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Undergrad 04-06

CONTENTS

CHAPTER 1
The University

CHAPTER 2
School of Architecture

CHAPTER 3
Red McCombs
School of Business

CHAPTER 4
College of Communication

CHAPTER 5
College of Education

CHAPTER 6
College of Engineering

CHAPTER 7
College of Fine Arts

CHAPTER 8
School of Information

CHAPTER 9
College of Liberal Arts

CHAPTER 10
College of
Natural Sciences

CHAPTER 11
School of Nursing

CHAPTER 12
College of Pharmacy

CHAPTER 13
School of Social Work

CHAPTER 14
The Faculty

Texas Common Course Numbering System
(Appendix A)

APPENDIX B
Degree and Course Abbreviations

 

    

9. College of Liberal Arts

Courses

--continued

 

The faculty has approval to offer the following courses in the academic years 2004-2005 and 2005-2006; however, not all courses are taught each semester or summer session. Students should consult the Course Schedule to determine which courses and topics will be offered during a particular semester or summer session. The Course Schedule may also reflect changes made to the course inventory after the publication of this catalog.

A full explanation of course numbers is given in General Information. In brief, the first digit of a course number indicates the semester hour value of the course. The second and third digits indicate the rank of the course: if they are 01 through 19, the course is of lower-division rank; if 20 through 79, of upper-division rank; if 80 through 99, of graduate rank.

Freshman/Forum Seminar

Freshman/Forum Seminar: F S

Lower-Division Courses

301. Freshman Seminar.
Restricted to first-semester freshmen. Small-group seminar involving reading, discussion, writing, and oral reports. Introduction to University resources, including libraries, computer and research facilities, and museums. Multiple sections are offered in the fall semester only, with various topics and instructors. Three lecture hours a week or two lecture hours and one hour of other academic activity a week for one semester.

118, 218, 318. Forum Seminar Series.
Restricted to freshmen and sophomores; others may enroll with consent of instructor. Lectures and discussions on various contemporary issues. Emphasis on multidisciplinary perspectives and critical discourse. For 118, two lecture hours a week for eight weeks; for 218, two lecture hours a week for one semester; for 318, three lecture hours a week for one semester, or two lecture hours and one hour of supervised research a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Department of Geography and the Environment

Unless otherwise stated below, each course meets for three lecture hours a week for one semester.

Geography: GRG

Lower-Division Courses

301C. The Natural Environment.
Geomorphic processes that shape the earth's surface; origin and evolution of landforms. Groundwater and water resources. Pedogenesis and soil properties. Three lecture hours and one and one-half laboratory hours a week for one semester, and a one-day field trip. May be counted toward the Area C requirement for the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I.

301K. Weather and Climate.
A survey of meteorological phenomena and climatological processes of the earth. May be counted toward the Area C requirement for the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I.

305. This Human World: An Introduction to Geography.
Introductory survey of the human geography of the earth; major cultural divisions and selected regions and countries. Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour a week for one semester.

306C. Conservation.
Introduction to environmental management, with emphasis on the major causes and consequences of environmental degradation. The course is organized around the premise that people cannot solve environmental problems unless they know how and why they occur; a major objective is to identify and understand the sociocultural forces that drive environmental degradation. Three lecture hours a week for one semester; additional laboratory/discussion hours are required. Geography 306C and 309 (Topic: Conservation) may not both be counted.

308. Computer Cartography.
An introduction to the computer languages, equipment, and techniques employed in modern automated cartography.

308C. Introduction to Computing in Geography.
An introduction to the use of computers in processing geographic information; hardware and operating systems for geographers; and geographic software. Three lecture hours a week for one semester; additional hours in the computer laboratory are required. Geography 308C and 360N may not both be counted.

309. Topics in Geography.
May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

312. Maps and Map Interpretation.
History of maps and mapping; types and uses; chief sources; reading and interpretation.

315. The City: An Introduction to Urban Geography.
Cities in history; international cities; urbanism in the United States: architecture, ethnicity, transportation, finance, housing, environmental impact. Self-paced.

319. Geography of Latin America.
Same as Latin American Studies 319. Adaptations to population growth and spatial integration in cultural landscapes of great natural and ethnic diversity; problems of frontiers and cities. Geography 319 and Latin American Studies 310 (Topic: Geography of Latin America) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Ability to use the World Wide Web.

