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Undergrad 02-04

CONTENTS

CHAPTER 1
The University

CHAPTER 2
School of Architecture

CHAPTER 3
Red McCombs
School of Business

CHAPTER 4
College of Communication

CHAPTER 5
College of Education

CHAPTER 6
College of Engineering

CHAPTER 7
College of Fine Arts

CHAPTER 8
College of Liberal Arts

CHAPTER 9
Graduate School of
Library and
Information Science

CHAPTER 10
College of
Natural Sciences

CHAPTER 11
School of Nursing

CHAPTER 12
College of Pharmacy

CHAPTER 13
School of Social Work

CHAPTER 14
The Faculty

Texas Common Course Numbering System
(Appendix A)

APPENDIX B
Degree and Course Abbreviations

 

    

10. College of Natural Sciences

Courses

--continued

 

The faculty has approval to offer the following courses in the academic years 2002-2003 and 2003-2004; however, not all courses are taught each semester or summer session. Students should consult the Course Schedule to determine which courses and topics will be offered during a particular semester or summer session. The Course Schedule may also reflect changes that have been made to the course inventory after the publication of this catalog.

A full explanation of course numbers is given in General Information. In brief, the first digit of a course number indicates the semester hour value of the course. The second and third digits indicate the rank of the course: if they are 01 through 19, the course is of lower-division rank; if 20 through 79, of upper-division rank; if 80 through 99, of graduate rank.

Department of Physics

Unless otherwise stated below, each course meets for three lecture hours a week for one semester.

Physical Science: P S

Lower-Division Courses

303. Introductory Physical Science I: Mechanics and Heat.
Designed for students with minimum prior preparation in mathematics and physics. Especially appropriate for prospective elementary school teachers. Inquiry laboratory approach to basic concepts of measurement, forces, motion, energy, temperature, and heat. Four hours of integrated laboratory and lecture a week for one semester.

304. Introductory Physical Science II: Electricity, Light, and Optics.
Inquiry laboratory approach to electricity, magnetism, waves, light, and optical instruments. Four hours of integrated laboratory and lecture a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Physical Science 303.

Upper-Division Courses

350. Physical Science for Elementary and Middle School Teachers.
Designed for kindergarten through sixth grade teachers with minimal preparation in mathematics (college algebra) and no preparation in physics. An inquiry laboratory in the basic concepts of light, electricity, and magnetism. Three hours of integrated laboratory and lecture a day for three weeks.

367M. Physical Science: Methods of Astronomy. Same as Astronomy 367M.
An introductory, self-paced course in the methods of astronomy that emphasizes learning astronomical principles through observations. Six laboratory hours a week for one semester. May not be counted toward the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I, degree with a major in astronomy. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and nine semester hours of mathematics and/or science, including one of the following: Physical Science 303, 304, Astronomy 301, 302, 303. Equivalent preparation in mathematics, physics, chemistry, or earth sciences may be substituted with written approval of the instructor.

375. Individual Study in Physical Science.
Intended primarily for preservice and in-service teachers. Guided inquiry reading or laboratory research in physical science. Meets three times a week for one semester, for one hour each meeting. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and written consent of instructor.

Physics: PHY

Lower-Division Courses

301. Mechanics.
Designed for students who intend to major in science or mathematics. Only one of the following may be counted without prior approval of the department: Physics 301, 302K, 303K, 309K, 317K. Prerequisite: High school physics, Physics 306, or consent of the undergraduate adviser; Mathematics 408C or 308L; and credit or registration for Physics 101L.

101L. Laboratory for Physics 301.
Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted without prior approval of the department: Physics 101L, 102M, 103M, 117M. May not be counted toward a degree unless prerequisite is observed. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Physics 301.

302K. General Physics-Technical Course: Mechanics, Heat, and Sound.
Noncalculus technical course in physics. Only one of the following may be counted without prior approval of the department: Physics 301, 302K, 303K, 309K, 317K. Prerequisite: High school trigonometry or Mathematics 305G; and credit or registration for Physics 102M.

