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Undergrad 02-04

CONTENTS

CHAPTER 1
The University

CHAPTER 2
School of Architecture

CHAPTER 3
Red McCombs
School of Business

CHAPTER 4
College of Communication

CHAPTER 5
College of Education

CHAPTER 6
College of Engineering

CHAPTER 7
College of Fine Arts

CHAPTER 8
College of Liberal Arts

CHAPTER 9
Graduate School of
Library and
Information Science

CHAPTER 10
College of
Natural Sciences

CHAPTER 11
School of Nursing

CHAPTER 12
College of Pharmacy

CHAPTER 13
School of Social Work

CHAPTER 14
The Faculty

Texas Common Course Numbering System
(Appendix A)

APPENDIX B
Degree and Course Abbreviations

 

    

6. College of Engineering

--continued

 

Degrees

To satisfy the course requirements for an engineering degree, a student must earn credit for all of the courses listed in the curriculum for that degree. The curricula leading to degrees in engineering include fifty semester hours of coursework common to all engineering plans.

All University curricula leading to bachelor's degrees in engineering except the biomedical engineering curriculum are accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). ABET sets minimum standards for engineering education, defined in terms of curriculum content, the quality of the faculty, and the adequacy of facilities. Graduation from an accredited program is an advantage when applying for membership in a professional society or for registration as a professional engineer.

Dual Degree Programs

Engineering/Biology Dual Degree Programs

A limited number of very strongly motivated students whose high school class standing and admission test scores indicate strong academic potential are admitted into one of the dual degree programs in biology and engineering. Two programs are available: the Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering combined with the Bachelor of Science in Biology (cell and molecular biology option), and the Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering combined with the Bachelor of Science in Biology (neurobiology option). Each program, offered jointly by the College of Engineering and College of Natural Sciences, provides students with a rigorous education in both engineering and biology that is designed to prepare them for graduate study in either discipline. The goal of each program is to provide the student with equal skill in engineering and biology and with a full understanding of the different problem-solving strategies of the two. Students may complete both degrees in five years if they register for fifteen to eighteen hours of coursework each semester.

Additional information is available from the College of Engineering Office of Student Affairs.

Engineering/Plan II Dual Degree Program

A limited number of students whose high school class standing and admission test scores indicate strong academic potential and motivation may pursue a curriculum leading to both a bachelor's degree in engineering and the Bachelor of Arts, Plan II. This dual degree option, offered jointly by the College of Engineering and the Plan II Honors Program of the College of Liberal Arts, provides the student with challenging liberal arts courses while he or she pursues a professional degree in engineering. Admission to this program requires at least two separate applications: one to the University and one to the Plan II Honors Program. If the student wishes to enter the First-Year Engineering Honors Program, he or she must submit an application to that program as well. Students should contact both the College of Engineering Office of Student Affairs and the Plan II office for more information on applications and early deadlines.

Dual Degree Program in Architectural Engineering and Architecture

A program that leads to both the Bachelor of Science in Architectural Engineering degree and the Bachelor of Architecture degree is available to qualified students. The program combines the course requirements of both degrees and requires six years for completion. Students who wish to pursue both degrees must apply for admission to the School of Architecture according to the procedures and deadlines established by the school. The program is described in chapter 2; additional information is available from the undergraduate adviser for architectural engineering.

Technical Area Options

Several engineering degree programs require a student to select a "technical area option" and to complete a specified number of courses in that area. Other degree programs do not require a student to specify a particular option but allow the student to choose courses either within an area of specialty or more broadly across technical areas. Although most options are designed to help the student develop greater competence in a particular aspect of the major, others permit the student to develop background knowledge in areas outside the major. In many cases, students who elect the latter options intend to continue their education in professional or graduate school; these options are particularly appropriate for students who plan to work in those interdisciplinary areas where the creation of new technology through research and development is very important.

Interdisciplinary Options

Interdisciplinary options are offered in the following areas: biomedical engineering (for chemical, electrical, and mechanical engineering majors), biotechnology (for chemical engineering majors), engineering management (for architectural, civil, and electrical engineering majors), environmemtal engineering (for chemical and civil engineering majors, materials science and engineering (for mechanical engineering majors), operations research and industrial engineering (for mechanical engineering majors), and product engineering (for chemical engineering majors). New interdisciplinary options are created in response to the changing needs of society; students who are interested in areas not mentioned above should contact the dean of the college for more information. Information about materials science is available from the director of the Materials Science and Engineering Program in Engineering Teaching Center 9.104.

