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Undergrad 04-06

CONTENTS

CHAPTER 1
The University

CHAPTER 2
School of Architecture

CHAPTER 3
Red McCombs
School of Business

CHAPTER 4
College of Communication

CHAPTER 5
College of Education

CHAPTER 6
College of Engineering

CHAPTER 7
College of Fine Arts

CHAPTER 8
School of Information

CHAPTER 9
College of Liberal Arts

CHAPTER 10
College of
Natural Sciences

CHAPTER 11
School of Nursing

CHAPTER 12
College of Pharmacy

CHAPTER 13
School of Social Work

CHAPTER 14
The Faculty

Texas Common Course Numbering System
(Appendix A)

APPENDIX B
Degree and Course Abbreviations

 

    

9. College of Liberal Arts

--continued

 

Courses

The faculty has approval to offer the following courses in the academic years 2004-2005 and 2005-2006; however, not all courses are taught each semester or summer session. Students should consult the Course Schedule to determine which courses and topics will be offered during a particular semester or summer session. The Course Schedule may also reflect changes made to the course inventory after the publication of this catalog.

A full explanation of course numbers is given in General Information. In brief, the first digit of a course number indicates the semester hour value of the course. The second and third digits indicate the rank of the course: if they are 01 through 19, the course is of lower-division rank; if 20 through 79, of upper-division rank; if 80 through 99, of graduate rank.

Liberal Arts

Unless otherwise stated below, each course meets for three lecture hours a week for one semester.

Liberal Arts: L A

Lower-Division Course

001. Freshman Interest Group Seminar.
Restricted to students in the Freshman Interest Group Program. Basic issues in various liberal arts disciplines. One lecture hour a week for one semester.

301D. Connecting Research Experience.
Restricted to freshmen and sophomores. Supervised research associated with the Connexus Bridging Disciplines Program. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. With consent of the Connexus Bridging Disciplines Program, may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Admission to the Connexus Bridging Disciplines Program.

302. Texas Interdisciplinary Plan: Critical Thinking Seminar.
Restricted to students in the Texas Interdisciplinary Plan or in the Gateway Program. An examination of fundamental concepts in critical thinking, including the role of intellectual virtues, an analysis of the elements of thought, Socratic thinking, and the application of universal intellectual standards. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, with additional hours to be arranged. Liberal Arts 302 and Natural Sciences 302 may not both be counted. May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Division Courses

320C. Connecting Research Experience.
Supervised research associated with the Connexus Bridging Disciplines Program. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. With consent of the Connexus Bridging Disciplines Program, may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and admission to the Connexus Bridging Disciplines Program.

125, 225, 325. Topics in the Liberal Arts.
Analysis of topics in the philosophy and real-life application of the liberal arts. For each semester hour of credit earned, the equivalent of one lecture hour a week for one semester. Additional meeting times may be required. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing. Additional prerequisites vary with the topic and are given in the Course Schedule.

371. Texas Interdisciplinary Plan Seminar.
Restricted to students in the Texas Interdisciplinary Plan. An analysis of interdisciplinary themes within the arts and sciences through reading, research, discussion, and writing. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, with additional hours to be arranged. Liberal Arts 371 and Natural Sciences 371 may not both be counted. May not be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and consent of the Texas Interdisciplinary Plan adviser.

Liberal Arts Honors

Unless otherwise stated below, each course meets for three lecture hours a week for one semester.

Liberal Arts Honors: LAH

Lower-Division Courses

102H. The Idea of the Liberal Arts.
By invitation only. Enrichment course for honors and prospective honors students. An overview of the liberal arts disciplines, including formation of the discipline, majoring in the discipline, research and career opportunities. One and one-half class hours a week for one semester. Enrollment limited to freshmen in the Plan I Honors Program in the College of Liberal Arts.

305. Introduction to the Liberal Arts.
Intensive small class lecture or seminar course addressing basic issues in various liberal arts disciplines. Lectures, readings, discussions, examinations. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: A Plan I major in the College of Liberal Arts and admission to the Liberal Arts Honors Program, or consent of instructor.

112H. The Nature of Inquiry.
Designed for students who plan to enter a liberal arts departmental honors program. Introduction to the nature of research in liberal arts disciplines. One and one-half class hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Twenty-four semester hours of coursework and consent of the liberal arts honors adviser.

Upper-Division Courses

350. Topics in the Liberal Arts.
Intensive lecture course treating topics from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, taught by instructors from various departments. Lectures, readings, discussions, examinations. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; a Plan I major in the College of Liberal Arts and admission to the Liberal Arts Honors Program, or consent of instructor.

