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Undergrad 04-06

CONTENTS

CHAPTER 1
The University

CHAPTER 2
School of Architecture

CHAPTER 3
Red McCombs
School of Business

CHAPTER 4
College of Communication

CHAPTER 5
College of Education

CHAPTER 6
College of Engineering

CHAPTER 7
College of Fine Arts

CHAPTER 8
School of Information

CHAPTER 9
College of Liberal Arts

CHAPTER 10
College of
Natural Sciences

CHAPTER 11
School of Nursing

CHAPTER 12
College of Pharmacy

CHAPTER 13
School of Social Work

CHAPTER 14
The Faculty

Texas Common Course Numbering System
(Appendix A)

APPENDIX B
Degree and Course Abbreviations

 

    

1. The University

--continued

 

Simultaneous Majors

With proper approval, an undergraduate may pursue two majors simultaneously. The two majors may lead either to a single degree or to two degrees. For example, a student who majors simultaneously in history and government is awarded a single Bachelor of Arts degree; a student who majors simultaneously in journalism and government receives the Bachelor of Journalism and the Bachelor of Arts.

The student is admitted to the University with a single major. He or she may choose a second major after completing thirty semester hours of coursework in residence at the University. The student must follow any application procedures and meet any admission requirements that have been established for the second major; information about these and other relevant college policies is available from the dean.

Students with simultaneous majors must pay all applicable major-related fees for both fields, and they have the right to use the advising and student services provided by both colleges. Decisions about admission to programs, honors, scholastic probation, and dismissal are based independently on the criteria for each major.

A student who chooses to pursue two majors simultaneously is expected to take responsibility for his or her educational development. The student must know and abide by all policies of each of the colleges in which he or she is enrolled. The student must also know and meet the requirements of both degree programs, enroll in courses appropriate to both, meet prerequisites and take courses in the proper sequence, and seek advice from both colleges about degree requirements and other University policies when necessary.

Interdisciplinary Opportunities

Several of the majors listed in the section "Degree Programs" above are interdisciplinary in nature. The Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Engineering, for example, is offered by the College of Engineering but involves substantial coursework in the life and physical sciences; in the various area studies programs in the College of Liberal Arts, such as Latin American studies and Middle Eastern studies, students examine a geographic area from the viewpoints of several traditional disciplines.

In addition to interdisciplinary majors, the simultaneous major option described above, and the formal dual degree programs described later in this catalog, the University provides various ways for students to add breadth and diversity to their studies. Students pursuing the Bachelor of Arts may complete the requirements of one of the concentrations described in chapter 9; the concentrations are also open to students outside liberal arts and natural sciences with their deans' approval. The Study Abroad program, described in General Information, allows students to consider their own field from the unique viewpoint of another culture. The Bridging Disciplines Programs and other initiatives of Connexus: Connections in Undergraduate Education help students traverse the traditional boundaries between colleges and disciplines.

Cross-disciplinary initiatives of the colleges and schools are often described on their Web sites, which may be reached via http://www.utexas.edu/dept/.

Bridging Disciplines Programs

The Bridging Disciplines Programs (BDPs) are designed to complement a student's departmental major with an interdisciplinary specialization in one of the following areas: children and society; environment; ethics and leadership; population and public policy; cultures and identities; and technology and society. Students are encouraged to use the BDP theme to select and integrate degree requirements; to this end, courses taken to fulfill general education requirements may also count toward a BDP. Courses are drawn from disciplines across campus, including communication, liberal arts, natural sciences, businesses, and fine arts. Participation in faculty research and community internships is also central to the design of the Bridging Disciplines Programs.

The BDP initiative is administered by Connexus: Connections in Undergraduate Studies. While Bridging Disciplines Programs are open to undergraduates in all colleges and departments, interested students are encouraged to contact a Connexus adviser to discuss how the Bridging Disciplines Program will fit into specific degree plans.

Each BDP is guided by multidisciplinary faculty panel that sets policy, approves courses, and selects students. Admission to the Bridging Disciplines Programs is by application. Students must submit an application essay and a proposed program of work, which are reviewed by the faculty panel. Students who complete the requirements listed below will receive a certificate upon graduation.