302L. General Physics-Technical Course: Electricity and Magnetism, Light, Atomic and Nuclear Physics.
Noncalculus technical course in physics. Only one of the following may be counted without prior approval of the department: Physics 302L, 303L, 309L, 316, 317L. Prerequisite: Physics 302K and 102M and credit or registration for Physics 102N.

102M. Laboratory for Physics 302K.
Two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted without prior approval of the department: Physics 101L, 102M, 103M, 117M. May not be counted toward a degree unless prerequisite is observed. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Physics 302K.

102N. Laboratory for Physics 302L.
Two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted without prior approval of the department: Physics 102N, 103N, 116L, 117N. May not be counted toward a degree unless prerequisite is observed. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Physics 302L.

303K. Engineering Physics I.
A general survey of physics; primarily laws of motion, heat, and wave phenomena. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. In most sections, examinations are given on Wednesday nights; see the Course Schedule for more information. Only one of the following may be counted without prior approval of the department: Physics 301, 302K, 303K, 309K, 317K. Prerequisite: Physics 306, a high school physics course, or consent of the undergraduate adviser; Mathematics 408C or 308L; and credit or registration for Physics 103M.

303L. Engineering Physics II.
Electricity and magnetism, optics, and atomic phenomena. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted without prior approval of the department: Physics 302L, 303L, 309L, 316, 317L. Prerequisite: Physics 303K and 103M, Mathematics 408D or 308L, and credit or registration for Physics 103N.

103M. Laboratory for Physics 303K.
Two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Physics 101L, 102M, 103M, 117M. May not be counted toward a degree unless prerequisite is observed. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Physics 303K.

103N. Laboratory for Physics 303L.
Two laboratory hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Physics 102N, 103N, 116L, 117N. May not be counted toward a degree unless prerequisite is observed. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Physics 303L.

104. Introductory Physics Seminar.
Suggested for beginning physics majors. Discussion of the development of important ideas in physics, with emphasis on their relevance to contemporary research. One lecture hour a week for one semester. Offered on the pass/fail basis only.

306. Elementary Physics Methods.
Designed for students who have not had high school physics, have weak problem-solving skills, and need preparation for Physics 301 or 303K. May not be counted toward any degree. Prerequisite: High school trigonometry or Mathematics 305G.

108. Introduction to Research.
Introductory laboratory experience; use of tools and test equipment; beginning apprenticeship in active physics research. One class hour a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit. Offered on the pass/fail basis only. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and approval of an undergraduate adviser.

309K. Elementary Physics for Nontechnical Students.
Designed for students who do not intend to do further work in natural sciences, engineering, mathematics, or medicine. Mechanics, heat, and sound. Only one of the following may be counted without prior approval of the department: Physics 301, 302K, 303K, 309K, 317K.

309L. Elementary Physics for Nontechnical Students.
Designed for students who do not intend to do further work in natural sciences, engineering, mathematics, or medicine. Electricity and magnetism, light, atomic and nuclear physics. Only one of the following may be counted without prior approval of the department: Physics 302L, 303L, 309L, 316, 317L. Prerequisite: Physics 309K.

110C. Conference Course.
Supervised study of selected topics in physics, by individual arrangement with department and instructor. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Some sections are offered on the pass/fail basis only; these are identified in the Course Schedule. Prerequisite: Written consent of instructor.

315. Wave Motion and Optics.
Study of general properties of waves; examples include sound, electromagnetic, and mechanical waves; special emphasis on light and optics. Prerequisite: Mathematics 427K, Physics 316 and 116L, and credit or registration for Physics 115L.

115L. Laboratory for Physics 315.
Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. May not be counted toward a degree unless prerequisite is observed. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Physics 315.