364H. The Enlightenment.
Examination of the European Enlightenment, an intellectual movement centered in eighteenth-century France and England that cut across all disciplines and arts and that looked back to the Renaissance and forward to the modern world. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; and a Plan I major in the College of Liberal Arts and admission to the Liberal Arts Honors Program, or consent of instructor.

365H. Great Books in Political Philosophy.
An investigation of what it means to think "philosophically" about politics and morals, by reading and interpreting primary sources of political philosophy from more than twenty centuries. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; and a Plan I major in the College of Liberal Arts and admission to the Liberal Arts Honors Program, or consent of instructor.

367H. Amity and Polity in Don Quijote and Moby Dick.
A close reading of two novels that portray a contrast between fellowship and contention, between familiarity and impersonality. Emphasis is on explication of the works' historical, cultural, and political backgrounds. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; and a Plan I major in the College of Liberal Arts and admission to the Liberal Arts Honors Program, or consent of instructor.

368H. Literature of the Hispanic World.
An examination of the literature and culture of Spain and Spanish America, from the Middle Ages to the present. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; and a Plan I major in the College of Liberal Arts and admission to the Liberal Arts Honors Program, or consent of instructor.

369H. Comparative Legal Systems.
A comparison of legal traditions from Europe, English common law, and Asia. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; and a Plan I major in the College of Liberal Arts and admission to the Liberal Arts Honors Program, or consent of instructor.

370H. The Birth of the Modern World, 1400-1700.
An interdisciplinary course on European culture during the age of the Renaissance and Reformation. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; and a Plan I major in the College of Liberal Arts and admission to the Liberal Arts Honors Program, or consent of instructor.

371H. Classics of Greek Philosophy.
A close reading of major works in the philosophy of Plato and Aristotle, supported by background reading in the history and literature of ancient Greece. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; and a Plan I major in the College of Liberal Arts and admission to the Liberal Arts Honors Program, or consent of instructor.

373H. Literature of the Western World: Continuities.
Tradition and innovation of form and thought in literature from Homer to the twentieth century. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; and a Plan I major in the College of Liberal Arts and admission to the Liberal Arts Honors Program, or consent of instructor.

376H. The Rise of Modern America.
The end of Reconstruction (1877) to the end of the war in Vietnam (1975)industrialization, urbanization, immigration, nuclear energy, and global reach. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; and a Plan I major in the College of Liberal Arts and admission to the Liberal Arts Honors Program, or consent of instructor.

377H. Ideas of the Twentieth Century.
Central philosophical controversies of the twentieth century: ethics, politics, comparative religions, science and human nature. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; and a Plan I major in the College of Liberal Arts and admission to the Liberal Arts Honors Program, or consent of instructor.

378H. The Natural Sciences in the Liberal Arts Context.
An attempt to understand contemporary developments in science by focusing on the history and philosophy of science. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; and a Plan I major in the College of Liberal Arts and admission to the Liberal Arts Honors Program, or consent of instructor.

379H. Classical Asian Civilizations.
An examination of the contributions of India and China to intellectual history. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; and a Plan I major in the College of Liberal Arts and admission to the Liberal Arts Honors Program, or consent of instructor.

679T. Honors Thesis.
Supervised research, reading, and writing of a substantial paper on an interdepartmental subject. Conference course for two semesters. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: For Liberal Arts Honors 679TA, upper-division standing, a Plan I major in the College of Liberal Arts, admission to the Liberal Arts Honors Program, and written consent of the director of the Liberal Arts Honors Program; for 679TB, Liberal Arts Honors 679TA.

Department of American Studies

Unless otherwise stated below, each course meets for three lecture hours a week for one semester.

American Studies: AMS

Lower-Division Courses

310. Introduction to American Studies.
Same as History 306N (Topic 2: Introduction to American Studies). An interdisciplinary introduction to contemporary American culture. Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

315. Topics in American Life.
Painting, music, drama, and writing studied in terms of their common creative background and interdisciplinary relationships. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

119S, 219S, 319S, 419S, 519S, 619S, 719S, 819S, 919S. Topics in American Studies.
This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Center for Global Educational Opportunities. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of American Studies. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Upper-Division Courses

321. Studies in American Societies.
A study of America through its geography, language, government, or cultures. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Some topics partially fulfill legislative requirement for American history; these are identified in the Course Schedule. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: Indians of the American Southwest. Same as Anthropology 322M (Topic 3: Indians of the American Southwest). Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

Topic 2: Language and Speech in American Society. Same as Anthropology 325N, Linguistics 373 (Topic 2: Language and Speech in American Society), and Sociology 352M (Topic 3: Language and Speech in American Society). Prerequisite: Anthropology 302, 305, 307, or Linguistics 306; or consent of instructor.

