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Undergrad 02-04

CONTENTS

CHAPTER 1
The University

CHAPTER 2
School of Architecture

CHAPTER 3
Red McCombs
School of Business

CHAPTER 4
College of Communication

CHAPTER 5
College of Education

CHAPTER 6
College of Engineering

CHAPTER 7
College of Fine Arts

CHAPTER 8
College of Liberal Arts

CHAPTER 9
Graduate School of
Library and
Information Science

CHAPTER 10
College of
Natural Sciences

CHAPTER 11
School of Nursing

CHAPTER 12
College of Pharmacy

CHAPTER 13
School of Social Work

CHAPTER 14
The Faculty

Texas Common Course Numbering System
(Appendix A)

APPENDIX B
Degree and Course Abbreviations

 

    

10. College of Natural Sciences

--continued

 

Bachelor of Science in Mathematics

As an alternative to the Bachelor of Arts degree, the Bachelor of Science in Mathematics is designed with a twofold purpose: to offer students a more extensive scientific program that may better prepare them for graduate study or employment, and to recognize students who choose to pursue a more demanding program. Students are given the opportunity to develop greater breadth and depth in their mathematical programs as well as to combine mathematics with a concentration in another scientific discipline.

To accomplish these goals, the minimum number of semester hours is increased and the maximum limit is removed. Specialization in one additional scientific area is encouraged, and the foreign language requirement is shortened by one semester.

Students seeking the Bachelor of Science in Mathematics must select one of five options: actuarial science, applied mathematics, mathematical sciences, pure mathematics, and mathematics for secondary teaching. Students who choose the option in mathematical sciences must also select a specialization in either scientific computation or statistics, probability, and data analysis.

None of the following courses may be counted toward the degree: Mathematics 301, 302, 303D, 305G.

Prescribed Work Common to All Options

  1. Rhetoric and Composition 306 and English 316K. In addition, in taking courses to fulfill other degree requirements, the student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component; one of these courses must be upper-division. If the writing requirement is not fulfilled by courses specified for the degree, the student must fulfill it either with electives or with coursework taken in addition to the number of hours required for the degree. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.
  2. Courses 506 and 507 (or the equivalent) in a single foreign language, and a three-semester-hour course in the same language for which 507 is a prerequisite; or as much of this coursework as required by the student's score on the appropriate language placement test. For students who enter the University with fewer than two high school units in a single foreign language, the first two semesters in a language may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree.
  3. Six semester hours of American history.
  4. Six semester hours of American government, including Texas government.
  5. Three semester hours in anthropology, economics, geography, linguistics, psychology, or sociology.
  6. Eight semester hours in one of the following areas: astronomy, biology, chemistry, geological sciences, and physics.
  7. Six semester hours in architecture, classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts (including art history, design, ensemble, fine arts, instruments, music, studio art, theatre and dance, visual art studies), philosophy, or programs of special concentration. For students in the teaching option, three of these hours must consist of History 329U or Philosophy 329U. For students in the other options, three of these hours must be taken in architecture, classics, fine arts, or philosophy (excluding courses in logic).
  8. Mathematics 408C and 408D.
  9. Forty-two semester hours of upper-division coursework.
  10. At least six hours of upper-division coursework must be outside both mathematics and the subject areas listed in requirement 6. Philosophy courses in logic, computer sciences courses in discrete mathematics, and engineering courses may not be used to fulfill this requirement.
  11. Eighteen semester hours in mathematics must be completed in residence at the University.
  12. Enough additional coursework to make a total of 126 semester hours.

Additional Prescribed Work for Each Option

Option I: Actuarial Science

  1. Actuarial Foundations 309.
  2. Economics 304K, 304L, and 420K.
  3. Accounting 310F or both 311 and 312.
  4. Finance 357.
  5. At least thirty-two semester hours of upper-division coursework in mathematics and supporting areas, consisting of
    1. One of the following courses: Mathematics 328K, 343K, 361, 361K, 365C, 367K, 373K.
    2. Mathematics 340L or 341.
    3. Mathematics 362K and either 358K or 378K.
    4. At least three courses chosen from the following: Mathematics 439J, 339U, 439V, 349P, 349T.
    5. Enough additional coursework to provide a total of at least thirty-two hours. In addition to upper-division mathematics courses, the following courses in supporting areas may be counted toward this requirement: Finance 354, 367, Legal Environment of Business 320F, 323, Management Information Systems 325, 333, Risk Management 357E, 369K, 377. Courses used to satisfy this requirement may not be counted toward requirement 10 above.

