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Undergrad 04-06

CONTENTS

CHAPTER 1
The University

CHAPTER 2
School of Architecture

CHAPTER 3
Red McCombs
School of Business

CHAPTER 4
College of Communication

CHAPTER 5
College of Education

CHAPTER 6
College of Engineering

CHAPTER 7
College of Fine Arts

CHAPTER 8
School of Information

CHAPTER 9
College of Liberal Arts

CHAPTER 10
College of
Natural Sciences

CHAPTER 11
School of Nursing

CHAPTER 12
College of Pharmacy

CHAPTER 13
School of Social Work

CHAPTER 14
The Faculty

Texas Common Course Numbering System
(Appendix A)

APPENDIX B
Degree and Course Abbreviations

 

    

9. College of Liberal Arts

Courses

--continued

 

The faculty has approval to offer the following courses in the academic years 2004-2005 and 2005-2006; however, not all courses are taught each semester or summer session. Students should consult the Course Schedule to determine which courses and topics will be offered during a particular semester or summer session. The Course Schedule may also reflect changes made to the course inventory after the publication of this catalog.

A full explanation of course numbers is given in General Information. In brief, the first digit of a course number indicates the semester hour value of the course. The second and third digits indicate the rank of the course: if they are 01 through 19, the course is of lower-division rank; if 20 through 79, of upper-division rank; if 80 through 99, of graduate rank.

Department of Linguistics

Unless otherwise stated below, each course meets for three lecture hours a week for one semester.

American Sign Language: ASL

Lower-Division Courses

506. First-Year American Sign Language I.
Introduction to American Sign Language. Five lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. American Sign Language 506 and Communication Sciences and Disorders 506 may not both be counted.

507. First-Year American Sign Language II.
American Sign Language vocabulary and basic sentence structure. Five lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. American Sign Language 507 and Communication Sciences and Disorders 507 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: American Sign Language 506 (or Communication Sciences and Disorders 506) with a grade of at least C.

312K. Second-Year American Sign Language I.
Development of conversational skills in American Sign Language. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. American Sign Language 312K and Communication Sciences and Disorders 312K may not both be counted. Prerequisite: American Sign Language 507 (or Communication Sciences and Disorders 507) with a grade of at least C.

312L. Second-Year American Sign Language II.
Further development of conversational skills in American Sign Language; introduction to American Sign Language literature and folklore. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. American Sign Language 312L and Communication Sciences and Disorders 312L may not both be counted. Prerequisite: American Sign Language 312K (or Communication Sciences and Disorders 312K) with a grade of at least C.

Upper-Division Course

320. Advanced American Sign Language Conversation.
Advanced development of conversational skills in American Sign Language, with a focus on sophisticated linguistic structures and important issues in deaf studies. Prerequisite: American Sign Language 312L with a grade of at least C.

Linguistics: LIN

Lower-Division Courses

306. Introduction to the Study of Language.
Survey of major areas of linguistics: sound systems, grammatical structures, historical development of languages, language families and linguistic universals, dialect differences and their social significance.

312. Interdisciplinary Approaches to Language.
An interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary introduction to the manifold aspects of language. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

315. Speech Science.
Same as Communication Sciences and Disorders 315S. Physiological and acoustical bases of speech production; theories of motor control of speech; laboratory techniques in speech science research.

119S, 219S, 319S, 419S, 519S, 619S, 719S, 819S, 919S. Topics in Linguistics.
This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Center for Global Educational Opportunities. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Linguistics. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Upper-Division Courses

321L.American English.
Same as English 321L. An overview of the historical development of English in the Americas. Attention to regional, social, and ethnic differences, and their implications for public education. Prerequisite: Rhetoric and Composition 306 and English 316K or their equivalents, and three additional semester hours of lower-division coursework in either English or rhetoric and composition.

322. Gypsy Language and Culture.
Linguistic introduction to Romani; relationship to languages of India; history from 280 BC; modern dialects and international standard language; history and culture as reflected in the language. Only one of the following may be counted: Asian Studies 372 (Topic 13: Gypsy Language and Culture); Linguistics 322; Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies 325 (Topic 1: Gypsy Language and Culture). Prerequisite: Linguistics 306 or consent of instructor.

323L. English as a World Language.
Same as English 323L. An account of the spread of English around the world; national, social, and regional varieties. Prerequisite: Rhetoric and Composition 306 and English 316K or their equivalents, and three additional semester hours of lower-division coursework in either English or rhetoric and composition.

325. Introduction to the Study of African American English.
Same as African and African American Studies 320 (Topic 1: Introduction to the Study of African American English). African American English: evolution, contemporary styles, comparison with other ethnic dialects; attitudes toward African American English, effects in education, controversy about dialect differences and intellectual abilities. Prerequisite: Linguistics 306 or consent of instructor.