316. Electricity and Magnetism.
Only one of the following may be counted without prior approval of the department: Physics 302L, 303L, 309L, 316, 317L. Prerequisite: Physics 301 and 101L, Mathematics 408D or 308L, and credit or registration for Physics 116L.

116L. Laboratory for Physics 316.
Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted without prior approval of the department: Physics 102N, 103N, 116L, 117N. May not be counted toward a degree unless prerequisite is observed. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Physics 316.

317K. General Physics I.
An introductory course designed and recommended primarily for premedical students and others in the biomedical sciences whose professional or preprofessional training includes an introductory course in calculus. Mechanics, heat, and sound, with biomedical applications. Only one of the following may be counted without prior approval of the department: Physics 301, 302K, 303K, 309K, 317K. May not be counted toward the physics requirement for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Physics. Satisfies most medical and dental school requirements for physics. Prerequisite: Mathematics 408C and credit or registration for Physics 117M.

317L. General Physics II.
Designed and recommended primarily for premedical students and others in the biomedical sciences whose professional or preprofessional training includes an introductory course in calculus. Electricity and magnetism, light, atomic and molecular physics, nuclear physics, and their biomedical applications. Only one of the following may be counted without prior approval of the department: Physics 302L, 303L, 309L, 316, 317L. May not be counted toward the physics requirement for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Physics. Satisfies most medical and dental school requirements for physics. Prerequisite: Physics 317K and 117M and credit or registration for Physics 117N.

117M. Laboratory for Physics 317K.
Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted without prior approval of the department: Physics 101L, 102M, 103M, 117M. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Physics 317K.

117N. Laboratory for Physics 317L.
Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted without prior approval of the department: Physics 102N, 103N, 116L, 117N. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Physics 317L.

119S, 219S, 319S, 419S, 519S, 619S, 719S, 819S, 919S. Topics in Physics.
This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Study Abroad Office. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Physics. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Upper-Division Courses

329. Introduction to Computational Physics.
Computational methods for problem solving and research in physics; numerical analysis and computer simulation methods for physics applications using different types of computers. Only one of the following may be counted: Computer Sciences 367, Mathematics 368K, Physics 329. Prerequisite: Physics 315 and 115L, a programming course at the level of Computer Sciences 303E or consent of instructor, and credit or registration for Mathematics 341 (or 311) or 340L.

129S, 229S, 329S, 429S, 529S, 629S, 729S, 829S, 929S. Topics in Physics.
This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Study Abroad Office. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Physics. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

329W. Cooperative Physics.
This course covers the work period of physics students in the Cooperative Education Program, which provides supervised work experience by arrangement with the employer and the supervising instructor. Forty laboratory hours a week for one semester. The student must repeat the course each work period and must take it twice to receive credit toward the degree; at least one of these registrations must be during a long-session semester. No more than three semester hours may be counted toward the major requirement; no more than six semester hours may be counted toward the degree. The student's first registration must be on the pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: Application to become a member of the Cooperative Physics Program, Physics 316, and consent of the undergraduate adviser.

333. Modern Optics.
Review of geometrical optics, polarization, interference, and optical instruments. Topics include Fourier optics, light propagation in fibers, quantum optics, and coherence. Prerequisite: Physics 315 and 115L, Mathematics 427K, and credit or registration for Physics 133L.

133L. Laboratory for Physics 333.
Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Physics 333.

336K. Classical Dynamics I.
Elementary linear vector algebra, Newtonian mechanics, Lagrangian mechanics, central force motion, dynamics of rigid bodies, and theory of small oscillations. Prerequisite: Physics 315 and 115L, and Mathematics 427L or 364K.

336L. Fluid Dynamics.
Fundamental concepts of fluid mechanics developed and applied to laminar and turbulent flows. Topics include the Navier-Stokes equations, pipe and channel flow, drag, boundary layers, convection, and rotating fluids. Prerequisite: Physics 336K.

