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Undergrad 02-04

CONTENTS

CHAPTER 1
The University

CHAPTER 2
School of Architecture

CHAPTER 3
Red McCombs
School of Business

CHAPTER 4
College of Communication

CHAPTER 5
College of Education

CHAPTER 6
College of Engineering

CHAPTER 7
College of Fine Arts

CHAPTER 8
College of Liberal Arts

CHAPTER 9
Graduate School of
Library and
Information Science

CHAPTER 10
College of
Natural Sciences

CHAPTER 11
School of Nursing

CHAPTER 12
College of Pharmacy

CHAPTER 13
School of Social Work

CHAPTER 14
The Faculty

Texas Common Course Numbering System
(Appendix A)

APPENDIX B
Degree and Course Abbreviations

 

    

8. College of Liberal Arts

Courses

--continued

 

The faculty has approval to offer the following courses in the academic years 2002-2003 and 2003-2004; however, not all courses are taught each semester or summer session. Students should consult the Course Schedule to determine which courses and topics will be offered during a particular semester or summer session. The Course Schedule may also reflect changes made to the course inventory after the publication of this catalog.

A full explanation of course numbers is given in General Information. In brief, the first digit of a course number indicates the semester hour value of the course. The second and third digits indicate the rank of the course: if they are 01 through 19, the course is of lower-division rank; if 20 through 79, of upper-division rank; if 80 through 99, of graduate rank.

Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures

Before enrolling for the first time in any language offered by the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, all students with any knowledge of the language, however acquired, must take a placement test to determine the course for which they should register. Information on placement tests for Polish and Russian is available from the Measurement and Evaluation Center, 2616 Wichita. Information about testing in other languages is available from the department office.

The normal two-year sequence of lower-division courses in Russian is 506, 507, 412K, and 412L. In Czech, Polish, and Serbian/Croatian, it is 506, 507, 312K, and 312L.

Unless otherwise stated below, each course meets for three lecture hours a week for one semester.

Czech: CZ

Lower-Division Courses

506. First-Year Czech I.
Five class hours a week for one semester.

507. First-Year Czech II.
Five class hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Czech 506 or consent of instructor.

312K. Second-Year Czech I.
Prerequisite: Czech 507 or consent of instructor.

312L. Second-Year Czech II.
Prerequisite: Czech 312K or consent of instructor.

119S, 219S, 319S, 419S, 519S, 619S, 719S, 819S, 919S. Topics in Czech.
This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Study Abroad Office. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Upper-Division Courses

324. Topics in Czech Studies.
Study of a selected aspect or aspects of Czech culture: literature, theatre, film, visual arts, folklore. Readings and lectures in English. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. May not be used to fulfill the foreign language requirement for any degree. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

325. Third-Year Czech I.
Prerequisite: Czech 312L.

326. Third-Year Czech II.
Continuation of Czech 325. Prerequisite: Czech 325.

129S, 229S, 329S, 429S, 529S, 629S, 729S, 829S, 929S. Topics in Czech.
This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Study Abroad Office. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

330. Modern Czech Literature.
A study of Czech literature from the 1860s to the present; emphasis on translation from Czech into English. Czech 330 and Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies 325 (Topic: Modern Czech Literature) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

379. Conference Course in Czech Language or Literature.
May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Six semester hours of upper-division Czech, or upper-division standing and consent of instructor.

679H. Honors Tutorial Course.
Supervised individual research on a literary honors paper of some length. Conference course for two semesters. Must be taken for special honors in addition to the major requirement. Prerequisite: For 679HA, upper-division standing, a University grade point average of at least 3.00, and a grade point average in Czech of at least 3.50; for 679HB, Czech 679HA.

Polish: POL

Lower-Division Courses

506. First-Year Polish I.
Emphasis on four-skills proficiency. Five class hours a week for one semester.

507. First-Year Polish II.
Emphasis on four-skills proficiency. Five class hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Polish 506 or consent of instructor.

312K. Second-Year Polish I.
Emphasis on four-skills proficiency. Three class hours a week forone semester. Prerequisite: Polish 507 or consent of instructor.

312L. Second-Year Polish II.
Emphasis on four-skills proficiency. Three class hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Polish 312K or consent of instructor.

Upper-Division Courses

321. Introduction to the Polish Language I.
Designed to give students a rapid introduction to fundamentals of the language. Polish 320 and 321 may not both be counted. May not be used to fulfill the foreign language requirement for any bachelor's degree.