119S, 219S, 319S, 419S, 519S, 619S, 719S, 819S, 919S. Topics in Geography.
This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Center for Global Educational Opportunities. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Geography and the Environment. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Upper-Division Courses

320K. Land and Life: The American Southwest.
Historical geography of the southwestern United States, emphasizing the ways of life of American Indian, Spanish, mestizo, and Anglo cultures. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, with one field trip to be arranged. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and familiarity with accessing the World Wide Web; students must have an e-mail address.

323K. Geography of South America.
Same as Latin American Studies 330 (Topic 3: Geography of South America). Ecological, cultural, and political challenges of the densely populated margins and sparsely populated interior frontier of South America; appropriate development and conservation pathways. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

324. Cultural Geography of North America.
The culture regions and cultural landscapes of the United States and Canada, with particular attention to ethnicity, diffusion, and adaptation. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

325. Geography of Texas.
Texas as an environmental and cultural borderland: as a transition zone between plains and mountains, humid and arid, South and West, Anglo-America and Latin America. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

326. Regions and Cultures of Europe.
Spatial patterns in Europe, with emphasis on cultural, historical, and political geography. Only one of the following may be counted: Geography 326; 385 (Topic: Regions and Cultures of Europe); Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies 345 (Topic 2: Regions and Cultures of Europe). Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

326K. Feast or Famine? Food Supplies in a Crowded World.
Food as a necessity, a commodity, and a bond of community; planetary production potential; and the challenges of population growth, climate change, land degradation, and food politics. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

327. Geography of the Former Soviet Union.
The land and peoples of the former Soviet Union, with an examination of such problems as ethnic tension, economic restructuring, and the quality of life. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

328. Geography of the Middle East.
Same as Middle Eastern Studies 322K (Topic 3: Geography of the Middle East). Major elements of physical and social environment in the region extending from Egypt to Afghanistan. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

328C. Pathways toward Extinction.
Past and present patterns and causes of animal extinction and habitat transformation; avenues toward restoration. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

129S, 229S, 329S, 429S, 529S, 629S, 729S, 829S, 929S. Topics in Geography.
This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Center for Global Educational Opportunities. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Geography and the Environment. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

331. Geography of Asia.
Same as Asian Studies 331. Natural regions and cultural landscapes of Asia, excluding the former Soviet Union. Asian Studies 361 (Topic: Geography of Asia) and Geography 331 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

331K. Cultural Ecology.
Same as Anthropology 324L (Topic 17: Cultural Ecology). Demography, settlement, resource opportunities, and adaptation in human ecosystems; application of past experience in dealing with contemporary and future problems. Geography 331K and Urban Studies 354 (Topic 1: Cultural Geography) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

333C. Severe and Unusual Weather.
In-depth discussion of inclement weather phenomena (tornadoes, tropical cyclones, floods, drought) and their effects on human beings, as well as the climatology of those types of weather events. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, with additional field hours to be arranged. Geography 333C and 356T (Topic: Severe and Unusual Weather) may not both be counted. May be counted toward the Area C requirement for the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I. Prerequisite: Geography 301K or consent of instructor.

333K. Climate Change.
Examines changes in climatic systems over both short and long time periods in relation to impacts on physical and ecological systems. Discusses past, present, and future changes in climatic conditions and the methods used to make those evaluations. Geography 333K and 356T (Topic: Climate Change) may not both be counted. May be counted toward the Area C requirement for the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and Geography 301C or 301K.

334. Conservation, Resources, and Technology.
Analysis of the relationship between the human population and its resource base, with particular emphasis on current problems in environmental resource management. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

334C. Environmental Hazards.
Earth science processes that affect human activities: soil, erosion, flooding, slope stability, earthquakes, volcanism, and water resources and quality. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; Geography 301C; and Geological Sciences 401, 303, or 312K, or the equivalent.

334K. Soils.
Morphology, genesis, properties, and distribution of world soils. Factors of soil formation. May be counted toward the Area C requirement for the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; and six semester hours of coursework in physical geography or one or more of the natural sciences, or the equivalent.

