skip to content
UT Austin
photo
Undergrad 04-06

CONTENTS

CHAPTER 1
The University

CHAPTER 2
School of Architecture

CHAPTER 3
Red McCombs
School of Business

CHAPTER 4
College of Communication

CHAPTER 5
College of Education

CHAPTER 6
College of Engineering

CHAPTER 7
College of Fine Arts

CHAPTER 8
School of Information

CHAPTER 9
College of Liberal Arts

CHAPTER 10
College of
Natural Sciences

CHAPTER 11
School of Nursing

CHAPTER 12
College of Pharmacy

CHAPTER 13
School of Social Work

CHAPTER 14
The Faculty

Texas Common Course Numbering System
(Appendix A)

APPENDIX B
Degree and Course Abbreviations

 

    

6. College of Engineering

Courses

--continued

 

The faculty has approval to offer the following courses in the academic years 2004-2005 and 2005-2006; however, not all courses are taught each semester or summer session. Students should consult the Course Schedule to determine which courses and topics will be offered during a particular semester or summer session. The Course Schedule may also reflect changes made to the course inventory after the publication of this catalog.

A full explanation of course numbers is given in General Information. In brief, the first digit of a course number indicates the semester hour value of the course. The second and third digits indicate the rank of the course: if they are 01 through 19, the course is of lower-division rank; if 20 through 79, of upper-division rank; if 80 through 99, of graduate rank.

Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering

Unless otherwise stated below, each course meets for three lecture hours a week for one semester.

Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering: PGE

Lower-Division Courses

102. Introduction to Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering.
Enrollment limited to beginning students in petroleum and geosystems engineering. Familiarizes the new student with the opportunities and responsibilities to be found in a career in petroleum and geosystems engineering. One lecture hour a week for one semester.

305. Energy and the Environment.
The forms of current and potential energy sources, and how these might impact the earth's environment. Three lecture hours and one and one-half laboratory hours a week for one semester. May not be counted toward a degree in geological sciences, geosystems engineering and hydrology, or petroleum engineering.

310. Formulation and Solution of Geosystems Engineering Problems.
Application of engineering methods to problem solving; computer programming; formulation of physical concepts into mathematical equations; approximations and rules of thumb; graphical, analytical, and numerical methods. Prerequisite: Physics 303K and 103M and credit or registration for Mathematics 427K.

312. Physical and Chemical Behavior of Fluids I.
Principles of organic chemistry; phase behavior; properties of hydrocarbon gases and liquids and oil field waters; overview of laboratory phase behavior measurements; material balance calculations. Prerequisite: Chemistry 302 and credit or registration for Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 310.

Upper-Division Courses

421K. Physical and Chemical Behavior of Fluids II.
Applications of thermodynamics and physical chemistry to petroleum and geosystems engineering. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 326, and admission to an appropriate major sequence in engineering or consent of instructor.

322K. Transport Phenomena in Geosystems.
Applications of mass, heat, and momentum balances to fluid flow problems; shell balances; non-Newtonian fluids; transport processes through permeable media. Prerequisite: Mathematics 427K, and admission to an appropriate major sequence in engineering or consent of instructor.

323. Fluid Flow through Permeable Media.
Properties of fluid-saturated rocks; steady-state and transient fluid flow in permeable reservoir rocks as applied to subsurface engineering problems. Prerequisite: For petroleum engineering majors and geosystems engineering and hydrogeology majors, Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 322K and 424, Mathematics 427K, and admission to the major sequence; for others, consent of instructor.

424. Petrophysics.
Properties of rocks; measurement and interpretation of petrophysical properties; application of petrophysics to subsurface engineering problems; interaction of resident fluids with rocks. Extensive written reporting. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: For petroleum engineering majors and geosystems engineering and hydrogeology majors, Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 333T, credit or registration for Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 322K, and admission to the major sequence; for others, consent of instructor.

