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Undergrad 04-06

CONTENTS

CHAPTER 1
The University

CHAPTER 2
School of Architecture

CHAPTER 3
Red McCombs
School of Business

CHAPTER 4
College of Communication

CHAPTER 5
College of Education

CHAPTER 6
College of Engineering

CHAPTER 7
College of Fine Arts

CHAPTER 8
School of Information

CHAPTER 9
College of Liberal Arts

CHAPTER 10
College of
Natural Sciences

CHAPTER 11
School of Nursing

CHAPTER 12
College of Pharmacy

CHAPTER 13
School of Social Work

CHAPTER 14
The Faculty

Texas Common Course Numbering System
(Appendix A)

APPENDIX B
Degree and Course Abbreviations

 

    

2. School of Architecture

 

Frederick R. Steiner
PhD
Dean

Louise Harpman
MArch
Associate Dean

Robert G. Paterson
PhD
Associate Dean
Director, Graduate Program in Community and Regional Planning

Kevin S. Alter
MArch
Associate Dean

Web site
www.ar.utexas.edu

General Information

The School of Architecture is a member of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture and the Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning. The Bachelor of Architecture and Master of Architecture are accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board and satisfy the registration requirements of the Texas Board of Architectural Examiners. The Bachelor of Science in Interior Design satisfies the interior design registration requirements of the Texas Board of Architectural Examiners; it is accredited by the Foundation of Interior Design Education and Research and the National Association of Schools of Art and Design. The Master of Science in Community and Regional Planning is accredited by the American Planning Association.

Purpose

The School of Architecture seeks to assist those who wish to develop knowledge, sensitivity, and skill in design, planning, and construction, so that as architects, interior designers, and planners they may improve the human environment. The curriculum offers opportunities for a broad education in professional subjects and in the arts and the humanities. Through avenues that stress solving actual and theoretical problems, the school seeks to enhance the knowledge and skill necessary to link understanding to experience, theory to practice, and art to science in ways that respond to human needs, aspirations, and sensibilities. Through its consortium of architects, interior designers, and planners, and educators and scholars in these fields, the school provides a service to society and to the architecture, interior design, and planning professions by advancing the state of the art in design and technology.

History

The University began offering professional degrees in architecture in 1910 within the College of Engineering. The School of Architecture was established in 1948 as a division of the College of Engineering and became an autonomous school of the University in September 1951. Graduate study in architecture began at the University in 1912. More than four thousand undergraduate and graduate degrees in architecture and planning have been conferred.

Education in community and regional planning was first offered as an undergraduate study option in the School of Architecture from 1948 to 1957. The Master of Science in Community and Regional Planning was formally approved in October 1959; the Doctor of Philosophy, in April 1995.

Education in interior design was first offered in 1939 within the degree of Bachelor of Science in Home Economics. In 1992 the College of Natural Sciences created the Bachelor of Science in Interior Design degree program; in the fall of 1998 this program was revised and transferred to the School of Architecture. The first interior design degrees were conferred by the school in May 2001.

Facilities for Study and Research

The School of Architecture is centrally located on campus in four adjacent buildings: the historically significant: Battle Hall (1911); Sutton Hall (1918, renovated in 1982), designed by distinguished American architect Cass Gilbert; Goldsmith Hall (1933, expanded and renovated in 1988), designed by noted architect Paul Philippe Cret, one of the primary planners of the forty-acre campus; and the West Mall Office Building (1961).

The Architecture and Planning Library, a branch of the General Libraries, maintains more than 50,000 volumes, including bound periodicals; several thousand professional reports; all major architecture, interior design, and planning journals; and the Alexander Architectural Archive of more than 120,000 drawings and photographs. The Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, one of the world's foremost institutions for literary and cultural research, houses a large collection of rare architecture books, including the classics of architectural literature.

The Architecture Reference Center contains audiovisual equipment, technical and design reference material, and almost 250,000 photographic slides of architectural and related works. The Materials Library and Conservation Workshop provides architecture and interior design students with state-of-the-art laboratories for research and experimentation with materials, lighting, and preservation technology.

The Center for American Architecture and Design, established in the School of Architecture in 1982, provides support and resources for the scholarly study of American architecture, particularly that of the Southwest. Through lectures, exhibitions, seminars, symposia, fellowship support, and the collection of research materials, the center encourages a community of architecture scholarship.

