; a grade of at least C in two of the following courses: Mathematics 325K, 427K, 341 (or 311), 362K, 378K; and consent of the undergraduate adviser.

333L. Structure of Modern Geometry.
Axiom systems, transformational geometry, introduction to non-Euclidean geometries, and other topics in geometry; use of these ideas in teaching geometry. Prerequisite: Mathematics 408D with a grade of at least C, or upper-division standing and consent of instructor.

439J. Probability Models with Actuarial Applications.
Probability models with actuarial applications, including Markov chains, Brownian motion, the Black-Scholes formula, frequency-of-loss and severity-of-loss random variables, compound distributions, and ruin theory. With Mathematics 339U and 439V, covers the syllabus for exam #3 of the Society of Actuaries and the Casualty Actuarial Society. Four lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Mathematics 362K.

339U. Actuarial Contingent Payments I.
Simulation of random samples; single-status models; present-value random variables for life insurance and annuities. With Mathematics 439J and 439V, covers the syllabus for exam #3 of the Society of Actuaries and the Casualty Actuarial Society. Prerequisite: Mathematics 362K. Actuarial Foundations 309 is recommended.

439V. Actuarial Contingent Payments II.
Mathematical analysis of insurance premiums, reserves, multiple-status survival models, multiple-decrement survival models; applications to such areas as life insurance and property/casualty insurance. With Mathematics 439J and 339U, covers the syllabus for exam #3 of the Society of Actuaries and the Casualty Actuarial Society. Four lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Mathematics 339U.

340L. Matrices and Matrix Calculations.
Techniques of matrix calculations and applications of linear algebra. Only one of the following may be counted: Mathematics 311, 340L, 341. Prerequisite: One semester of calculus with a grade of at least C or consent of instructor.

341. Linear Algebra and Matrix Theory.
Vector spaces, linear transformations, matrices, linear equations, determinants. Some emphasis on rigor and proofs. Only one of the following may be counted: Mathematics 311, 340L, 341. Mathematics majors are expected to take Mathematics 341 immediately after 408D. Prerequisite: Mathematics 408D with a grade of at least C.

343K. Introduction to Algebraic Structures.
Elementary properties of groups and rings, including symmetric groups, properties of the integers, polynomial rings, elementary field theory. Students who have received a grade of C or better in Mathematics 373K may not take Mathematics 343K. Prerequisite: Mathematics 341 (or 311) with a grade of at least C and either 325K or 328K with a grade of at least C.

343L. Applied Number Theory.
Basic properties of integers, including properties of prime numbers, congruences, and primitive roots. Introduction to finite fields and their vector spaces with applications to encryption systems and coding theory. Prerequisite: Mathematics 328K or 343K with a grade of at least C.

344K. Intermediate Symbolic Logic.
Same as Philosophy 344K. A second-semester course in symbolic logic: formal syntax and semantics, basic metatheory (soundness, completeness, compactness, and Lowenheim-Skolem theorems), and further topics in logic. Prerequisite: Philosophy 313K or consent of instructor.

346. Applied Linear Algebra.
Emphasis on diagonalization of linear operators and applications to dynamical systems and ordinary differential equations. Other subjects include inner products and orthogonality, normal mode expansions, vibrating strings and the wave equation, Fourier series and Fourier integrals, and Green's functions. Prerequisite: Mathematics 341 (or 311) or 340L with a grade of at least C.

348. Scientific Computation in Numerical Analysis.
Introduction to mathematical properties of numerical methods and their applications in computational science and engineering. Introduction to object-oriented programming in an advanced language. Study and use of numerical methods for solutions of linear systems of equations; nonlinear least-squares data fitting; numerical integration; and solutions of multidimensional nonlinear equations and systems of initial value ordinary differential equations. Prerequisite: Mathematics 318M, 427K, and 341 (or 311) or 340L with a grade of at least C.

349P. Actuarial Statistical Estimates.
Statistical estimates for frequency-of-loss and severity-of-loss random variables; credibility theory; statistics of simulation. Covers 40 percent of the syllabus for exam #4 of the Society of Actuaries and the Casualty Actuarial Society. Prerequisite: Mathematics 439J, and Mathematics 358K or 378K.