335C. Quaternary Landscapes.
Changing physical and biotic landscapes on the Ice Age earth during the last two million years. Reconstruction of Quaternary geomorphic landscapes based on principles and applications of geochronology and paleoclimatology. Geography 335C and 385C may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, and Geography 301C, Geological Sciences 401, or the equivalent.

335K. Mountain Geoecology.
Geological evolution of mountains. Physical geography of mountains: climates, soils, vegetation, landforms and geomorphic processes. May be counted toward the Area C requirement for the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and six semester hours of coursework in physical geography or one or more of the natural sciences.

335N. Landscape Ecology.
The study of spatial patterns in the earth's biosphere found within landscapes, typically areas measured in square kilometers. Examines the processes that create those patterns, drawing from ecology, biogeography, and many other disciplines. Also explores the practical applications of landscape ecology to the study of natural environments and those managed or altered by human activities. Geography 335N and 356T (Topic: Landscape Ecology) may not both be counted. May be counted toward the Area C requirement for the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and three semester hours of coursework in physical geography or one of the natural sciences.

336. Contemporary Cultural Geography.
Recent theoretical developments in cultural geographylandscape, culture area, ecosystem, and environmental perception. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

336C. National Parks and Protected Areas.
The history, purpose, and meaning of national parks (and preserves, refuges, and other publicly protected natural areas), from their inception at Yellowstone in 1872 to their present global distribution. Emphasis is on key management issues and dilemmas in the parks today; and the adoption and modification of Western notions of nature preservation within non-Western cultural settings. Geography 336C and 356 (Topic: National Parks and Protected Areas) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

337. The Modern American City.
Same as Architecture 350R (Topic 1: The Modern American City) and Urban Studies 352 (Topic 1: The Modern American City). Issues facing residents of U.S. cities, such as transportation and housing, poverty and crime, metropolitan finance, environmental and architectural design; historical/comparative urban evolution. Prerequisite: For architecture majors, Architecture 328; for others, upper-division standing.

338C. Rivers and Landscapes: Fluvial Geomorphology.
Drainage basin evolution and channel adjustment, variability of river systems in differing geomorphic regimes, relationships between fluvial systems and other components of physical geography, and the role of humans as geomorphic agents. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, with additional field hours to be arranged. May be counted toward the Area C requirement for the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; and Geography 301C or Geological Sciences 401, or the equivalent.

339. Process Geomorphology.
Analysis of geomorphic processes and their effects on landform development. May be counted toward the Area C requirement for the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; and Geography 301C, Geological Sciences 401, or the equivalent.

339K. Environment, Development, and Food Production.
Assessment of various types of nonmechanized agriculture with regard to environmental factors and management techniques. Geography 339K and 390S may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

340D. Political Ecology of Globalization and Environmental Degradation.
Study of current environmental problems from the perspective of political ecology, which critically examines political, economic, and social relations between humans and the natural world. Uses case studies from Africa, Latin America, Asia, and the Middle East to address climate change, deforestation, desertification, biodiversity, and environmental justice. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

341K. Geography of Mexico and Caribbean America.
Same as Latin American Studies 330 (Topic 2: Geography of Mexico and Caribbean America). The natural regions and cultural landscapes of Mexico, Central America, and the West Indies. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

342C. Rural Development in the Third World.
Same as Asian Studies 342C. Prospects for expanding goods and services available to the rural poor in developing countries. Asian Studies 361 (Topic: Rural Development in the Third World) and Geography 342C may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

346. The Human Use of the Earth.
The state of the world from an ecological perspective. Case studies are drawn from a wide range of ecological settings and involve both traditional and modern societies. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

347K. The Spanish Background of Hispanic America.
Same as Anthropology 322M (Topic 9: The Spanish Background of Hispanic America) and Latin American Studies 330 (Topic 1: The Spanish Background of Hispanic America). Prehistoric and Roman origins of Mediterranean land use and settlement; late medieval economy and institutions; conquest and the transformation of Spanish culture in the New World, with emphasis on colonial Mexico. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

348C. Geography of South Asia.
Same as Asian Studies 348C. Natural regions and cultural landscapes of South Asia. Agriculture, urban structure, issues of environment and development. Asian Studies 361 (Topic: Geography of South Asia) and Geography 348C may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

350L. Oxford Summer Study I: British Landscapes.
Study of landscape transformations on the British Isles from ancient to modern times. Involves lectures at Oxford University as well as excursions to various sites in Britain. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