The student must

  1. Complete the requirements of a departmental major or the equivalent.
  2. Complete nineteen to twenty-four semester hours of coursework, consisting of
    1. Freshman/Forum Seminar 118, Forum Seminar Series.
    2. Three to six hours of foundation coursework prescribed by the BDP faculty panel.
    3. Six to nine hours of coursework chosen from a list approved by the BDP faculty panel. Courses that are not on the list may be used with the consent of the faculty panel chair.
    4. Six to nine hours of approved research or internship coursework related to the BDP theme and the major.

Preprofessional Programs

Preparation for Dentistry, Medicine, Veterinary Medicine, Pharmacy, and Allied Health Professions

The rapid expansion and diversification of services designed to meet the health needs of society provide students with a variety of career opportunities in health care. However, since competition for admission to professional school programs is keen, it is important to maintain a strong academic record.

Advisory Services

Students interested in a health career should contact the Health Professions Office, Geography Building 234. The Health Professions Office maintains a Web page and a reference collection of professional school directories and related information on a broad spectrum of health careers. The office also sponsors programs on topics of interest throughout the year and maintains an e-mail distribution list. Individual course and career advising concerning preparation for admission to professional schools can be arranged through the Health Professions Office.

In general, professional schools do not indicate a preferred undergraduate major, leaving the student free to choose a degree program suited to his or her interests and abilities. The student should complete minimum professional school course requirements before taking a nationally standardized admission test such as the Dental Admission Test, Medical College Admission Test, Pharmacy College Admission Test, or Graduate Record Examinations. The Health Professions Office provides advice concerning courses that meet professional school admission requirements; advising for degree requirements is available in the student's major department. Students are encouraged to register using the special advising code appropriate to the health career they are pursuing.

A student planning to pursue a degree in clinical laboratory science, nursing, or dietetics at the University should consult an adviser in the appropriate department or school.

Preparation for Dentistry, Medicine, and Veterinary Medicine

Transfer of Professional School Coursework toward an Undergraduate Degree

All students preparing for professional training in dentistry, medicine, or veterinary medicine should plan to complete a baccalaureate degree in the field of their choice before entering professional school, since the number of students admitted without a degree is small.

If a preprofessional student undertakes work leading to an established undergraduate degree in the College of Liberal Arts or the College of Natural Sciences but is accepted into the professional school before finishing the degree, it may be possible by special petition for the student to use professional school coursework toward the degree as transfer hours. In this instance, to graduate the student must meet, without exception, all requirements for the degree. This includes all residence rules--both general and specific--for the desired degree, except as indicated in section 3 below. If the petition is approved, limited transfer of unspecified upper-division credit in chemistry and biology is allowed as applicable and necessary to the degree.

University regulations allow a student to transfer six of the last thirty semester hours from another undergraduate school if other residence requirements have been met. If a preprofessional student meets certain additional requirements as outlined below, it may be possible for the student to transfer and use toward the degree a limited number of semester hours from a professional school.

  1. The maximum number of hours allowed for transfer and application toward a University degree is
    1. Dental schools: A total of twelve semester hours of credit, of which nine hours are upper-division unspecified biology and three hours are upper-division unspecified chemistry.
    2. Medical schools (including schools of osteopathic medicine): A total of eighteen semester hours of credit, of which twelve hours are upper-division unspecified biology and six hours are upper-division unspecified chemistry.
    3. Veterinary schools: A total of twelve semester hours of upper-division unspecified biology.
  2. To be eligible to receive such transfer hours from a professional school the student must
    1. Receive dean's certification indicating completion in residence at the University of at least sixty semester hours counted toward the degree.
    2. Provide an official transcript indicating satisfactory completion of the traditional first year at an accredited and approved United States school of dentistry, medicine, or veterinary medicine. If eligible, the student may petition the academic dean to have the Office of Admissions record on the University transcript, without letter grade, the total number of semester hours transferred as noted above.
  3. After the student's eligibility is verified and the hours described in section 1 above are accepted for transfer to the University, degree credit may be granted as follows:
    1. Up to six of these hours may be used as appropriate and necessary toward a degree, as certified by the student's academic dean. These initial six semester hours must include all transfer work used within the last thirty semester hours counted toward the student's degree.
    2. Additional hours beyond the initial six, but limited to the total allowable, may be used as elective credit toward the degree upon written petition to and final approval of the student's academic dean.
    3. Additional hours beyond the initial six, but limited to the total allowable, may be used in fulfillment of specific requirements of the major and/or other required coursework for the degree upon written petition to and final approval of the student's academic dean, but only if the major department or the responsible degree program unit has endorsed the request.
Preparation for Dentistry