349T. Time Series and Survival-Model Estimation.
Introduction to the probabilistic and statistical properties of time series; parameter estimation and hypothesis testing for survival models. Covers 30 percent of the syllabus for exam #4 of the Society of Actuaries and the Casualty Actuarial Society. Prerequisite: Mathematics 339U, and Mathematics 358K or 378K.

358K. Applied Statistics.
Exploratory data analysis, correlation and regression, data collection, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. Prerequisite: Mathematics 362K with a grade of at least C.

360M. Mathematics as Problem Solving.
Discussion of heuristics, strategies, and methods of evaluating problem solving, and extensive practice in both group and individual problem solving. Communicating mathematics, reasoning, and connections among topics in mathematics are emphasized. Prerequisite: Mathematics 408D with a grade of at least C and written consent of instructor.

361. Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable.
Elementary theory and applications of analytic functions, series, contour integration, and conformal mappings. Prerequisite: Mathematics 427K or 427L with a grade of at least C or consent of instructor.

361K. Introduction to Real Analysis.
A rigorous treatment of the real number system, of real sequences, and of limits, continuity, derivatives, and integrals of real-valued functions of one real variable. Students who have received a grade of C or better in Mathematics 365C may not take Mathematics 361K. Prerequisite: Mathematics 341 (or 311) with a grade of at least C and either 325K or 328K with a grade of at least C.

362K. Probability I.
An introductory course in the mathematical theory of probability, fundamental to further work in probability and statistics. Only one of the following may be counted: Mathematics 316, 360K (Topic 1: Applications of Probability Theory), 362K. Prerequisite: Mathematics 408D with a grade of at least C.

362M. Introduction to Stochastic Processes.
Introduction to Markov chains, birth and death processes, and other topics. Prerequisite: Mathematics 362K with a grade of at least C.

364K. Vector and Tensor Analysis I.
Invariance, vector algebra and calculus, integral theorems, general coordinates, introductory differential geometry and tensor analysis, applications. Prerequisite: Mathematics 427K or 427L with a grade of at least C.

364L. Vector and Tensor Analysis II.
Continuation of Mathematics 364K, with emphasis on tensor and extensor analysis. Riemannian geometry and invariance. Prerequisite: Mathematics 364K with a grade of at least C.

365C. Real Analysis I.
A rigorous treatment of the real number system, Euclidean spaces, metric spaces, continuity of functions in metric spaces, differentiation and Riemann integration of real-valued functions of one real variable, and uniform convergence of sequences and series of functions. Students who have received a grade of C or better in Mathematics 365C may not take Mathematics 361K. Prerequisite: Mathematics 341 (or 311) with a grade of at least C and either 325K or 328K with a grade of at least C. Students who receive a grade of C in 325K or 328K are advised to take 361K before attempting 365C.

365D. Real Analysis II.
Recommended for students planning to undertake graduate work in mathematics. A rigorous treatment of selected topics in real analysis, such as Lebesgue integration, or multivariate integration and differential forms. Prerequisite: Mathematics 365C with a grade of at least C.

367K. Topology I.
An introduction to topology, including sets, functions, cardinal numbers, and the topology of metric spaces. Prerequisite: Mathematics 361K or 365C or consent of instructor.

367L. Topology II.
Various topics in topology, primarily of a geometric nature. Prerequisite: Mathematics 367K with a grade of at least C or consent of instructor.

368K. Numerical Methods for Applications.
Continuation of Mathematics 348. Topics include splines, orthogonal polynomials and smoothing of data, iterative solution of systems of linear equations, approximation of eigenvalues, two-point-boundary value problems, numerical approximation of partial differential equations, signal processing, optimization, and Monte Carlo methods. Only one of the following may be counted: Computer Sciences 367, Mathematics 368K, Physics 329. Prerequisite: Mathematics 348 with a grade of at least C.

372. Fourier Series and Boundary Value Problems.
Discussion of differential equations of mathematical physics and representation of solutions by Green's functions and eigenfunction expansions. Prerequisite: Mathematics 427K with a grade of at least C.