Computer-aided design and research opportunities are provided in the design studios and by the school's computer laboratory, which maintains desktop computers and terminals interfaced with the University's extensive academic computing facilities. The Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies and the Benson Latin American Collection provide exceptional opportunities for the study of Latin American architecture.

Study Abroad

The School of Architecture offers several opportunities to study architecture, interior design, planning, and urban design in settings very different from those familiar to United States residents. Students may participate in these programs after completing the third year of their degree programs. The school offers a broad range of scholarships to help students take advantage of these programs.

Regular summer study abroad programs take place in Oxford and the United Kingdom and at the Santa Chiara Study Center near Florence. Recent programs have also been conducted in Bosnia, Turkey, and Morocco. Fall semester programs allow students to travel to Japan, to Italy, or within Europe; in the spring, students may study in Mexico.

More information on these programs is available in the office of the associate dean for undergraduate programs.

Student Organizations

The Architecture, Interior Design, and Planning Student Council represents the student body. All students are automatically members. The council's elected executive committee includes the school's representative to the American Institute of Architecture Students (AIAS) and the student representatives to the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID), the International Interior Design Association (IIDA), and the American Planning Association (APA).

Tau Sigma Delta is the national honorary society for architecture students. Alpha Rho Chi is the national architecture fraternity, and Alpha Alpha Gamma is the national architecture fraternity for women.

Honors

University Honors

The designation University Honors, awarded at the end of each long-session semester, gives official recognition and commendation to students whose grades for the semester indicate distinguished academic accomplishment. Both the quality and the quantity of work done are considered. Criteria for University Honors are given in chapter 1.

Graduation with University Honors

Students who, upon graduation, have demonstrated outstanding academic achievement are eligible to graduate with University Honors. Criteria for graduation with University Honors are given in chapter 1.

School of Architecture Recognition Awards

Award: Alpha Rho Chi Medal

Donor: Alpha Rho Chi, honorary architectural fraternity

Eligibility: Graduating student who has shown an ability for leadership, has performed willing service to the school, and gives promise of professional merit through attitude and personality

Award: American Institute of Architects' Medal

Donor: American Institute of Architects

Eligibility: Graduating student, in recognition of scholastic achievement, character, and promise of professional ability

Award: Architecture books

Donor: Robert Leon White Memorial Fund, established by Mrs. Robert Leon White

Eligibility: Outstanding graduating students selected by the faculty

Financial Assistance Available through the School of Architecture

Scholarship funds established by individuals, foundations, and the University are available to current undergraduates in the School of Architecture. These include the Blake Alexander Traveling Student Fellowship in Architecture; the Marvin E. and Anne Price Beck Endowed Scholarship; the Carl O. Berquist Endowed Scholarship; the Hal Box Scholarship Fund; the Max Brooks Memorial Scholarship; the John Buck Company and First Chicago Investment Advisors for Fund F Endowed Scholarship in Architecture; the John S. Chase Endowed Presidential Scholarship; the Fred Winfield Day Jr. Endowed Scholarship in Architecture; the Natalie deBlois Scholarship; the Jorge Luis Divino Centennial Scholarship in Architecture; the William H. Emis III Traveling Scholarship in Architecture; the Ted Freedman Endowed Scholarship; the Lily Rush Walker and Coulter Hoppess Scholarship in Architecture; the Jean Houlihan Scholarship; the Wolf E. Jessen Endowed Fund; the Lake/Flato Endowed Scholarship; the Jamie Lofgren Scholarship; the Mike and Maxine Mebane Endowed Traveling Scholarship in Architecture; the Jack H. Morgan Scholarship; the Lorine White Nagel, PBK, and Chester Emil Nagel, FAIA, Scholarship in Excellence in Architectural Design; the Joseph O. Newberry III Memorial Scholarship; the Oglesby Prize Endowment; the Page Southerland Page Fellowship in Architecture; the Alma Piner Scholarship in Architecture; the Brandon Shaw Memorial Endowed Scholarship; the Debbie Ann Rock Scholarship in Interior Design; the School of Architecture Scholarship and Fellowship Awards; the Louis F. Southerland Endowed Scholarship; the E. L. Swanson Scholarship; the J. M. West Texas Corporation Fellowship in Architecture; the Robert Leon White Memorial Fund-Architecture; the Roxanne Williamson Endowed Scholarship; and several scholarships provided by the American Institute of Architects, the American Architectural Foundation, the Texas Society of Architects, the Texas American Planning Association, and the Texas Architectural Foundation. Additional information is available in the Office of the Dean.