322. Introduction to the Polish Language II.
Continuation of Polish 321. Polish 322 and 340 may not both be counted. May not be used to fulfill the foreign language requirement for any bachelor's degree. Prerequisite: Polish 321 or consent of instructor.

324. Topics in Polish Studies.
Selected aspects of Polish history or culture. Readings and lectures in English. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. May not be used to fulfill the foreign language requirement for any degree. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: The Polish Experience. Same as Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies 325 (Topic 5: The Polish Experience). A historical, sociopolitical picture of Poland's complex cultural history. Polish 324 (Topic 1) and Slavic 323 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

379. Conference Course in Polish Language or Literature.
May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Six semester hours of upper-division Polish or consent of instructor.

Russian: RUS

Lower-Division Courses

804. Accelerated First-Year Russian.
Designed primarily for language majors. Covers the same material as Russian 506 and 507, but in one semester. Eight lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. May not be counted by students with credit for Russian 505S, 506, 506T, 507, or 507T.

505S. Intensive First-Year Russian I.
Intensive introduction to proficiency in four skills in Russian (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), in preparation for study abroad program. Thirteen and one-half class hours a week for the first summer term. Only one of the following may be counted: Russian 804, 505S, 506, 506T.

506. First-Year Russian I.
Five class hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Russian 804, 505S, 506, 506T.

506T. First-Year Russian for Special Purposes I.
Possible sections include Russian for science and technology and Russian for business. Five class hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Russian 804, 505S, 506, 506T.

507. First-Year Russian II.
Five class hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Russian 804, 507, 507T. Prerequisite: Russian 506 or 506T or appropriate score on Russian placement examination.

507T. First-Year Russian for Special Purposes II.
Possible sections include Russian for science and technology and Russian for business. Five class hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Russian 804, 507, 507T. Prerequisite: Russian 506, 506T, or appropriate score on Russian placement examination.

612. Accelerated Second-Year Russian.
Designed primarily for language majors. Covers the same material as Russian 412K and 412L, but in one semester. Six lecture hours a week for one semester. May not be counted by students with credit for Russian 412K (or 312K), 412L (or 312L), 312M, or 515S. Prerequisite: Russian 804, 507, 507T, or appropriate score on Russian placement examination.

412K. Second-Year Russian I.
Four lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Russian 612, 412K (or 312K), 312M. Prerequisite: Russian 804, 507, 507T, or appropriate score on Russian placement examination.

412L. Second-Year Russian II.
Four lecture hours a week for one semester. Russian 612, and 412L (or 312L) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Russian 412K (or 312K), 312M, or appropriate score on Russian placement examination.

312M. Second-Year Russian I--Technical.
Only one of the following may be counted: Russian 612, 412K (or 312K), 312M, 515S. Prerequisite: Russian 804, 507, 507T, or appropriate score on Russian placement examination.

515S. Intensive Second-Year Russian I.
Intensive extension and development of proficiency in four skills in Russian (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), in preparation for study abroad program. Thirteen and one-half class hours a week for the first summer term. Only one of the following may be counted: Russian 612, 412K (or 312K), 312M, 515S. Prerequisite: Russian 507, 507T, 804, or appropriate score on Russian placement examination.

316C. Masterworks of Russian Literature in Translation.
Introduction to the masterpieces of the Russian literary tradition in English translation, emphasizing cultural and social context. Conducted in English.

119S, 219S, 319S, 419S, 519S, 619S, 719S, 819S, 919S.Topics in Russian.
This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Study Abroad Office. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Upper-Division Courses

324. Advanced Russian I.
Oral expression, reading, and composition. Russian 324 and 525S may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Russian 612, 412L (or 312L), or appropriate score on Russian placement examination.

325. Advanced Russian II.
Oral expression, reading, and composition. Prerequisite: Russian 324 or appropriate score on Russian placement examination.

525S. Intensive Third-Year Russian I.
Intensive work in advanced composition and conversation skills in Russian, in preparation for study abroad program. Thirteen and one-half class hours a week for the first summer term. Russian 324 and 525S may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Russian 612, 412L (or 312L), or appropriate score on Russian placement examination.

326. Topics in Advanced Russian.
A fourth-year course designed to enhance the student's skills in a variety of functional areas. Topics may include advanced oral communication, stylistics, Russian for business, literary translation, translation of legal and business documents, scientific and technical translation. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Russian 325.