Topic 3: American Indian Cultures North of Mexico. Same as Anthropology 336L. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, and Anthropology 302 or consent of instructor.

321C. The Brazilian Left, 1900 to the Present.
Same as Latin American Studies 322 (Topic 5: The Brazilian Left, 1900 to the Present). Only one of the following may be counted: American Studies 321 (Topic: Brazilian Left, 1900 to Present), 321 (Topic: Comparative Cultural Studies: Brazil), 321C, Latin American Studies 322 (Topic: Brazilian Left, 1900 to 1992). Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

321D. Recent Brazil, 1919 to the Present.
Same as Latin American Studies 322 (Topic 6: Recent Brazil, 1919 to the Present). American Studies 321 (Topic: Recent Brazil, 1919 to the Present) and 321D may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and consent of instructor.

322. Studies in American Writing.
A study of America through its literature, popular fiction, journalism, and folklore. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Some topics partially fulfill legislative requirement for American history; these are identified in the Course Schedule. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 2: Psychological Themes in Modern American Drama. Same as English 376L (Topic 3: Psychological Themes in Modern American Drama). Prerequisite: Rhetoric and Composition 306 and English 316K or their equivalents, and three additional semester hours of lower-division coursework in either English or rhetoric and composition.

Topic 3: Sport, Fitness, and Mass Media. Same as Kinesiology 352K (Topic 5: Sport, Fitness, and Mass Media).

323. Women's and Gender Studies: Humanities.
Same as English 370W (Topic 1: Women's and Gender Studies: Humanities) and Women's and Gender Studies 321 (Topic 1: Women's and Gender Studies: Humanities). An analysis of the role and image of the woman in America. Prerequisite: Rhetoric and Composition 306 and English 316K or their equivalents, and three additional semester hours of lower-division coursework in either English or rhetoric and composition.

325. Studies in American Art.
An analysis of the social and aesthetic context of the arts in America. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: American Art: Colonial Era to the Civil War.

Topic 2: American Painting to 1860. Same as Art History 374 (Topic 1: American Painting to 1860). Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, Art History 302 and 303, and a major in art history; or consent of instructor.

Topic 3: American Painting, 1860-1913. Same as Art History 374 (Topic 2: American Painting, 1860-1913). Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, Art History 302 and 303, and a major in art history; or consent of instructor.

327. Studies in Religion and Philosophy.
The role of religious thought and philosophy in America. Three lecture hours or two lecture hours and one laboratory/discussion hour a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: Major Works on Religion and Interpretation. Same as Philosophy 356 (Topic 1: Major Works on Religion and Interpretation) and Religious Studies 356. Three lecture hours or two lecture hours and one laboratory/discussion hour a week for one semester. American Studies 327 (Topic 1) and History 366N (Topic 2: Major Works on Religion and Interpretation) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

Topic 2: American Philosophy: Puritans through Transcendentalists. Same as Philosophy 351. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: American Studies 327 (Topic 2), Religious Studies 346 (Topic 1: American Philosophy: Puritans through Transcendentalists), 361 (Topic 1: American Philosophy: Puritans through Transcendentalists). Prerequisite: Upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

Topic 3: American Philosophy: The Pragmatist Movement. Same as Philosophy 352. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

328. American Culture and Social Life since 1945.
Same as History 356N. Study of postwar American culture and society, using novels, plays, movies, music, television, journalism, political thought, and social criticism; special attention to the 1950s. American Studies 322 (Topic: American Culture and Social Life since 1945) and 328 may not both be counted. Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

329. Environmental History of North America.
Same as History 350L (Topic 4: Environmental History of North America) and Urban Studies 353 (Topic 5: Environmental History of North America). The history of humanity's influence on the plants, animals, microlife, soils, water, and air of North America, and vice versa, from the arrival of the proto-Indians to the contemporary environmental crisis. Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

129S, 229S, 329S, 429S, 529S, 629S, 729S, 829S, 929S. Topics in American Studies.
This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Center for Global Educational Opportunities. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of American Studies. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

330. Modernism in American Design and Architecture.
Same as Art History 367 (Topic 3: Modernism in American Design and Architecture). A historical survey of artifacts, buildings, and urban environments, focusing on responses to machine-age civilization. American Studies 325 (Topic: Modernism in American Design and Architecture) and 330 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: For art history majors, Art History 302; for visual art studies majors, Art History 302 and 303; for others, at least one of the following is advisable but not required: Art History 301, 302, 303.