Option II: Applied Mathematics

  1. Computer Sciences 303E or the equivalent.
  2. Thirty-two semester hours of upper-division coursework in mathematics, consisting of the following courses. The student should consult the applied mathematics adviser for information on other courses that may be counted toward this requirement.
    1. Mathematics 340L or 341.
    2. Mathematics 427K, 348, 362K, and 474M.
    3. Mathematics 361 and 365C.
    4. Mathematics 343K or 373K.
    5. Enough of the following coursework to provide a total of at least thirty-two hours: Mathematics 346, 365D, 368K, 372K, 376C.

Option III: Mathematical Sciences

Specialization in Statistics, Probability, and Data Analysis

  1. Computer Sciences 303E or the equivalent.
  2. At least thirty-two semester hours of upper-division coursework in mathematics and related areas, consisting of
    1. Mathematics 427K and 362K.
    2. Mathematics 340L or 341.
    3. Mathematics 361K or 365C.
    4. Mathematics 358K and 378K.
    5. Additional coursework chosen from the following: Civil Engineering 352, Computer Sciences 327E, Economics 341K, 350K (Topic 4: Advanced Econometrics), 354K, Electrical Engineering 366L, 379K (Topic 2: Quality and Reliability Engineering), 379K (Topic 15: Information Theory), Geography 360G, Management Information Systems 325, Mathematics 325K, 439J, 339U, 439V, 346, 348, 349P, 362M, 365D, 368K, 374G, 474M, Mechanical Engineering 366L, 367S, 279M (Topic: Modeling under Uncertainty), 279M (Topic: Operations Research: Optimization), Psychology 325K, Risk Management 357E, Statistics 376. Courses used to satisfy this requirement may not be counted toward requirement 10 above.
           Courses should be chosen in consultation with the specialization adviser to form a coherent program consistent with the student's background and goals. The student is responsible for meeting prerequisites and other requirements for enrollment in the courses he or she selects.

Specialization in Scientific Computation

Students who complete this specialization may simultaneously fulfill the requirements of the Elements of Computing Program and may apply to the director of that program for a certificate of completion.

  1. Computer Sciences 303E and 313E, or 307 and 315.
  2. At least thirty-two semester hours of upper-division coursework in mathematics and related areas, consisting of
    1. Mathematics 340L or 341.
    2. Mathematics 427K, 348, 362K, and 368K.
    3. Mathematics 361K or 365C.
    4. Additional coursework chosen from the following: Up to six hours of upper-division coursework in the Elements of Computing Program, Mathematics 427L, 343K, 346, 361, 365D, 372K, 373K, 474M, 376C. Courses used to satisfy this requirement may not be counted toward requirement 10 above.

Option IV: Pure Mathematics

  1. At least thirty-two semester hours of upper-division coursework in mathematics, consisting of
    1. Mathematics 340L or 341.
    2. Mathematics 427K, 361, 362K, 365C, and 373K.
    3. One of the following two-course sequences: Mathematics 427K and 372K, 358K and 378K, 362K and 339U, 362K and 439J, 348 and 368K, 365C and 365D, 367K and 367L, 373K and 373L.
    4. Additional hours of upper-division coursework in mathematics chosen with the approval of the mathematics adviser. Either Mathematics 343K or 361K may be counted toward this requirement, but not both.

Option V: Teaching

This program is designed to fulfill the course requirements for certification as a middle grades or secondary school mathematics teacher in Texas; however, completion of the program does not guarantee the student's certification. For information about additional certification requirements, consult the UTeach Natural Sciences academic adviser.

Students are encouraged to become familiar with a variety of mathematical software relevant to middle grades or secondary teaching, such as computer geometry systems, spreadsheets, and statistical software. Whenever possible, the student should take courses and sections of courses that use these types of software in place of those that do not.