The minimum admission requirements for most Texas dental schools are two years of biological science, including at least one year of formal laboratory work, one year of general chemistry, one year of organic chemistry, one year of English, and one year of physics. Required courses must be college-level courses designed for science majors. All applicants to dental schools must take the Dental Admission Test (DAT) and submit their applications to the schools approximately one year in advance of planned entrance. For specific admission requirements, students should consult the most recent edition of Admissions Requirements of United States and Canadian Dental Schools and dental school Web sites or catalogs. Articles of current interest, admission statistics, and information on application procedures are available for reference in the Health Professions Office.

All students should plan to complete a bachelor's degree in the field of their choice before entering dental school, since the number of students admitted without a degree is small.

Preparation for Medicine

The minimum admission requirements for most Texas medical schools are two years of biological science, including at least one year of formal laboratory work, one-half year of calculus or statistics, one year of general chemistry, one year of organic chemistry, one year of English, and one year of physics. Required courses must be college-level courses designed for science majors. Applicants to medical schools must take the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) and submit their applications to the schools approximately one year in advance of planned entrance. For specific admission requirements, students should consult the most recent edition of Medical School Admission Requirements and medical school Web sites or catalogs. Articles of current interest, admission statistics, and information on application procedures are also available for reference in the Health Professions Office.

All students should plan to complete a bachelor's degree in the field of their choice before entering medical school, since the number of students admitted without a degree is small.

Preparation for Veterinary Medicine

Students seeking to prepare for a career in veterinary medicine must complete at least two years of required coursework, including biological science, chemistry, English, mathematics, and physics. Six to twelve months before planned entrance, all applicants to schools of veterinary medicine must take a nationally standardized test and submit their applications. Some schools require the Veterinary College Admission Test (VCAT), others the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) or the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT). For specific admission requirements, students should consult the most recent edition of Veterinary Medical School Admission Requirements and veterinary medical school Web sites or catalogs. Articles of current interest, admission statistics, and information on application procedures are available for reference in the Health Professions Office.

Preparation for Pharmacy

Admission requirements of professional pharmacy programs vary, but all require that the applicant have completed from thirty to seventy semester hours of prepharmacy coursework. The coursework generally includes one year of general chemistry, one year of organic chemistry, mathematics, one year of physics, one and one-half years of biological science, and one year of English; all required courses must be college-level courses designed for science majors. Applicants submit their applications to the professional schools six to nine months before planned entrance; some schools require applicants to take the Pharmacy College Admission Test (PCAT). For specific admission requirements, students should consult the most recent edition of Pharmacy School Admission Requirements and pharmacy school Web sites or catalogs. Articles of current interest, admission statistics, and information on application procedures are available for reference in the Health Professions Office.

Four of the eighty-four United States colleges of pharmacy are in Texas, at the University of Texas at Austin, the University of Houston, Texas Tech University, and Texas Southern University.

Preparation for the Allied Health Sciences

The allied health sciences include such programs as allied health education, biomedical communications, biomedical illustration, dental hygiene, dietetics, health care administration, health information management, clinical laboratory science, occupational therapy, physical therapy, physician's assistant, and rehabilitation technology.