331. Art, Photography, and Culture of the American West to 1880.
Same as Art History 367 (Topic 1: Art, Photography, and Culture of the American West to 1880) and History 366R. The image and history of the West as seen through the eyes of early explorers, artists, and scientists. Only one of the following may be counted: American Studies 331, Museum Course 322 (Topic: Art, Photography, and Culture of the American West to 1880), 331. Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history. Prerequisite: For art history majors, Art History 302; for visual art studies majors, Art History 302 and 303; for others, at least one of the following is advisable but not required: Art History 301, 302, 303.

332. Art, Photography, and Culture of the American West since 1880.
Same as Art History 367 (Topic 2: Art, Photography, and Culture of the American West since 1880) and History 366S. Only one of the following may be counted: American Studies 332, Museum Course 322 (Topic: Art, Photography, Film, and Culture of the American West), 332. Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history. Prerequisite: For art history majors, Art History 302; for visual art studies majors, Art History 302 and 303; for others, at least one of the following is advisable but not required: Art History 301, 302, 303.

355. Main Currents of American Culture to 1865.
Same as History 355N. An interdisciplinary course concerned with the definition of American culture in historical perspective. Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

356. Main Currents of American Culture since 1865.
Same as History 356K. An interdisciplinary course concerned with the definition of American culture in historical perspective. Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

357. Medical Geography.
Same as Geography 357. The geographic distribution, expansion, and contraction of the infectious diseases that have the greatest influence in shaping human societies today: malaria, AIDS, and others. American Studies 321 (Topic: Medical Geography) and 357 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

358. The United States, 1920-1941.
Same as History 355M. A history of political, economic, diplomatic, military, social, and cultural developments in the United States between the two world wars. American Studies 322 (Topic: The United States, 1920-1941) and 358 may not both be counted. Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

370. Seminar in American Culture.
Interdisciplinary seminar on themes in American life. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Some topics partially fulfill legislative requirement for American history; these are identified in the Course Schedule. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: American Cultural History of Alcohol and Drugs. Same as History 350L (Topic 2: American Cultural History of Alcohol and Drugs). Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

Topic 6: Gender-Based Discrimination. Same as Government 357M (Topic 1: Gender-Based Discrimination) and Women's and Gender Studies 345 (Topic 8: Gender-Based Discrimination). Prerequisite: Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

Topic 9: Journalist as Novelist. Same as English 379M (Topic 1: Journalist as Novelist), and Journalism 349T (Topic 3: Journalist as Novelist). American Studies 370 (Topic 9) and Journalism 352 (Topic 4: Journalist as Novelist) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, Rhetoric and Composition 306 and English 316K or their equivalents, and three additional semester hours of lower-division coursework in either English or rhetoric and composition.

Topic 10: Leadership in America. Same as Government 370L (Topic 2: Leadership in America). Prerequisite: Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

Topic 11: Painting as History.

Topic 12: American Landscape Art. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

Topic 13: The Culture of Cities. Same as Urban Studies 354 (Topic 4: The Culture of Cities).

Topic 14: The Geography of Tourism.

Topic 15: Constructing the American Landscape.

Topic 16: America, France, and the Problem of Race. Same as African and African American Studies 374E (Topic 1: America, France, and the Problem of Race). How France and the United States address the contradictions between freedom and slavery, as well as each country's contributions to the development of ideologies of race.

372. Conference Course.
Supervised individual study of selected subjects in American studies. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and consent of instructor.

679H. Honors Tutorial Course.
Individual readings and conferences in connection with an original research paper. Conference course for two semesters. Prerequisite: For 679HA, upper-division standing and admission to the American Studies Honors Program; for 679HB, American Studies 679HA.

 


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Undergraduate Catalog
Contents
Chapter 1 - The University
Chapter 2 - School of Architecture
Chapter 3 - Red McCombs School of Business
Chapter 4 - College of Communication
Chapter 5 - College of Education
Chapter 6 - College of Engineering
Chapter 7 - College of Fine Arts
Chapter 8 - School of Information
Chapter 9 - College of Liberal Arts
Chapter 10 - College of Natural Sciences
Chapter 11 - School of Nursing
Chapter 12 - College of Pharmacy
Chapter 13 - School of Social Work
Chapter 14 - The Faculty
Texas Common Course Numbering System (Appendix A)
Appendix B - Degree and Course Abbreviations

Related Information
Catalogs
Course Schedules
Academic Calendars
Office of Admissions


Office of the Registrar
University of Texas at Austin

17 August 2004. Registrar's Web Team

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