Additional areas of concentration can be developed by selecting appropriate elective courses. For example, students in chemical engineering and mechanical engineering who wish to work in the area of petroleum and mineral resources may elect to take some courses in the Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering and the Department of Geological Sciences.

Preparation for Professional School

Technical area options also allow the student to fulfill the special course requirements for admission to professional schools. For more information, students should consult an adviser who is familiar with the admission requirements of the professional program in which they are interested.

Medical school. A properly constructed program in engineering provides excellent preparation for entering medical school. The engineer's strong background in mathematics and natural science--combined with a knowledge of such subjects as applied mechanics, fluid dynamics, heat transfer, thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, diffusion, and electricity and magnetism--enhance the mastery of many aspects of medical science. An engineering background is also useful to those who develop and use new instruments for detecting and monitoring medical abnormalities. The engineering/premedical programs described in this catalog usually afford opportunities to pursue alternative vocations for those who do not enter medical school. Medical school admission requirements for which engineering students may have to make special arrangements include eight semester hours of organic chemistry and fourteen semester hours in the life sciences. A competitive grade point average, a suitable score on the Medical College Admission Test, and letters of recommendation are requirements for admission to most medical schools. Arrangements for providing the necessary data must be completed during the summer preceding the student's senior year. Preliminary planning should be initiated early in the sophomore year. Students who intend to apply for admission to a medical school should contact the Health Professions Office, Geography Building 234, for information about admission requirements and application and test deadlines. Additional information about combining engineering and medical school requirements is available from the Department of Biomedical Engineering, Engineering-Science Building 610.

Dental school. Much of the information above about medical school applies also to dental school. All applicants must take the Dental Admission Test. Certain courses not taken by all engineers are also required, but these vary markedly from school to school. Students who are interested in dentistry can obtain specific information from the Health Professions Office.

Law school. Each year a few graduates, representing all engineering disciplines, elect to enter law school, where they find their training in careful and objective analysis is a distinct asset. Many of these students are preparing for careers in patent or corporate law that will enable them to draw on their combined knowledge of engineering and law. Others may not plan to use their engineering knowledge directly, but they still find that the discipline in logical reasoning acquired in an engineering education provides excellent preparation for the study of law. Students interested in admission to the law school of the University should consult the catalog of the School of Law.

Graduate study in business. Since many engineering graduates advance rapidly into positions of administrative responsibility, it is not surprising that they often elect to do graduate work in the area of business administration. In addition to an understanding of the technical aspects of manufacturing, the engineer has the facility with mathematics to master the quantitative methods of modern business administration.

Requirements for admission to graduate business programs are outlined in the catalog of the Graduate School. Many engineering departments offer technical area options that include business and management courses. These can be used with advantage by students who plan to do graduate-level work in business.

ABET Criteria

To be accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET), a degree plan of the College of Engineering must include the following

  1. One year of an appropriate combination of mathematics and basic sciences.
  2. One-half year of humanities and social sciences.
  3. One and one-half years of engineering topics and any requirements listed in ABET's Program Criteria for that program.

Although the degree plans that follow have been designed to meet these criteria, it is the student's responsibility, in consultation with the adviser, to choose elective courses that satisfy them. Courses in such subjects as accounting, industrial management, finance, and personnel administration; introductory language courses; and ROTC courses normally do not fulfill the humanities and social sciences requirement, regardless of their general value in the engineering program.

Liberal Education of Engineers

Courses in social sciences, humanities, and related nontechnical areas must be an integral part of all engineering degree programs, so that engineering graduates will be aware of their social responsibilities and the effects of technology on society. All degree programs must include the following nontechnical courses.