Incoming students may wish to contact local chapters of the American Institute of Architects, the American Society of Interior Designers, the International Interior Design Association, and the University's Texas Exes, as well as other civic organizations, for information about locally sponsored scholarships. Students are also encouraged to contact the University of Texas Office of Student Financial Services for information about other merit- and need-based scholarships.

Admission and Registration

Admission

Admission and readmission of all students to the University is the responsibility of the director of admissions. Information about admission to the University is given in General Information.

Undergraduate admission to the School of Architecture is limited to the number of students to whom a professional education of high quality in a design studio atmosphere can be provided. Because of enrollment restrictions dictated by the availability of faculty members and facilities in the School of Architecture and limitations on nonresident enrollment imposed by the Board of Regents, some applicants may be denied admission even though they meet the general requirements of the University. Students who are not admitted to the School of Architecture may not pursue any degree offered by the school. Applicants to the School of Architecture should request an information packet from the School of Architecture, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin TX 78712-1160. Information is also available at http://www.ar.utexas.edu/.

Freshman Admission

Texas-resident high school students have priority over nonresidents in admission decisions. All applicants are considered on the basis of their SAT I or American College Testing Program score, their high school class rank, and the information provided on the admission application. All applicants must fulfill the high school unit requirements given in General Information. Texas-resident high school students in the lower half of their graduating class are not eligible for freshman admission to the School of Architecture; nonresidents in the lower three-quarters of their graduating class are not eligible for freshman admission to the School of Architecture or to the University.

To be considered for admission to the School of Architecture, applicants should enter 909200 (architecture), 908000 (architecture/interior design), 909201 (architecture/architectural engineering dual degree), 909300 (architecture/Plan II), or 908400 (architectural studies) as their major code on the application. All application materials must be submitted to the Office of Admissions by the deadline to apply for admission to the University for the fall semester; this date is given in General Information. Applicants to the dual degree program offered with the Plan II Honors Program must submit an additional application and must meet an earlier deadline; more information about Plan II is given in chapter 9.

Students in Other Colleges of the University

Students currently or formerly enrolled in other University degree programs who wish to enroll in a degree program in the School of Architecture must submit a Change-of-Major Application to the associate dean for undergraduate programs, School of Architecture, by March 1 to be considered for admission for the following fall semester. To be considered for change-of-major admission, the student must have completed at least twenty-four semester hours of University coursework and should have a University grade point average of at least 3.25. Frequently, a higher grade point average is required for admission, because the number of applicants exceeds the number of spaces available. Admission decisions are made after the end of the spring semester.

Transfer Admission

Students applying to transfer from other universities to the School of Architecture should use 909200 (architecture), 908000 (architecture/interior design), 909201 (architecture/architectural engineering dual degree), 909300 (architecture/Plan II), or 908400 (architectural studies) as their intended major code. All application materials must be submitted to the Office of Admissions by the deadline to apply for admission to the University for the fall semester; this date is given in General Information. To be considered for transfer admission to the School of Architecture, the applicant must have completed at least twenty-four semester hours of transferable college coursework. All admission decisions are made before the end of the spring semester; the Office of Admissions cannot consider spring coursework in progress.

Transfer admission to the School of Architecture is quite competitive. Applicants are strongly encouraged to indicate a second choice of major so that, if they are not admitted to the School of Architecture as transfer students, they will be eligible for change-of-major admission the following fall. Additional information is given in the section "Students in Other Colleges of the University," above.

Summer Entry

The School of Architecture considers students for admission once a year, for the following fall semester. A student who is admitted for the fall semester may ask to enter in the preceding summer session instead, but the number of students who may enter in the summer is limited. Students seeking summer entry must obtain permission from the office of the associate dean for undergraduate programs. An admitted student who is unable to attend in either the summer session or the fall semester must reapply for admission to enroll at a later time. A student may not enter the School of Architecture in the spring semester.