Requirements for admission to allied health science programs vary greatly, but competition to enter many programs is keen. Some programs require sixty to ninety semester hours of college study prior to entrance into the professional school; others require completion of a baccalaureate degree prior to entrance. Application deadlines vary, but applications are usually submitted six to twelve months before planned entrance. Upon completion of the professional school program, students are awarded degrees and/or certificates of proficiency by the professional school. Most allied health sciences programs are not offered at the University; however, some students who complete their studies at a University of Texas School of Allied Health Sciences may be eligible or required to receive a baccalaureate degree jointly awarded by the University of Texas at Austin and a University of Texas School of Allied Health Sciences. If a student has received a baccalaureate or graduate degree from a University of Texas System general academic institution before enrolling at a University of Texas System health science center to pursue a second baccalaureate degree, the health science center awards the second degree. For additional information, consult a counselor in the Health Professions Office.

Information is also provided in the Health Professions Office about programs available, entrance requirements, admission statistics, application procedures, and required tests. Assistance is available in the selection of courses required by the program and the professional school of the student's choice.

Changes in admission requirements for allied health programs occur frequently. Therefore, students should consult a counselor in the Health Professions Office each semester.

Preparation for Law

Information about admission to the School of Law at the University is given in General Information and in the Law School Catalog.

There is no sequential arrangement of courses prescribed for a prelaw program; neither is any particular major specified. In discussing the objectives of prelegal education, the Association of American Law Schools puts special emphasis on comprehension and expression in words, critical understanding of the human institutions and values with which the law deals, and analytical power in thinking. The association suggests that courses relevant to these objectives are those dealing with the communication of ideas, logic and mathematics, the social sciences, history, philosophy, and the physical sciences. Some understanding of accounting principles is also recommended, although this may be gained after entrance to law school. For answers to specific questions about a prelaw program, the student should consult the prelaw adviser in his or her major department.

Services for prelaw students are also provided by Liberal Arts Career Services, Dorothy Gebauer Building 1.308. These include the annual fall law fair, information on how to research law schools, and assistance with the application procedure, including the personal statement. Prelaw students in all majors may consult the prelaw adviser in LACS. Additional information is available at http://www.lacs.utexas.edu/.

Like most schools offering professional training, the School of Law at the University has a number of specific requirements and limitations. For example, to be eligible for admission to the School of Law the student must have completed a baccalaureate degree. Students are admitted only at the beginning of the long session. Each applicant for admission must take the Law School Admission Test administered by the Law School Admission Services. This is usually taken in October of the senior year. The test score and undergraduate academic performance are important in determining eligibility for admission to law school; but all law schools consider a variety of factors in their admission policies, and no single factor by itself will guarantee admission or denial.

Preparation for Teacher Certification

Students who plan to teach in Texas public schools in the early grades must earn the Bachelor of Science in Applied Learning and Development in the College of Education and must meet the requirements for early childhood through grade four certification.

Students who plan to teach in Texas public schools in grades four through twelve must earn a bachelor's degree in the field they intend to teach and must meet the requirements for teacher certification. Students pursuing either middle grades or secondary math or science certification must follow the curriculum prescribed by the UTeach-Natural Sciences program. Students pursuing either middle grades or secondary certification in English language arts, social studies, or languages other than English must follow the curriculum prescribed by the UTeach-Liberal Arts program. Students pursuing other areas of certification should consult an adviser in the major department about degree requirements and an adviser in the College of Education about certification requirements.

Basic Education Requirements

The University strives to enroll exceptionally well-prepared, highly motivated students and to produce self-reliant graduates who are able to provide leadership and who do not simply react to events. The University must not only equip its graduates with occupational skills but also educate them broadly enough to enable them to adapt to and cope with the accelerated process of change occurring in business, professional, and social institutions today. Students must be exposed to a broad spectrum of arts and science, so that they may be educated beyond vocational requirements and thus be prepared for responsible citizenship in an increasingly complex world.