  1. Mathematics 315C.
  2. Biology 370C (Topic: Research Methods); Chemistry 368 (Topic: Research Methods); or Physics 341 (Topic: Research Methods).
  3. At least thirty-two semester hours of upper-division coursework in mathematics, consisting of
    1. Mathematics 340L or 341.
    2. Mathematics 325K, 333L, 358K, and 362K.
    3. Mathematics 326K or 360M.
    4. Mathematics 361K or 365C.
    5. Mathematics 328K, 343K, or 373K.
    6. Mathematics 427K or 378K.
    7. Enough of the following coursework to provide a total of at least thirty-two semester hours: Mathematics 326K, 427K, 328K, 439J, 339U, 343K, 343L, 348, 360M, 361, 362M, 365C, 365D, 368K, 373K, 373L, 175, 378K. A course used to fulfill requirements 14a through 14f may not also be counted toward requirement 14g.
  4. A three-hour supporting course that uses mathematics but is in a field other than mathematics. The following courses may be used to fulfill this requirement: Architectural Engineering 323K, Astronomy 307, 352K, 352L, 358, 367M, Chemistry 301, 303, Civil Engineering 321, 341, 352, Computer Sciences 307, Economics 420K, 341K, 354K, Electrical Engineering 302, 366, 366L, Engineering Mechanics 314, Geological Sciences 346C, 354, 476K, Geography 360L, Government 341M, Human Development and Family Sciences 322, Mechanical Engineering 320, 326, 366L, 279M (Topic: Modeling under Uncertainty), 279M (Topic: Operations Research: Optimization), Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 310, Physics 301, 303K, 303L, Psychology 325K, 332, 334C, 345, Sociology 369L, Statistics 376. The supporting course may not also be counted toward requirements 2 through 7 of the prescribed work.
  5. Eighteen semester hours of professional development coursework: Curriculum and Instruction 667S, UTeach Natural Sciences 101, 110, 350, 355, 360, 170.
  6. Students seeking middle grades certification must complete the following courses: Educational Psychology 363M (Topic 3: Adolescent Development), or Psychology 301 and 304; and Curriculum and Instruction 371 (Topic 23: Reading, Writing, and Assessment across Disciplines).

Special Requirements

The student must fulfill the University-wide graduation requirements given in chapter 1 and the college requirements given in this chapter. He or she must also make a grade of at least C in Mathematics 408C and 408D and in each course completed at the University and counted toward the prescribed work requirements for his or her option.

To graduate and be recommended for certification, students who follow the teaching option must have a University grade point average of at least 2.50. They must earn a grade of at least C in each of the professional development courses listed in requirement 16 and must pass the final teaching portfolio review; those seeking middle grades certification must also earn a grade of at least C in each of the courses listed in requirement 17. For information about the portfolio review and additional teacher certification requirements, consult the UTeach Natural Sciences academic adviser.

Bachelor of Science in Nutrition

Option I: Nutrition

Sequences A and B in nutrition emphasize the science of nutrition and its application to the field of dietetics. They seek to develop in students an awareness of the economic, social, cultural, and psychological aspects of food and food habits as well as the scientific and managerial principles important in the provision of nutritional care.

Sequence A

This sequence is currently approved as a Didactic Program in Dietetics (DPD) by the American Dietetic Association (ADA) Council on Education Division of Education and Approval, a specialized accrediting body recognized by the Council on Postsecondary Accreditation and the United States Department of Education. Students who fulfill the requirements established by the ADA while completing sequence A will receive a DPD Verification Statement that allows them to apply for ADA-accredited dietetic internships or approved preprofessional practice programs. These requirements are a grade point average of at least 3.00 in nutrition and completion in residence of at least four upper-division nutrition courses and any accompanying laboratory courses.

By completing a dietetic internship or approved preprofessional practice program, the graduate of this degree program may qualify to become a member of the ADA and to write the qualifying examination to become a registered dietitian. Dietitians provide expertise in nutrition and foodservice management in a variety of settings, including clinics, hospitals, proprietary care centers, the armed services, public and private schools, university food services, research laboratories, commercial and industrial establishments, and public and privately funded health and wellness programs at the local, state, and federal levels.