329. Survey of Original Texts in Russian Literature.
Introduction to the reading and analysis of original literary texts representing prose, poetry, and drama, with emphasis on each work's cultural and historical background. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Two years of coursework in Russian, or the equivalent.

129S, 229S, 329S, 429S, 529S, 629S, 729S, 829S, 929S. Topics in Russian.
This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Study Abroad Office. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

330. Topics in Russian Culture.
Study of a selected aspect or aspects of Russian culture, including theatre, film, visual arts, folklore. Readings and lectures in English. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. May not be used to fulfill the foreign language requirement for any bachelor's degree. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: Contemporary Russian Culture. Same as European Studies 361 (Topic 3: Contemporary Russian Culture). Prerequisite: Upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

356. Russian Literature in Translation.
A survey of nineteenth- and/or twentieth-century Russian literature. Lectures and readings in English. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. May not be used to fulfill the foreign language requirement for any bachelor's degree. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: The Russian Novel. Same as English 322 (Topic 37: The Russian Novel) and Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies 325 (Topic 9: The Russian Novel). Only one of the following may be counted: European Studies 361 (Topic: The Russian Novel), Russian 356 (Topic 1), Post-Soviet and East European Studies 325 (Topic: The Russian Novel). Prerequisite: For English majors, Rhetoric and Composition 306 and English 316K or their equivalents, and three additional semester hours of lower-division coursework in either English or rhetoric and composition; for others, upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

360. Study of an Individual Writer.
Readings in translation of selected works of one major Russian writer. Conducted in English. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. May not be used to fulfill the foreign language requirement for any bachelor's degree. Prerequisite: For English majors, Rhetoric and Composition 306 and English 316K or their equivalents, and three additional semester hours of lower-division coursework in either English or rhetoric and composition; for others, upper-division standing.

369. Topics in Russian Linguistics.
Introduction to selected topics in the structure or history of Russian. Conducted in English. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. May not be used to fulfill the foreign language requirement for any bachelor's degree. Prerequisite: Six semester hours of upper-division Russian or consent of instructor.

379. Conference Course in Russian Language or Literature.
May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Six semester hours of upper-division Russian or consent of instructor and the chair of the department.

679H. Honors Tutorial Course.
Supervised individual research on a literary or linguistic problem, which culminates in an honors paper of some length. Conference course for two semesters. Must be taken for special honors in addition to the major requirement. Prerequisite: For 679HA, upper-division standing, a University grade point average of at least 3.00, and a grade point average in Russian of at least 3.50; for 679HB, Russian 679HA.

Serbian/Croatian: S C

Lower-Division Courses

506. First-Year Serbian/Croatian I.
Emphasis on proficiency in four skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Five class hours a week for one semester.

507. First-Year Serbian/Croatian II.
Emphasis on proficiency in four skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Five class hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Serbian/Croatian 506 or consent of instructor.

312K. Second-Year Serbian/Croatian I.
Emphasis on proficiency in four skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Three class hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Serbian/Croatian 507 or consent of instructor.

312L. Second-Year Serbian/Croatian II.
Emphasis on proficiency in four skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Three class hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Serbian/Croatian 312K or consent of instructor.

Upper-Division Courses

321. Introduction to Serbian/Croatian I.
Designed to give qualified students a rapid introduction to the fundamentals of the language. Serbian/Croatian 321 and 372 may not both be counted. May not be used to fulfill the foreign language requirement for any bachelor's degree. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and fulfillment of the foreign language requirement for the Bachelor of Arts degree, or consent of instructor.

322. Introduction to Serbian/Croatian II.
Continuation of Serbian/Croatian 321. Designed to complete the student's study of the structure of the language and to introduce readings in Serbian and Croatian. Serbian/Croatian 322 and 375 may not both be counted. May not be used to fulfill the foreign language requirement for any bachelor's degree. Prerequisite: Serbian/Croatian 321 or consent of instructor.

379. Conference Course in Serbian/Croatian.
May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Serbian/Croatian 321 and 322 and consent of instructor.

Slavic: SLA

Lower-Division Courses

301. Introduction to Slavic Civilization.
Introduction to selected topics in the cultures of the Slavic peoples. Conducted in English. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. May not be used to fulfill the foreign language requirement for any bachelor's degree.