  1. Three semester hours of English composition (Rhetoric and Composition 306) and at least two courses, one of which must be upper-division, certified as having a substantial writing component.
  2. Six semester hours of American government (Government 310L and 312L, or equivalent courses that fulfill the legislative requirement described in chapter 1).
  3. Six semester hours of American history (History 315K and 315L, or equivalent courses that fulfill the legislative requirement described in chapter 1).
  4. Three semester hours of engineering communication (Chemical Engineering 333T, Civil Engineering 333T, Electrical Engineering 333T, Mechanical Engineering 333T, Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 333T, or another course approved by the department).
  5. Three semester hours of humanities (English 316K).
  6. Three semester hours of social science (anthropology, economics, geography, linguistics, psychology, or sociology).
  7. Three semester hours of fine arts or humanities (archaeology, architecture, art [excluding design and studio art], classics [including classical civilization, Greek, Latin], fine arts, humanities, music [excluding instruments and ensemble], philosophy [excluding courses in logic], or theatre and dance).

Courses used to satisfy requirements 6 and 7 must fulfill the ABET accreditation criteria given above as well as the University's basic education requirements. Lists of courses that fulfill these requirements are given below. Students preparing for the professional practice of engineering are encouraged to elect coursework in economics to fulfill requirement 6 and coursework in professional ethics to fulfill requirement 7.

Social Science Elective

Each student must complete three semester hours of coursework in anthropology, economics, geography, linguistics, psychology, or sociology. The following courses may be used to fulfill this requirement. Additional courses may be approved by the student's undergraduate adviser; to be counted toward the requirement, the course must be approved before the student enrolls in it.

Anthropology 302, Cultural Anthropology
Anthropology 318L, Mexican American Culture
Anthropology 322M, Topics in Cultures of the World
Anthropology 324L, Topics in Anthropology
Anthropology 327C, Topics in American Cultures
Economics 304K, Introduction to Microeconomics
Economics 304L, Introduction to Macroeconomics
Geography 305, This Human World: An Introduction to Geography
Geography 315, The City: An Introduction to Urban Geography
Geography 334, Conservation, Resources, and Technology
Geography 337, The Modern American City
Linguistics 306, Introduction to the Study of Language
Psychology 301, Introduction to Psychology
Sociology 302, Introduction to the Study of Society
Sociology 309, Chicanos in American Society
Sociology 333K, Sociology of Gender
Sociology 344, Racial and Ethnic Relations

Fine Arts/Humanities Elective

Each student must complete three semester hours of coursework in archaeology, architecture, art (excluding design and studio art), classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts, humanities, music (excluding instruments and ensemble), philosophy (excluding courses in logic), or theatre and dance. Architectural engineering majors must take an approved architecture history course to fulfill this requirement. Students in other fields may choose from the following courses. Additional courses may be approved by the student's undergraduate adviser; to be counted toward the requirement, the course must be approved before the student enrolls in it.

Architecture 308, Architecture and Society
Architecture 368R, Topics in the History of Architecture
Art History 301, Introduction to the Visual Arts
Art History 302, Survey of Ancient through Medieval Art
Art History 303, Survey of Renaissance through Modern Art
Classical Civilization 301, Introduction to Ancient Greece
Classical Civilization 302, Introduction to Ancient Rome
Classical Civilization 303, Introduction to Classical Mythology
Classical Civilization 305, Topics in Roman Civilization
Classical Civilization 306M, Introduction to Medical and Scientific Terminology
Humanities 350, Topics in the Humanities
Music 302L, An Introduction to Western Music
Music 303M, Introduction to Traditional Musics in World Cultures
Philosophy 301, Introduction to Philosophy
Philosophy 304, Contemporary Moral Problems
Philosophy 305, Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion
Philosophy 310, Knowledge and Reality
Philosophy 318, Introduction to Ethics
Philosophy 325K, Ethical Theories
Philosophy 325L, Business, Ethics, and Public Policy
Philosophy 327, Contemporary Philosophy
Theatre and Dance 301, Introduction to Theatre
Theatre and Dance 317C, Theatre History through the Eighteenth Century

Foreign Language Requirement

In accordance with the University's basic education requirements, all students must demonstrate proficiency in a foreign language equivalent to that shown by completion of two semesters of college coursework. Credit earned at the college level to achieve the proficiency may not be counted toward a degree. For a student admitted to the University as a freshman, this requirement is fulfilled by completion of the two high school units in a single foreign language that are required for admission; students admitted with a deficiency in foreign language must remove that deficiency as specified in General Information.