Prescribed Work

  1. Rhetoric and Composition 306, English 316K, and a three-semester-hour course in communications chosen from a list available in the departmental office. In addition, in taking courses to fulfill other degree requirements, the student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component; one of these courses must be upper-division. If the writing requirement is not fulfilled by courses specified for the degree, the student must fulfill it either with electives or with coursework taken in addition to the number of hours required for the degree. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.
  2. Students who enter the University with fewer than two high school units in a single foreign language must take the first two semesters in a language without degree credit to remove their language deficiency.
  3. Six semester hours of American government, including Texas government; six semester hours of American history; Economics 304K or 304L; Psychology 301; and Sociology 302 or Anthropology 302.
  4. Three semester hours of statistics chosen from Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Educational Psychology 371, and Mathematics 316; and Mathematics 305G or 408C. Algebra courses at the level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics 301 without degree credit to remove their deficiency.
  5. Three semester hours in architecture, art (including art history, design, studio art, visual art studies), classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts, music (including music, instruments, ensemble), philosophy (excluding courses in logic), or theatre and dance.
  6. Chemistry 301, 302, 204, 610A, and 369; Biology 211, 416K, and 416L.
  7. Applied Learning and Development 320.
  8. Accounting 310F or 311, and Management 336.
  9. No fewer than forty-one but no more than forth-eight semester hours in the Department of Human Ecology, including Human Development and Family Sciences 313, 322, Nutrition 307, 107L, 311, 111L, 332, 334, 234L, 342, 142L, 344, 144M, 355M, 370, 170L, and one of the following: Nutrition 324 and 124L, 338W, 355, or 359H and 379H. With approval of the department chair, six of these hours may be chosen from related areas outside the Department of Human Ecology. Eighteen semester hours of this requirement must be completed in residence at the University.
  10. Thirty-six semester hours of upper-division coursework, of which at least eighteen must be within and at least twelve must be outside the Department of Human Ecology.
  11. Enough additional coursework to make a total of 126 semester hours.

Special Requirements

The student must fulfill the University-wide graduation requirements given in chapter 1 and the college requirements given in this chapter. He or she must also make a grade of at least C in all courses used to fulfill requirement 1 and requirements 3 through 9 of the prescribed work above.

Sequence B

This sequence prepares students for graduate study in nutrition. Graduates may seek employment in private or publicly funded research programs or, upon completion of graduate study, may engage in college or university teaching or nutrition research.

With careful selection of electives, students completing sequence B may meet the academic requirements of the American Dietetic Association and, with postbaccalaureate experience, may qualify to become members of the association and to write the examination to become a registered dietitian.

Prescribed Work

  1. Rhetoric and Composition 306, English 316K, and a three-semester-hour course in communications chosen from a list available in the departmental office. In addition, in taking courses to fulfill other degree requirements, the student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component; one of these courses must be upper-division. If the writing requirement is not fulfilled by courses specified for the degree, the student must fulfill it either with electives or with coursework taken in addition to the number of hours required for the degree. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.
  2. Students who enter the University with fewer than two high school units in a single foreign language must take the first two semesters in a language without degree credit to remove their language deficiency.
  3. Six semester hours of American government, including Texas government; six semester hours of American history; Psychology 301; and three semester hours chosen from the following courses: Anthropology 302, Economics 304K and 304L, and Sociology 302.
  4. Three semester hours of statistics chosen from Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Educational Psychology 371, and Mathematics 316; and Mathematics 305G or 408C. Algebra courses at the level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics 301 without degree credit to remove their deficiency.
  5. Three semester hours in architecture, art (including art history, design, studio art, visual art studies), classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts, music (including music, instruments, ensemble), philosophy (excluding courses in logic), or theatre and dance.
  6. Chemistry 301, 302, 204, 610A, 610B, 210C, 339K, and 339L; Biology 211, 212, 214, 325, 365R, and 365S; and one of the following laboratory courses: Chemistry 369L, Biology 325L, 331L.
  7. No fewer than thirty-nine but no more than forth-eight semester hours in the Department of Human Ecology, including Human Development and Family Sciences 313, 322, Nutrition 307, 107L, 311, 111L, 332, 342, 142L, 344, 144M, 370, and 170L; one of the following: Nutrition 324 and 124L, 338W, 355, or 359H and 379H; and three semester hours chosen from courses in family relationships, food systems management, and textiles and apparel. Six semester hours of chemistry for which Chemistry 302 is a prerequisite may be substituted for six of the required hours in the Department of Human Ecology. Eighteen semester hours of this requirement must be completed in residence at the University.
  8. Thirty-six semester hours of upper-division coursework, of which at least eighteen must be within and at least twelve must be outside the Department of Human Ecology.
  9. Enough additional coursework to make a total of 126 semester hours.

Special Requirements

The student must fulfill the University-wide graduation requirements given in chapter 1 and the college requirements given in this chapter. He or she must also make a grade of at least C in all courses used to fulfill requirement 1 and requirements 3 through 7 of the prescribed work above.