325L. Cooperative Engineering.
This course covers the work period of petroleum engineering students in the Cooperative Engineering Program. Forty laboratory hours a week for three semesters. The student must complete Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 325LX, 325LY, and 325LZ before a grade and degree credit are awarded. Prerequisite: For 325LX, application to become a member of the Cooperative Engineering Program, approval of the dean, and appointment for a full-time cooperative work tour; for 325LY, Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 325LX and appointment for a full-time cooperative work tour; for 325LZ, Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 325LY and appointment for a full-time cooperative work tour.

225M. Cooperative Engineering.
This course covers the work period of petroleum engineering students in the Cooperative Engineering Program. Forty laboratory hours a week for two semesters. The student must complete Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 225MA and 225MB before a grade and degree credit are awarded. Prerequisite: For 225MA, application to become a member of the Cooperative Engineering Program, approval of the dean, and appointment for a full-time cooperative work tour; for 225MB, Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 225MA and appointment for a full-time cooperative work tour.

326. Thermodynamics and Phase Behavior.
Application of classical thermodynamics to the behavior of fluids, with emphasis on phase behavior of multicomponent mixtures. Prerequisite: For petroleum engineering majors and geosystems engineering and hydrogeology majors, Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 312, Mathematics 427K, and admission to the major sequence; for others, consent of instructor.

430. Drilling and Well Completions.
Elements of rock mechanics, drilling fluids, factors affecting rate of penetration, and well completions, including casing and tubing design. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: For petroleum engineering majors, credit or registration for Engineering Mechanics 311, 319, and Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 322K, and admission to the major sequence; for others, consent of instructor.

331. Fundamentals of Reservoir Engineering.
Classification of subsurface reservoirs by type and recovery mechanism; reserve estimates based on volumetric, material balance and decline curve techniques; transient fluid flow theory applied to predicting production rates; introduction to displacement processes. Prerequisite: For petroleum engineering majors and geosystems engineering and hydrogeology majors, Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 312 and 323, credit or registration for Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 424, and admission to the major sequence; for others, consent of instructor.

432. Geometry and Mechanics of Geologic Structures.
Description, classification, and mechanical analysis of geologic structures such as faults, folds, and fractures. Deformation mechanisms in rock, in situ stress, seismic interpretation, geologic mapping, and rock fracture. Emphasis on applications to engineering. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Engineering Mechanics 319 and Geological Sciences 416M.

333T. Engineering Communication.
Advanced technical communication skills, with emphasis on writing strategies for technical documents, oral presentations, and visual aids. Prerequisite: Rhetoric and Composition 306 (or English 306).

337. Introduction to Geostatistics.
Basic probability and statistics, study of correlated variables, statistical interpolation and simulation, and global optimization. Emphasis is on the ways the results of these procedures are related to geology and fluid flow. Prerequisite: Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 310, and Mathematics 408D or the equivalent.

361. Advanced Reservoir Engineering.
Secondary recovery methods; computer simulation of reservoir performance; applications to field problems. Prerequisite: Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 326 and 331.

362. Production Technology and Design.
Analysis, specification, and characteristics of production systems; inflow performance; wellbore and tubing hydraulics; and artificial lift. Prerequisite: For petroleum engineering majors, credit or registration for Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 430 and admission to the major sequence; for others, consent of instructor.

363. Petroleum Leasing Regulations and Practices.
Domestic and worldwide regulations associated with petroleum leasing, including offshore areas, and environmental provisions concerning petroleum exploration and production. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 365 or the equivalent, and upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

364. Natural Gas Engineering.
Production, transportation, and storage of gas; metering and gauging; performance of wells; estimation of gas reserves; prevention of waste and utilization of natural gas. Prerequisite: For petroleum engineering majors, Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 326, 331, and 362 and admission to the major sequence; for others, upper-division standing and consent of instructor.

365. Resource Economics and Valuation.
Derivation of profitability criteria for earth resource investments, project analysis in terms of the interrelation of technical and economic factors, investment analysis in the presence of uncertainty, and project planning. Prerequisite: Admission to an appropriate major sequence in engineering or consent of instructor.