338K. Electronic Techniques.
Elementary circuit theory, amplifiers, feedback, pulse and digital techniques, signal processing, and microprocessors as applied to physics instrumentation. One and one-half lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Physics 316 and 116L and Mathematics 427K.

341. Selected Topics in Physics.
May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. May not be counted toward the Bachelor of Science in Physics degree without prior approval of the department. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, three semester hours of coursework in a natural science, and three semester hours of coursework in mathematics.

Topic 1: Energy Production.

Topic 2: Great Men, Moments, and Ideas.

Topic 3: Musical Acoustics.

Topic 4: The Nature of Things.

Topic 5: Pseudoscience.

Topic 6: Writing.

352K. Classical Electrodynamics.
Electrostatic fields, magnetostatic fields, derivation of Green's theorems and functions and of Maxwell's equations. Prerequisite: Physics 315 and 115L, and Mathematics 427L or 364K.

453. Modern Physics I: Introduction to Quantum Phenomena.
Breakdown of classical physics for microscopic phenomena; absorption and emission spectra, the photoelectric effect, blackbody radiation, models of the atom, Compton effect, X-ray diffraction; Planck's hypothesis; deBroglie's hypothesis; the probability interpretation; the one-dimensional Schrodinger equation; special relativity; the uncertainty relation. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Physics 315 and 115L, or consent of instructor.

355. Modern Physics for Engineers.
Modern physics, including relativity, quantum mechanics, and modern optics. Prerequisite: Physics 303L, 103N, and Mathematics 427K.

362K. Modern Physics III: Applications of Quantum Mechanics.
The two-electron atom; spin and statistics; coupling schemes for many-electron atoms; atoms and the radiation field; perturbation methods for decay and collisions; thermal, electrical, and magnetic properties of solids; free-electron metal and band theory; if time permits, selected topics such as superconductivity, Josephson tunneling, and others. Prerequisite: Physics 373.

362L. Modern Physics IV: Subatomic Physics.
Nuclei and nucleons, their gross properties; the hadrons; symmetries and conservation laws; nuclear stability; electromagnetic, weak, and hadronic interactions; nuclear reactions at low, medium, and high energies; nucleon structure; tools of experimental nuclear physics; models of theoretical nuclear physics; nuclear technology. Prerequisite: Physics 373; Physics 362K is recommended.

369. Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics.
Basic concepts of thermal physics; entropy, enthalpy, free energy, phase transitions, equilibrium distribution functions, applications. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Physics 373.

370C. Individual Study in Physics.
Supervised reading or research in physics. Hours to be arranged. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Some sections are offered on the pass/fail basis only; these are identified in the Course Schedule. Prerequisite: Physics 336K, credit or registration for Physics 352K, and consent of the undergraduate adviser.

670T. Senior Thesis.
Individual research with faculty supervision. First half involves preparation of proposal; second involves completion of written thesis. Six hours of work a week for one semester, or three hours of work a week for two semesters. Only three semester hours may be counted toward the Bachelor of Science in Physics degree. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and nine semester hours of upper-division physics.

373. Modern Physics II: Quantum Mechanics.
Postulates of quantum mechanics; the bound states of the finite square well, the harmonic oscillator, operator-eigenvalue formulism and selected examples, the hydrogen atom, angular momentum, rigid rotor, spin, and, if time permits, simple scattering theory. Prerequisite: Physics 336K and 453, or consent of instructor.

474. Advanced Laboratory I.
Modern experimental techniques, theory of error, and analysis of experiments; both modern and classical experiments in atomic and nuclear physics, electricity and magnetism, optics and heat. Three lecture hours and eight laboratory hours a week for one semester, with additional laboratory hours to be arranged. With consent of instructor, may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Physics 352K, 453, and some knowledge of electronics; Physics 338K is recommended.

375P. Introductory Plasma Physics.
Orbit theory and drifts, introduction to plasma stability and waves, applications to plasma confinement and heating. Prerequisite: Physics 352K and 369.