Option II: Coordinated Program in Dietetics

This option, in which academic and professional studies are integrated, is currently accredited by the American Dietetic Association (ADA) Council on Education Division of Education and Approval, a specialized accrediting body recognized by the Council on Postsecondary Accreditation and the United States Department of Education. With both didactic instruction and about one thousand hours of coordinated supervised practice, the program is designed for students who wish to enter the profession of dietetics. Graduates of the program immediately qualify for active membership in the ADA and to write the examination to become a registered dietitian. Dietitians provide expertise in nutrition and foodservice management in a variety of settings, including clinics, hospitals, proprietary care centers, the armed services, research laboratories, commercial and industrial establishments, and public and privately funded health and wellness programs at the local, state, and federal levels.

This is a professional program with limited enrollment. Admission is subject to the approval of an admissions panel. A formal application must be filed by February 20 for entry the following fall semester. Materials and directions for application to the program are available from the Department of Human Ecology.

A student's continuation in the program may be canceled by the admissions panel if the student fails to maintain a strong academic record or fails to enroll in and proceed through the sequence of program courses scheduled upon admission.

Prescribed Work

  1. Rhetoric and Composition 306, English 316K, and a three-semester-hour course in communications chosen from a list available in the departmental office. In addition, in taking courses to fulfill other degree requirements, the student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component; one of these courses must be upper-division. If the writing requirement is not fulfilled by courses specified for the degree, the student must fulfill it either with electives or with coursework taken in addition to the number of hours required for the degree. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.
  2. Students who enter the University with fewer than two high school units in a single foreign language must take the first two semesters in a language without degree credit to remove their language deficiency.
  3. Six semester hours of American government, including Texas government; six semester hours of American history; Economics 304K or 304L; Psychology 301; and Sociology 302 or Anthropology 302.
  4. Three semester hours of statistics chosen from Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Educational Psychology 371, and Mathematics 316; and Mathematics 305G or 408C. Algebra courses at the level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics 301 without degree credit to remove their deficiency.
  5. Three semester hours in architecture, art (including art history, design, studio art, visual art studies), classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts, music (including music, instruments, ensemble), philosophy (excluding courses in logic), or theatre and dance.
  6. Chemistry 301, 302, 204, 610A, and 369; Biology 211, 416K, and 416L.
  7. Applied Learning and Development 320, Nursing 310, or Educational Psychology 367.
  8. Accounting 310F or 311, Management 336, and three semester hours chosen from the following courses: Legal Environment of Business 320F, Finance 320F, Management 325, Marketing 320F, and 337.
  9. Fifty-two or fifty-four semester hours in the Department of Human Ecology, consisting of Human Development and Family Sciences 313, Nutrition 307, 107L, 311, 328C, 334, 234L, 342, 142L, 344, 144M, 145C, 352C, 355L, 668, 373, and 377K; either Nutrition 324 and 124L or 359H and 379H; and three semester hours chosen from courses in family and consumer economics, family relationships, or textiles and apparel. Eighteen semester hours of this requirement must be completed in residence at the University.
  10. Thirty-six semester hours of upper-division coursework, of which at least eighteen must be within and at least twelve must be outside the Department of Human Ecology.
  11. Enough additional coursework to make a total of 126 semester hours.

Special Requirements

The student must fulfill the University-wide graduation requirements given in chapter 1 and the college requirements given in this chapter. He or she must also make a grade of at least C in all courses used to fulfill requirement 1 and requirements 3 through 9 of the prescribed work above.

Order and Choice of Work

The student should consult the faculty adviser each semester regarding order and choice of work. Prerequisites should be checked carefully. The following courses should be taken in the indicated semester: third year, fall semester: Nutrition 145C; spring semester: Nutrition 328C, 668A; fourth year, fall semester: Nutrition 355L, 668B, 373, 377K; spring semester: Nutrition 352C. Because these courses are taught only once a year, a student who does not take them at the indicated time may be unable to complete the program.

 


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Undergraduate Catalog
Contents
Chapter 1 - The University
Chapter 2 - School of Architecture
Chapter 3 - Red McCombs School of Business
Chapter 4 - College of Communication
Chapter 5 - College of Education
Chapter 6 - College of Engineering
Chapter 7 - College of Fine Arts
Chapter 8 - College of Liberal Arts
Chapter 9 - Graduate School of Library and Information Science
Chapter 10 - College of Natural Sciences
Chapter 11 - School of Nursing
Chapter 12 - College of Pharmacy
Chapter 13 - School of Social Work
Chapter 14 - The Faculty
Texas Common Course Numbering System (Appendix A)
Appendix B - Degree and Course Abbreviations

Related Information
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Course Schedules
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Office of the Registrar
University of Texas at Austin

19 August 2002. Registrar's Web Team

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