368. Fundamentals of Well Logging.
Principles, applications, and interpretation of well logs as used in exploration and evaluation of subsurface formations. Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 416M and Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 424, and admission to an appropriate major sequence in engineering or consent of instructor.

369. Quantitative Well-Log Analysis.
Problem-oriented applications of well-log combinations for petroleum exploration, evaluation, and production planning. Prerequisite: Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 368, and admission to an appropriate major sequence in engineering or consent of instructor.

370. Fundamentals of Subsurface Environmental Engineering.
Development of equations for simultaneous flow of three fluids (air, water, and one other phase), characterization of contaminated sites, physical and chemical processes, overview of remediation technologies. Applications to the unsaturated and saturated zones, and contamination of groundwater by nonaqueous phase liquids. Prerequisite: Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 323, Civil Engineering 374L, or Geological Sciences 476K; and admission to an appropriate major sequence in engineering.

371. Energy Finance.
Fundamentals of finance as applied to the petroleum industry, including petroleum project financing techniques, investigating sources of capital, and methods used to evaluate an oil company's financial performance. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 365 or the equivalent, and admission to an appropriate major sequence in engineering or consent of instructor.

373K. Geosystems Engineering Design and Analysis I.
Analysis and design of subsurface injection and extraction systems, project organization, fundamentals of operations research, oral and written reporting, graphical presentations and use of visual aids, use of computer-aided engineering, and impact of ethical and economic issues on design. Prerequisite: Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 323 or the equivalent, Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 333T and 365, and admission to an appropriate major sequence in engineering or consent of instructor.

373L. Geosystems Engineering Design and Analysis II.
Team-oriented design projects involving the application of geologic and engineering methods to the solution of subsurface problems, using field case histories. Projects are selected for each student based on his or her petroleum engineering technical area option. Prerequisite: For petroleum engineering majors, Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 331, 362, 368, and 373K; for others, upper-division standing and consent of instructor.

176, 276, 376. Special Problems in Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering.
Independent investigation of an advanced subject in petroleum and geosystems engineering, for superior students only. Conference course. Prerequisite: Admission to an appropriate major sequence in engineering and written consent of instructor.

379. Studies in Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering.
Special courses or seminars on recent developments in engineering. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Admission to an appropriate major sequence in engineering or consent of instructor.

679H. Undergraduate Honors Thesis.
Research performed during two consecutive semesters under the supervision of an engineering faculty member; topics are selected jointly by the student and the faculty member with approval by the director of the Engineering Honors Program. The student makes an oral presentation and writes a thesis. Individual instruction for two semesters. Students pursuing both the Bachelor of Arts, Plan II, and a bachelor's degree in engineering may use this course to fulfill the thesis requirement for the Bachelor of Arts, Plan II. Prerequisite: For 679HA, enrollment in the Engineering Honors Program; for 679HB, Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 679HA and enrollment in the Engineering Honors Program.

 


Top of File     

Previous File in Chapter 6

      

 

Undergraduate Catalog
Contents
Chapter 1 - The University
Chapter 2 - School of Architecture
Chapter 3 - Red McCombs School of Business
Chapter 4 - College of Communication
Chapter 5 - College of Education
Chapter 6 - College of Engineering
Chapter 7 - College of Fine Arts
Chapter 8 - School of Information
Chapter 9 - College of Liberal Arts
Chapter 10 - College of Natural Sciences
Chapter 11 - School of Nursing
Chapter 12 - College of Pharmacy
Chapter 13 - School of Social Work
Chapter 14 - The Faculty
Texas Common Course Numbering System (Appendix A)
Appendix B - Degree and Course Abbreviations

Related Information
Catalogs
Course Schedules
Academic Calendars
Office of Admissions


Office of the Registrar
University of Texas at Austin

17 August 2004. Registrar's Web Team

Send comments to Official Publications