Transfer Credit

Transfer students with design studio credit from another school must submit samples of their design work to the associate dean for undergraduate programs before they may register for a design studio. On the basis of this work, the associate dean determines the level at which the student enters the design sequence and assigns credit toward the degree if appropriate. Transfer students must also meet all requirements prescribed for the degree, including those described in the sections "Registration for Advanced Design Courses" and "Third-Year Portfolio Requirement" below. Additional information is available from the School of Architecture.

Duration of Programs

Bachelor of Architecture. This degree program is structured around a core of nine semesters of design coursework and normally requires five years of study. The dual degree program with architectural engineering normally requires six years; the dual degree program with the Plan II Honors Program normally requires five years, including three summer sessions. Only one studio may be taken at a time, and few are offered in the summer. In general, architectural design studios are open only to students accepted into an architecture degree program. To complete the Bachelor of Architecture degree, students without transfer credit in architectural design should plan to be in residence ten semesters from the time they are admitted and enrolled in Architecture 310K.

Bachelor of Science in Architectural Studies. This degree program normally requires four years of study. Since the program includes six semesters of architectural design coursework, students without transfer credit in architectural design should plan to spend at least six semesters in residence.

Bachelor of Science in Interior Design. This degree program normally requires four years of study. Since the program includes eight semesters of design coursework, students without transfer credit in interior design should plan to spend at least eight semesters in residence.

Registration

General Information gives information about registration, adding and dropping courses, transfer from one division of the University to another, and auditing a course. The Course Schedule, published before registration each semester and summer session, includes registration instructions, advising locations, and the times, places, and instructors of classes. The Course Schedule and General Information are sold at campus-area bookstores. They are also published on the World Wide Web and are accessible through the registrar's Web site.

Students should carefully verify that they have completed all course prerequisites, should consult the staff of the associate dean for undergraduate programs before registering, and should be sure to include in the semester's work the courses that are prerequisites for those to be taken in later semesters.

Minimum Number of Hours in the Long Session

Students must register each semester for at least twelve semester hours of coursework prescribed for the degree. Registration for fewer hours must be approved by the office of the associate dean for undergraduate programs.

Registration for Advanced Design Courses

To register for advanced design courses, a student seeking the Bachelor of Architecture degree must have completed all of the work prescribed for the preceding years, with the exception of electives, and must satisfy the third-year portfolio requirement. The student must have a University grade point average of at least 2.50 and must meet the prerequisite for each course.

Third-Year Portfolio Requirement

All students, whether continuing in or transferring to the School of Architecture, must obtain written authorization from the office of the associate dean for undergraduate programs to enter advanced design courses. Authorization is gained by submitting to the faculty a satisfactory portfolio. This portfolio should summarize the student's work completed in design and visual communication courses. Supplementary material that will provide useful information to the reviewing committee in evaluating the student's progress toward the degree may also be included. The portfolio is submitted by continuing architecture students at the beginning of the second semester of the third year, by interior design students at the end of the second semester of the third year, and by transfer students before they register for any design studio beyond Architecture 310K. Guidelines for submission of the portfolio, including the submission deadline, are available from the office of the associate dean for undergraduate programs.

The reviewing committee, at its discretion, may require a student to take additional coursework before being permitted to register for advanced design courses or may require the student to undertake specific courses in the remaining years.

Advising

In the School of Architecture, the office of the associate dean for undergraduate programs, located in Goldsmith Hall 2.116, is responsible for providing information and advice to undergraduate students. An important aspect of the advising system is the third-year portfolio requirement described above. The student should also consult the sections "Sequence of Work" and "The Degree Audit" in this chapter.

 


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Undergraduate Catalog
Contents
Chapter 1 - The University
Chapter 2 - School of Architecture
Chapter 3 - Red McCombs School of Business
Chapter 4 - College of Communication
Chapter 5 - College of Education
Chapter 6 - College of Engineering
Chapter 7 - College of Fine Arts
Chapter 8 - School of Information
Chapter 9 - College of Liberal Arts
Chapter 10 - College of Natural Sciences
Chapter 11 - School of Nursing
Chapter 12 - College of Pharmacy
Chapter 13 - School of Social Work
Chapter 14 - The Faculty
Texas Common Course Numbering System (Appendix A)
Appendix B - Degree and Course Abbreviations

Related Information
Catalogs
Course Schedules
Academic Calendars
Office of Admissions


Office of the Registrar
University of Texas at Austin

17 August 2004. Registrar's Web Team

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