Writing Requirement

In accordance with the University's basic education requirements, all students must complete at least two courses, one of which must be upper-division, certified as having a substantial writing component. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule. The required work for each engineering degree plan includes courses that fulfill this requirement.

Applicability of Certain Courses

Physical Activity Courses

Physical activity (PED) courses are offered by the Department of Kinesiology and Health Education. They may not be counted toward a degree in the College of Engineering or toward the college's minimum course load requirement. However, they are counted among courses for which the student is enrolled, and the grades are included in the grade point average.

ROTC Courses

The dean, on the recommendation of the department chair, may substitute credit for air force science, military science, or naval science courses for other courses prescribed in an engineering degree program. Six semester hours of ROTC coursework may be substituted for three hours of American government and three hours of elective work. The elective for which an ROTC course is substituted must be approved by the student's major department. All ROTC students should consult their undergraduate adviser. The total number of semester hours required for the degree remains unchanged. Substitution is permitted only upon the student's completion of the last two years of ROTC coursework and receipt at the University of a commission in the service.

Correspondence and Extension Courses

Credit that a University student in residence earns simultaneously by correspondence or extension from the University or elsewhere or in residence or through distance education at another school will not be counted toward a degree in the College of Engineering unless specifically approved in advance by the dean. Application for this approval should be made on-line or at the Office of Student Affairs, Ernest Cockrell Jr. Hall 2.200. No more than twenty semester hours required for any degree offered in the College of Engineering may be taken by correspondence.

Requirements Included in All Engineering Degree Plans

Courses Semester Hours

American government, including Texas government 6

American history 6

English composition and literature
  Rhetoric and Composition 306, Rhetoric and Composition 3
 English 316K, Masterworks of Literature 3

Engineering communication
  Biomedical Engineering 333T, Chemical Engineering 333T, Civil Engineering 333T, Electrical Engineering 333T, Mechanical Engineering 333T, or Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 333T 3

Fine arts or humanities
  Three semester hours chosen from archaeology, architecture, art (excluding design and studio art), classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts, humanities, music (excluding instruments and ensemble), philosophy (excluding courses in logic), or theatre and dance[1] 3

Mathematics
  Mathematics 408C, Differential and Integral Calculus 4
  Mathematics 408D, Sequences, Series, and Multivariable Calculus 4
  Mathematics 427K, Advanced Calculus for Applications I 4

Social sciences
 Three semester hours in anthropology, economics, geography, linguistics, psychology, or sociology 3

Physics
  Physics 303K, Engineering Physics I 3
  Physics 103M, Laboratory for Physics 303K 1
 Physics 303L, Engineering Physics II 3
  Physics 103N, Laboratory for Physics 303L 1

Length of Degree Program

An eight-semester arrangement of courses leading to the bachelor's degree is given for each of the engineering degree plans. The exact order in which the courses are taken is not critical, as long as the prerequisite for each course is fulfilled. A student who registers for fewer than the indicated number of hours each semester will need more than eight semesters to complete the degree. The student is responsible for including in each semester's work any courses that are prerequisite to those he or she will take the following semester.

The first three semesters of all undergraduate engineering curricula contain many of the same courses. This commonality provides students with a certain amount of freedom to change degree plans without undue loss of credit.

 


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Undergraduate Catalog
Contents
Chapter 1 - The University
Chapter 2 - School of Architecture
Chapter 3 - Red McCombs School of Business
Chapter 4 - College of Communication
Chapter 5 - College of Education
Chapter 6 - College of Engineering
Chapter 7 - College of Fine Arts
Chapter 8 - College of Liberal Arts
Chapter 9 - Graduate School of Library and Information Science
Chapter 10 - College of Natural Sciences
Chapter 11 - School of Nursing
Chapter 12 - College of Pharmacy
Chapter 13 - School of Social Work
Chapter 14 - The Faculty
Texas Common Course Numbering System (Appendix A)
Appendix B - Degree and Course Abbreviations

Related Information
Catalogs
Course Schedules
Academic Calendars
Office of Admissions


Office of the Registrar
University of Texas at Austin

19 August 2002. Registrar's Web Team

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