351. Oxford Summer Study II: Nature and Society.
Explores the creation of cultural environments, with an emphasis on the British countryside. Lectures at Oxford University are combined with numerous field excursions. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

356. Topics in Environmental Geography.
Topics include environmental assessment methods and techniques, the conservation movement, and climate and people. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

356C. Geo-Archaeology and Environmental History.
Long-term ecology as reconstructed from settlement and land-use histories. Empirical case studies in environmental history from the Mediterranean region, the Near East, and Mesoamerica. Applications to degradation, desertification, sustainability, and global change. Only one of the following may be counted: Anthropology 382N, Geography 356 (Topic: Geo-Archaeology), 356C, 382K. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

356T. Topics in Geography.
May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

357. Medical Geography.
Same as American Studies 357. The geographic distribution, expansion, and contraction of the infectious diseases that have the greatest influence in shaping human societies today: malaria, AIDS, and others. American Studies 321 (Topic: Medical Geography) and Geography 357 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

358. Cities in Developing Countries.
Same as Asian Studies 358. Comparative analysis of demographic, social, economic, and political features of cities in Latin America, the Middle East, Asia, and Africa; emphasis on regional imbalance, migration, occupational and social stratification, housing the poor, and suburbanization. Possibilities for individual research. Asian Studies 361 (Topic: Cities in Developing Countries) and Geography 358 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

358E. Geography and Religion.
Same as Humanities 350 (Topic 3: Geography and Religion) and Middle Eastern Studies 322K (Topic 15: Geography and Religion). Ideas about the relationships among the natural world, myth, and ritual; principal focus on Christianity, Islam, and Judaism and their offshoots and antagonists in the Western world. Geography 356T (Topic: Geography and Religion) and 358E may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

460C. The Geographer's Craft.
A comprehensive introductory survey of research techniques used in contemporary geography. The course uses the problem-solving approach to teach technical skills and concepts drawn from cartography, remote sensing, geographical information systems, spatial statistics, and maps and map interpretation. Three lecture hours and one and one-half laboratory hours a week for one semester. Geography 859A and 460C may not both be counted; Geography 859B and 460C may not both be counted.

360G. Environmental Geographic Information Systems.
An introduction to the creation and use of geographic information systems. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

360L. Spatial Analysis.
Application of statistical techniques to spatial problems: research and experimental design, hypothesis testing and sampling, with reference to spatial patterns and areal associations. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

360N. Computer Applications in Geography.
Three lecture hours a week for one semester; additional hours in the computer laboratory are required. Geography 308C and 360N may not both be counted.

462K. Introduction to Remote Sensing of the Environment.
The use of electromagnetic energy to sense objects in the natural environment; interpretation and recognition of patterns detected by sensors. Three lecture hours and one and one-half laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

363C. Topics in Middle East Geography.
Topics may include arid lands ecology in the Mediterranean basin, historical and imaginative geographies of the Middle East, and environment and development in the Middle East. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Geography 328 or Middle Eastern Studies 301L.

464K. Advanced Remote Sensing and Pattern Analysis.
Advanced classification techniques for satellite image processing and landscape pattern analysis. Three lecture hours and one and one-half discussion hours a week for one semester. Geography 356T (Topic: Advanced Remote Sensing and Pattern Analysis) and 464K may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, and Geography 462K (or 362K) or the equivalent or consent of instructor.

366C. Comparative Ecosystems.
The important ecosystem processes that affect the distributions, characteristics, and management of natural environments at landscape, regional, and continental scales. Ecosystem functions, including nutrient cycling, water balance, and the role of natural disturbances in a wide range of ecosystems, from the tundra to the rain forests and grasslands of the tropics. Geography 356T (Topic: Comparative Ecosystems) and 366C may not both be counted. May be counted towards the Area C requirement for the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and three semester hours of coursework in physical geography or one of the natural sciences.

366K. Biogeography.
Contemporary patterns of plant and animal distribution, and the environmental and historical processes affecting them. May be counted toward the Area C requirement for the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and three semester hours of coursework in physical geography or one of the natural sciences.