372K. Partial Differential Equations and Applications.
Partial differential equations as basic models of flows, diffusion, dispersion, and vibrations. Topics include first- and second-order partial differential equations and classification (particularly the wave, diffusion, and potential equations), and their origins in applications and properties of solutions. Includes the study of characteristics, maximum principles, Green's functions, eigenvalue problems, and Fourier expansion methods. Prerequisite: Mathematics 427K with a grade of at least C.

373K. Algebraic Structures I.
A study of groups, rings, and fields, including structure theory of finite groups, isomorphism theorems, polynomial rings, and principal ideal domains. Students who have received a grade of C or better in Mathematics 373K may not take Mathematics 343K. Prerequisite: Mathematics 341 (or 311) with a grade of at least C and either 325K or 328K with a grade of at least C, or consent of instructor. Students who receive a grade of C in Mathematics 325K or 328K are advised to take 343K before attempting 373K.

373L. Algebraic Structures II.
Recommended for students planning to undertake graduate work in mathematics. Topics from vector spaces and modules, including direct sum decompositions, dual spaces, canonical forms, and multilinear algebra. Prerequisite: Mathematics 373K with a grade of at least C.

374. Fourier and Laplace Transforms.
Operational properties and application of Laplace transforms; some properties of Fourier transforms. Prerequisite: Mathematics 427K with a grade of at least C.

374G. Linear Regression Analysis.
Fitting of linear models to data by the method of least squares, choosing best subsets of predictors, and related materials. Prerequisite: Mathematics 358K or 378K with a grade of at least C, Mathematics 341 or 340L, and consent of instructor.

374K. Fourier and Laplace Transforms.
Continuation of Mathematics 374. Introduction to other integral transforms, such as Hankel, Laguerre, Mellin, Z. Prerequisite: Mathematics 374 with a grade of at least C.

474M. Introduction to Mathematical Modeling and Industrial Mathematics.
Some of the problems encountered in current industry, and how mathematics can help solve them. Basic material in theory and computation of ordinary and partial differential equations, integral equations, calculus of variations and control theory. Specific industrial applications. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Mathematics 318M or the equivalent, Mathematics 427K, and Mathematics 341 (or 311) or 340L with a grade of at least C in each.

175, 275, 375, 475. Conference Course.
Supervised study in mathematics, with hours to be arranged. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing in mathematics and written consent of instructor.

375C. Conference Course (Computer-Assisted).
Supervised study in mathematics on material requiring use of computing resources, with hours to be arranged. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing in mathematics and written consent of instructor.

376C. Methods of Applied Mathematics.
Variational methods and related concepts from classical and modern applied mathematics. Model s of conduction and vibration that lead to systems of linear equations and ordinary differential equations, eigenvalue problems, initial and boundary value problems for partial differential equations. Topics may include a selection from diagonalization of matrices, eigenfunctions and minimization, asymptotics of eigenvalues, separation of variables, generalized solutions, and approximation methods. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Mathematics 318M or the equivalent, Mathematics 427K, and Mathematics 341 (or 311) or 340L with a grade of at least C in each.

378K. Introduction to Mathematical Statistics.
Estimation of parameters and testing of hypotheses. Mathematics 362K and 378K form the core sequence for students in statistics. Prerequisite: Mathematics 362K with a grade of at least C.

379H. Honors Tutorial Course.
Directed reading, research, and/or projects, under the supervision of a faculty member, leading to an honors thesis. Conference course. Prerequisite: Admission to the Mathematics Honors Program, a grade point average of at least 3.50 in Mathematics 365C and 373K, and approval of the honors adviser.



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Undergraduate catalog

Contents
Chapter 1 - The University
Chapter 2 - School of Architecture
Chapter 3 - Red McCombs School of Business
Chapter 4 - College of Communication
Chapter 5 - College of Education
Chapter 6 - College of Engineering
Chapter 7 - College of Fine Arts
Chapter 8 - College of Liberal Arts
Chapter 9 - College of Natural Sciences
Chapter 10 - School of Nursing
Chapter 11 - College of Pharmacy
Chapter 12 - School of Social Work
Chapter 13 - The Faculty
Texas Common Course Numbering System (Appendix A)
Appendix B


Related information

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University of Texas at Austin

27 July 2000. Registrar's Web Team
Comments to rgcat@utxdp.dp.utexas.edu