375R. Introduction to Relativity.
Overview of the special and general theories of relativity, with emphasis on recent developments in gravitation. Prerequisite: Physics 352K.

375S. Introductory Solid-State Physics.
Crystal structure, classification of solids, cohesion, thermal and electrical properties of solids, magnetic properties of solids, imperfections. Prerequisite: Physics 369 and 373.

379H. Honors Tutorial Course.
Research project, resulting in a thesis, for outstanding students electing to take the honors program in physics. Conference course. Prerequisite: A University grade point average of at least 3.00, a grade point average in physics of at least 3.50, twelve semester hours of upper-division physics, and consent of the honors adviser.

UTeach Natural Sciences

UTeach Natural Sciences: UTS

Unless otherwise stated below, each course meets for three lecture hours a week for one semester.

Lower-Division Courses

101. Secondary Teacher Education Preparation: STEP 1.
Introduction to mathematics, computer sciences, and science teaching as a career. Discussions include standards-based lesson design and various teaching and behavior management strategies. Fieldwork consists of planning and teaching four inquiry-based lessons to students in grades three to six in local elementary schools. One and one-half class honors a week for one semester; at least ten hours of fieldwork a semester are also required. Chemistry 107 (Topic: STEP 1-UTeach) and UTeach Natural Sciences 101 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Admission to the UTeach Natural Sciences program.

110. Secondary Teacher Education Preparation: STEP 2.
Topics may include routes to teacher certification in mathematics, computer sciences, and science teaching; various teaching methods that are designed to meet instructional goals; and learner outcomes. Students develop and teach three inquiry-based lessons in their field in a middle school, and participate in peer coaching. One and one-half class hours a week for one semester; at least twenty hours of fieldwork a semester are also required. Biology 101C (Topic: STEP 2) and UTeach Natural Sciences 110 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: UTeach Natural Sciences 101 or consent of the UTeach Natural Sciences academic adviser.

Upper-Division Courses

350. Knowing and Learning in Math and Science.
Same as Curriculum and Instruction 371 (Topic 21: Knowing and Learning in Math and Science). Three lecture hours a week for one semester; additional hours may be required. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, twelve semester hours of upper-division coursework in education, or consent of the UTeach Natural Sciences academic adviser.

355. Classroom Interactions.
Same as Curriculum and Instruction 371 (Topic 20: Classroom Interactions). Three lecture hours a week for one semester; additional hours may be required. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, twelve semester hours of upper-division coursework in education, or consent of the UTeach Natural Sciences academic adviser.

360. Project-Based Instruction.
Same as Curriculum and Instruction 371 (Topic 22: Project-Based Instruction). Three lecture hours a week for one semester; additional hours may be required. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, twelve semester hours of upper-division coursework in education, or consent of the UTeach Natural Sciences academic adviser.

170. Student Teaching Seminar.
Discussions include student teaching experiences, contemporary critical issues in education, and preparation for the state certification exam. One class hour a week for one semester. Chemistry 107 (Topic: Special Topics Seminar) and UTeach Natural Sciences 170 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in the appropriate section of Curriculum and Instruction 667S.

 


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Undergraduate Catalog
Contents
Chapter 1 - The University
Chapter 2 - School of Architecture
Chapter 3 - Red McCombs School of Business
Chapter 4 - College of Communication
Chapter 5 - College of Education
Chapter 6 - College of Engineering
Chapter 7 - College of Fine Arts
Chapter 8 - College of Liberal Arts
Chapter 9 - Graduate School of Library and Information Science
Chapter 10 - College of Natural Sciences
Chapter 11 - School of Nursing
Chapter 12 - College of Pharmacy
Chapter 13 - School of Social Work
Chapter 14 - The Faculty
Texas Common Course Numbering System (Appendix A)
Appendix B

Related Information
Catalogs
Course Schedules
Academic Calendars
Office of Admissions


Office of the Registrar
University of Texas at Austin

19 August 2002. Registrar's Web Team

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