367K. Vegetation Ecology.
Plant autecology and synecology. Ecological factors and processes of plant communities. Vegetation geoecology, succession, and dynamics. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and six semester hours of coursework in physical geography or one or more of the natural sciences.

470C. Advanced Geographic Information Systems.
Study of methods of spatial analysis, design and implementation of a geographic information system, vector and raster modeling, and advanced applications of geographic information systems. Three lecture hours and one and one-half laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Geography 360G and consent of instructor.

372K. Proseminar in Environmental Geography.
Applied geographical analysis of environmental and resource issues in the context of specific field problems. Prerequisite: Six semester hours of coursework in geography from the environmental resource management track.

373F. Field Techniques.
Introduction to the collection and mapping of environmental and cultural data, involving both classroom lectures and outdoor exercises. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, a major in geography, consent of instructor, and ability to use the World Wide Web; students must have an e-mail address.

373K. Field Methods for Landscape Characterization.
The design of research questions and the acquisition of data for the characterization of landscapes. Utilizes geographical and ecological field-based methods. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and Geography 301C or the equivalent.

374. Frontiers in Geography.
Restricted to geography majors and students seeking a secondary school teaching certificate with geography as the second teaching field. Current concerns and methodology in the field of geography; an introduction to theory and research in geography. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester, with one field trip to be arranged. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and consent of the undergraduate adviser.

476T. Topics in Geography.
Three lecture hours and one and one-half laboratory hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

679H. Honors Tutorial Course.
For honors candidates in geography. Individual reading of selected works for one semester, followed in the second semester by the writing of an honors thesis. Regular conferences with the faculty supervisor are also required. Conference course for two semesters. Prerequisite: For 679HA, admission to the Geography Honors Program no later than two semesters before expected graduation; for 679HB, Geography 679HA. A University grade point average of at least 3.00 and a grade point average in geography of at least 3.50 are required for admission to the Geography Honors Program.

379K. Conference Course.
Supervised individual study of selected problems in geography. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in one or more of the social or natural sciences, and consent of instructor.

379L. Practicum: Internships in Applied Geography.
Research and staff experience working in an appropriate government agency or private business. At least six but no more than nine hours of work a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Completion of at least seventy semester hours of coursework, including twelve semester hours of geography, and consent of the undergraduate adviser.

Urban Studies: URB

Lower-Division Courses

301. Introduction to Urban Studies.
A multidisciplinary study of cities and complex urban environments; historical and contemporary issues from both national and international perspectives.

305. Introductory Topics in Urban Studies.
An introduction to urban studies within the framework of different disciplines. Topics include urban history, urban education, politics and governance, economics, design and planning, and society and culture. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

315. Urban Studies Research Methods.
An introduction to urban studies research methodologies. Includes sources of urban data, the use of the library in urban research, formulating research questions, research design, methods commonly used in urban research, the use of computers to store and manipulate quantitative urban data, and an introduction to data analysis and theoretical and practical applications of urban research. Prerequisite: Mathematics 408C or 408K with a grade of at least C; Mathematics 316 or the equivalent with a grade of at least C; and Urban Studies 301 or consent of instructor.

Upper-Division Courses

325. Special Topics in Urban Studies.
Additional hours may be required for some topics; these are identified in the Course Schedule. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

350. Topics in Urban Politics and Governance.
The basic political and administrative structures of cities and metropolitan regions, including problems associated with local and regional government. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: Urban Politics. Same as Government 370L (Topic 11: Urban Politics). Prerequisite: Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

351. Topics in Urban Economics.
Urban economics and the application of economic analysis to urban concerns, including economic development, urbanization, urban form, public finance, and competition. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: Development Problems and Policies in Latin America. Same as Economics 355 and Latin American Studies 355 (Topic 1: Development Problems and Policies in Latin America). Description of the Latin American economy; business and market organization; problem of growth (involving credit, public finance, trade, investment aspects). Prerequisite: Economics 304K with a grade of at least C.

Topic 2: Urban Economics. Same as Economics 334K. Economic analysis of urban areas; emphasis on the nature of current urban problemsslums, transportation, financeand an evaluation of current policy. Prerequisite: Economics 420K (or 320K) with a grade of at least C.

Topic 3: Regional Economics. Same as Economics 334L. Spatial aspects of economics, including concepts, theories, and policy applications. Prerequisite: Economics 420K (or 320K) with a grade of at least C.