Every graduate of the University is expected to

  • be able to express himself or herself clearly and correctly in writing
  • be capable of reasoning effectively from hypotheses to conclusions and of logically analyzing the arguments of others
  • have a critical appreciation for the social framework in which we live and the ways it has evolved through time
  • have experience in thinking about moral and ethical problems
  • have an understanding of some facets of science and the ways in which knowledge of the universe is gained and applied
  • have an understanding of some aspects of mathematics and the application of quantitative skills to problem solving
  • have gained familiarity with a second language
  • have an appreciation for literature and the arts
  • be competent in the basic use of computers

The General Faculty of the University has established a basic education curriculum to assist undergraduates regardless of their major in acquiring the traits of an educated person; each college and school within the University has incorporated these requirements into its degrees. Within each discipline, the faculty defines and assesses student computer competence through learning activities that require the use of computers. Degree plans may require specific courses to fulfill basic education requirements; allow more options than indicated below to fulfill basic requirements; or require completion of further coursework in the component areas listed below. For these reasons, students should consult the descriptions of majors in chapters 2 through 13 for complete information on fulfillment of degree requirements.

In accordance with standards of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET), engineering majors may not count credit in applied fine arts or in mathematics below the level of calculus toward any degree requirement, including the basic education requirements

Music performance majors should see the basic education requirements for music performance programs given in chapter 7.

In accordance with standards of the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET), engineering majors may not count credit in applied fine arts or in mathematics below the level of calculus toward any degree requirement, including the basic education requirements.

Core Curriculum

The university's basic education requirements are consistent with statewide core curriculum guidelines and comprise the following component areas:

English composition: Three semester hours:

  • Rhetoric and Composition 306 (or 306Q for non-native speakers of English)

Substantial writing component: Six semester hours in courses that contain a substantial writing component, including at least three hours of upper-division coursework. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.

Literature: Three semester hours:

  • English 316K

American and Texas government: Six semester hours. This coursework also fulfills the legislative requirement given in chapter 1.

  • Government 310L and 312L
  • Government 105. This course is designed solely for out-of-state and other transfer students with five or more semester hours of coursework in Amercian government who need one hour in Texas government to fulfill the legislative requirement.

American history: Six semester hours, of which three may be in Texas history. The following courses may be used. This coursework also fulfills the legislative requirement given in chapter 1.

  • History 314K, 315K, 315L, 317L, 320L, 320P, 320R, 325P, 333L, 333M, 334L, 334M, 336L, 340S, 341N, 345J, 345L, 345M, 351P, 352R, 355F, 355M, 355N, 355P, 355S, 356K, 356N, 357C, 357D, 366R, 366S, and other courses identified in the Course Schedule.

Social science: Three semester hours. The following courses may be used:

  • Anthropology 301, 302, 304, 305, 307, 309L, 316L, 318L
  • Economics 304K, 304L
  • Geography 301C, 301K, 305, 306C, 308, 309, 312, 315, 319
  • Linguistics 306, 312, 315
  • Psychology 301, 304, 305, 308, 309, 317, 319K
  • Sociology 302, 308, 308C, 308D, 309, 313K, 317L, 317M, 318, 319

Mathematics: Three semester hours at the level of Mathematics 301 or higher. The following courses may be used:

  • Mathematics 301, 302, 303D, 403K, 305G, 408C, 408K, 316K

Natural science: Nine semester hours, consisting of six hours in one discipline and three hours in a second discipline. The following courses may be used:

  • Astronomy 301, 302, 303, or 307; 309; 309L; 309N or 309Q; 309P; 309Q or 309R; 309T
  • Biology 301C, 301D, 301L or 302 or 211, 301L or 303 or 214, 301M or 304 or 213, 305D,305E, 305F, 305G, 205L, 406D, 206L, 307D, 208L, 309D, 309E or 309F, 212, 416K, 416L, 318M
  • Chemistry 301, 302, 303, 304K, 305, 313N, 314N
  • Geological Sciences 401, 303, or 312K; 302C; 302D; 302E; 302K; 302M; 302P; 404C or 405; 307; 416K; 416M
  • Physical Science 303, 304
  • Physics 301, 302K, 303K, 309K, or 317K; 302L, 303L, 309L, 316, or 317L; 306

To fulfill the three-hour part of this requirement, the student may use the following courses in addition to those listed above:

  • Anthropology 301
  • Computer Sciences 301K, 302, 307, 315
  • Chemistry 310M, 318M
  • Geography 301C
  • Mathematics courses at the level of Mathematics 301 or higher, excluding courses used to fulfill the mathematics requirement
  • Physics 315