119S, 219S, 319S, 419S, 519S, 619S, 719S, 819S, 919S. Topics in Slavic.
This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Study Abroad Office. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Upper-Division Courses

320. Literature and Nationalism in the Balkans.
Same as European Studies 361 (Topic 8: Literature and Nationalism in the Balkans). Examination of the literary and political movements among the Balkan nationalities in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies 325 (Topic: Literature and Nationalism in the Balkans) and Slavic 320 may not both be counted. May not be counted toward fulfillment of the foreign language requirement for any bachelor's degree. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

321. The Jewish Experience in Eastern Europe.
A panorama of the sociocultural history of the Jews of Eastern Europe of the past three centuries. May not be counted toward fulfillment of the foreign language requirement for any bachelor's degree. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

324. Seminar on Slavic and East European Studies.
Examination of selected topics in the cultures and societies of Central and Eastern Europe. Conducted in English. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. May not be counted toward fulfillment of the foreign language requirement for any bachelor's degree. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: Jewish Folklore. Same as American Studies 322 (Topic 1: Jewish Folklore), Anthropology 325L (Topic 2: Jewish Folklore), English 325L (Topic 2: Jewish Folklore), Germanic Civilization 327E (Topic 1: Jewish Folklore), and Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures 341 (Topic 2: Jewish Folklore). Prerequisite: For English majors, Rhetoric and Composition 306 and English 316K or their equivalents, and three additional semester hours of lower-division coursework in either English or rhetoric and composition; for others, upper-division standing.

Topic 2: Yiddish Drama and Film in Translation. Same as English 322 (Topic 34: Yiddish Drama and Film in Translation); Germanic Civilization 327E (Topic 8: Yiddish Drama and Film in Translation); Jewish Studies 361 (Topic 5: Yiddish Drama and Film in Translation); and Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies 325 (Topic 8: Yiddish Drama and Film in Translation). Jewish life in Poland and Russia before the Holocaust, and the transition to American Jewish life, as revealed in plays and films produced in Eastern Europe and in the United States. No knowledge of Yiddish is required. Prerequisite: For English majors, Rhetoric and Composition 306 and English 316K or their equivalents, and three additional semester hours of lower-division coursework in either English or rhetoric and composition.; for others, upper-division standing.

325. Topics in Jewish Life and Culture in Eastern Europe.
Study of a selected aspect or aspects of Jewish life in Eastern Europe—literature, theatre, visual arts, folklore, religious movements—with emphasis on relationships with Slavic and other East European cultures. Readings and lectures in English. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. May not be counted toward fulfillment of the foreign language requirement for any bachelor's degree. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: The New York Jew: A Literary Archetype. Study of Russian Jewish immigrants from 1880 to 1990, and exploration of the question of whether there is a Jewish American literature. Prerequisite: For English majors, nine semester hours of lower-division English, including English 316K or the equivalent; for others, upper-division standing.

129S, 229S, 329S, 429S, 529S, 629S, 729S, 829S, 929S. Topics in Slavic.
This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Study Abroad Office. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

356. Slavic and East European Literatures in Translation.
The nineteenth and twentieth centuries: representative works, chiefly prose. Conducted in English. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. May not be used to fulfill the foreign language requirement for any bachelor's degree. Prerequisite: For English majors, Rhetoric and Composition 306 and English 316K or their equivalents, and three additional semester hours of lower-division coursework in either English or rhetoric and composition; for others, upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

379. Conference Course in Slavic and East European Languages and Literatures.
May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and consent of instructor.

 


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Undergraduate Catalog
Contents
Chapter 1 - The University
Chapter 2 - School of Architecture
Chapter 3 - Red McCombs School of Business
Chapter 4 - College of Communication
Chapter 5 - College of Education
Chapter 6 - College of Engineering
Chapter 7 - College of Fine Arts
Chapter 8 - College of Liberal Arts
Chapter 9 - Graduate School of Library and Information Science
Chapter 10 - College of Natural Sciences
Chapter 11 - School of Nursing
Chapter 12 - College of Pharmacy
Chapter 13 - School of Social Work
Chapter 14 - The Faculty
Texas Common Course Numbering System (Appendix A)
Appendix B

Related Information
Catalogs
Course Schedules
Academic Calendars
Office of Admissions


Office of the Registrar
University of Texas at Austin

19 August 2002. Registrar's Web Team

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