352. Topics in Urban Design and Planning.
Issues concerning the built environment and urban infrastructure, environmental sustainability, and the public policy framework designed to manage the challenges presented by these issues. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: The Modern American City. Same as Architecture 350R (Topic 1: The Modern American City) and Geography 337. Issues facing residents of U.S. cities, such as transportation and housing, poverty and crime, metropolitan finance, environmental and architectural design; historical/comparative urban evolution. Prerequisite: For architecture majors, Architecture 328; for others, upper-division standing.

Topic 2: Housing America. Same as Architecture 350R (Topic 2: Housing America).

Topic 3: Urban Design Practice. Same as Architecture 350R (Topic 3: Urban Design Practice).

Topic 4: Economy/Value/Quality of Life. Same as Architecture 350R (Topic 4: Economy/Value/Quality of Life).

353. Topics in Urban History.
The historical evolution of cities, contemporary urban development trends, and the links between social development and physical form. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Some topics partially fulfill legislative requirement for American history; these are identified in the Course Schedule. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 2: Texas, 1914 to the Present. Same as History 320R and Mexican American Studies 374 (Topic 16: Texas, 1914 to the Present). The steady dissociation of Texas from its Old South status to a transitional state and a power in national politics. Three semester hours of Texas history may be substituted for half of the legislative requirement for American history. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

Topic 5: Environmental History of North America. Same as American Studies 329 and History 350L (Topic 4: Environmental History of North America). Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

Topic 6: Latin American Cities, 1830-1930. Same as History 350L (Topic 36: Latin American Cities, 1830-1930) and Latin American Studies 366 (Topic 14: Latin American Cities, 1830-1930). Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

354. Topics in Urban Society and Culture.
Topics on the social and cultural diversity within cities; social policies; and the sociocultural impact of the media and other institutions on urban development. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Some topics partially fulfill legislative requirement for American history; these are identified in the Course Schedule. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 2: Society of Modern Mexico. Same as Latin American Studies 325 (Topic 1: Society of Modern Mexico) and Sociology 335. Family, community, industrialization, and urbanization in modern Mexico.

Topic 4: The Culture of Cities. Same as American Studies 370 (Topic 13: The Culture of Cities).

Topic 5: Ideologies of Poverty. Same as Anthropology 324L (Topic 14: Ideologies of Poverty). Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

Topic 6: The City and Urbanization. Same as Sociology 346. Examination of urbanization from a cross-national perspective: discrimination and racial inequality in urban labor markets. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

360. Internship and Service Learning.
Internship experience in an urban studies-related public or nonprofit agency. Students have the opportunity to apply the knowledge, theory, and understanding gained from courses in their areas of specialization to urban issues in a professional setting. Approximately five to ten hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Urban Studies 301 and 315, and upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

370. Senior Project.
Students identify an urban issue, develop a position paper, and work closely with a faculty adviser on a project. Students may use text or other media (such as video or portfolio) to present their arguments. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, and Urban Studies 301, 315, and 360 with a grade of at least C in each.

379. Conference Course.
Supervised individual study of selected problems in urban studies. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and consent of instructor and the undergraduate adviser.

679H. Honors Tutorial Course.
Directed reading and research or creation of an honors project, followed by the writing of a thesis. Conference course for two semesters. Prerequisite: For 679HA, admission to the Urban Studies Honors Program and consent of the urban studies adviser; for 679HB, Urban Studies 679HA.

 


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Undergraduate Catalog
Contents
Chapter 1 - The University
Chapter 2 - School of Architecture
Chapter 3 - Red McCombs School of Business
Chapter 4 - College of Communication
Chapter 5 - College of Education
Chapter 6 - College of Engineering
Chapter 7 - College of Fine Arts
Chapter 8 - School of Information
Chapter 9 - College of Liberal Arts
Chapter 10 - College of Natural Sciences
Chapter 11 - School of Nursing
Chapter 12 - College of Pharmacy
Chapter 13 - School of Social Work
Chapter 14 - The Faculty
Texas Common Course Numbering System (Appendix A)
Appendix B - Degree and Course Abbreviations

Related Information
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Course Schedules
Academic Calendars
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University of Texas at Austin

17 August 2004. Registrar's Web Team

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