Fine arts: Three semester hours. The following courses may be used:

  • Architecture 308, 348
  • Art History 301, 302, 303
  • Ensemble 103L, 103P, 105, 106, 107J, 107K, 207L, 107S, 109C, 109K, 109L, 109P
  • Fine Arts 310
  • Music 201J, 201K, 302L, 302P, 303M, 303N, 303P, 606A, 307, 313
  • Philosophy 317K, 346
  • Studio Art 320K, 320L
  • Theatre and Dance 301, 102T, 303, 303C, 306, 112T, 315, 317C, 317D

Total core curriculum credit: Forty-two semester hours

Additional Basic Education Requirements

In addition to the core curriculum requirements above, undergraduate students are expected to enter the University having completed two years of study in a single foreign language in high school. Students without two years of high school foreign language coursework must earn credit for the second college-level course in a foreign language; this credit does not count toward the student's degree.

Coursework in the Graduate School and the School of Law

Graduate Work for Undergraduate Credit

An undergraduate may enroll in a graduate course under the following conditions:

  1. He or she must be an upper-division student and must fulfill the prerequisite for the course (except graduate standing).
  2. He or she must have a University grade point average of at least 3.00.
  3. He or she must receive the consent of the instructor of the course and of the graduate adviser for the field in which the course is offered. Some colleges and schools may also require the approval of the dean's office. Individual divisions may impose additional requirements or bar undergraduates from enrolling in graduate courses.
  4. Students in most colleges must have their dean's approval before they register for a graduate course.

Undergraduate students may not enroll in graduate courses that have fewer than five graduate students enrolled.

A graduate course taken by an undergraduate is counted toward the student's bachelor's degree in the same way that upper-division courses are counted, unless the course is reserved for graduate credit as described in the next section. Courses reserved for graduate credit may not also be used to fulfill the requirements of an undergraduate degree.

An undergraduate student enrolled in a graduate course is subject to all University regulations affecting undergraduates.

Reservation of Work by Undergraduates for Graduate Credit

Under the following conditions, a degree-seeking undergraduate may enroll in a graduate course and reserve that course for credit toward a graduate degree.

  1. The student must have a University grade point average of at least 3.00.
  2. The student must have completed at least ninety semester hours of coursework toward an undergraduate degree.
  3. The student may not register for more than fifteen semester hours in the semester or for more than twelve semester hours in the summer session in which thecourse is reserved.
  4. No more than twelve semester hours may be reserved for graduate credit.
  5. All courses reserved for graduate credit must be approved by the twelfth class day of the semester or the fourth class day of the summer session by the course instructor, the student's undergraduate adviser, the graduate adviser in the student's proposed graduate major area, the dean of the student's undergraduate college, and the graduate dean. A form for this purpose is available in the Office of Graduate Studies.

An undergraduate student enrolled in a graduate course is subject to all University regulations affecting undergraduates.

A student who reserves courses for graduate credit must be admitted to a University graduate program through regular channels before the credit may be applied toward a graduate degree. By allowing the student to earn graduate credit while still an undergraduate, the University makes no guarantee of the student's admissibility to any graduate program.

Courses in the School of Law

Undergraduate students may not take courses in the School of Law.

 


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Undergraduate Catalog
Contents
Chapter 1 - The University
Chapter 2 - School of Architecture
Chapter 3 - Red McCombs School of Business
Chapter 4 - College of Communication
Chapter 5 - College of Education
Chapter 6 - College of Engineering
Chapter 7 - College of Fine Arts
Chapter 8 - School of Information
Chapter 9 - College of Liberal Arts
Chapter 10 - College of Natural Sciences
Chapter 11 - School of Nursing
Chapter 12 - College of Pharmacy
Chapter 13 - School of Social Work
Chapter 14 - The Faculty
Texas Common Course Numbering System (Appendix A)
Appendix B - Degree and Course Abbreviations

Related Information
Catalogs
Course Schedules
Academic Calendars
Office of Admissions


Office of the Registrar
University of Texas at Austin

17 August 2004. Registrar's Web Team

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