129S, 229S, 329S, 429S, 529S, 629S, 729S, 829S, 929S. Topics in Linguistics.
This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Center for Global Educational Opportunities. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Linguistics. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

340. Automata Theory.
Introduction to the formal study of automata and of related formal languages. Only one of the following may be counted: Computer Sciences 341, 341H, Linguistics 340. Prerequisite: Computer Sciences 336 or consent of instructor.

344K. Phonetics: The Production and Perception of Speech Sounds.
Articulation and transcription of speech sounds; distinctive feature systems; physiological and acoustical aspects of phonetics; common phonological processes. Prerequisite: Linguistics 306.

345. Language Change and Language Variation.
Prerequisite: Linguistics 344K.

350. Special Topics in the Study of Language.
Nontechnical examination of social, educational, and political problems to which current linguistic knowledge is relevant. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: Language and the Brain. Same as Communication Sciences and Disorders 350. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

Topic 2: Language and Thought. Study of the relation between language and thought, using a cognitive science approach. Examines the words people use and how people think; whether language structure affects thought; and some cognitive aspects of language. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

357. Undergraduate Research.
Supervised research experience. May be repeated for credit. Offered on the pass/fail basis only. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, Linguistics 306 with a grade of at least C, and consent of instructor.

360K. Introduction to English Grammar.
Introduction to the study of the syntactic structure of modern English from the viewpoint of generative grammar. English 360K and Linguistics 360K may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

364M. History of the English Language.
Same as English 364M. Development of sounds, forms, and vocabulary of the English language from its origins to the present. Prerequisite: Rhetoric and Composition 306 and English 316K or their equivalents, and three additional semester hours of lower-division coursework in either English or rhetoric and composition.

372K. Sound Patterns: From Sound to Word.
Methods and principles of analyzing the sound systems of languages. Prerequisite: Linguistics 344K.

372L. Syntax and Semantics: The Structure and Meaning of Utterances.
Methods and principles of describing the syntactic systems of languages. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and Linguistics 306.

373. Topics in Linguistics and Related Disciplines.
Introduction to the study of the areas of linguistics that involve other disciplines, such as sociolinguistics, psycholinguistics, mathematical methods in linguistics. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: Child Language. Examination of theory and research concerning the development of language in the child. Only one of the following may be counted: Linguistics 373 (Topic 1), 373 (Topic: Language Acquisition), Psychology 333P. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

Topic 2: Language and Speech in American Society. Same as American Studies 321 (Topic 2: Language and Speech in American Society), Anthropology 325N, and Sociology 352M (Topic 3: Language and Speech in American Society). Prerequisite: Anthropology 302, 305, 307, or Linguistics 306; or consent of instructor.

Topic 3: Language in Culture and Society. Same as Anthropology 325M and Sociology 352M (Topic 4: Language in Culture and Society). Language as a cultural resource; functions of language in society; survey of language communities. Prerequisite: Anthropology 302, 305, 307, or Linguistics 306; or consent of instructor.

Topic 4: Concepts in Judaic Culture. Same as English 379N (Topic 3: Concepts in Judaic Culture) and Middle Eastern Studies 321K (Topic 1: Concepts in Judaic Culture). Linguistics 373 (Topic 4) and Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures 341 (Topic 6: Concepts in Judaic Culture) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Rhetoric and Composition 306 and English 316K or their equivalents, and three additional semester hours of lower-division coursework in either English or rhetoric and composition.

Topic 5: Sociolinguistics of German-Speaking Society. Same as Germanic Civilization 327E (Topic 3: Sociolinguistics of German-Speaking Society). Prerequisite: Upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

Topic 6: The Structure of the German Language. Same as German 369 (Topic 1: The Structure of the German Language). Only one of the following may be counted: German 369 (Topic: German Dialectology), Linguistics 373 (Topic 6), 373 (Topic: German Dialectology). Prerequisite: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in German, or fourteen semester hours of lower-division coursework in German and six semester hours of coursework in linguistics.

Topic 7: Introduction to Cognitive Science. Same as Cognitive Science 360 (Topic 1: Introduction to Cognitive Science) and Philosophy 365 (Topic 2: Introduction to Cognitive Science). Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

Topic 8: German and English: Historical Perspectives. Same as Anthropology 320L (Topic 8: German and English: Historical Perspectives), Classical Civilization 348 (Topic 8: German and English: Historical Perspectives), and Germanic Civilization 327E (Topic 9: German and English: Historical Perspectives). Only one of the following may be counted: Anthropology 320L (Topic 9: The German Language: Historical Perspectives), Classical Civilization 348 (Topic 9: The German Language: Historical Perspectives), German 369 (Topic 4: The German Language: Historical Perspectives), Linguistics 373 (Topic 8), 373 (Topic 9: The German Language: Historical Perspectives). Prerequisite: For English majors, completion of at least thirty semester hours of coursework, including English 316K or the equivalent; for others, upper-division standing.

Topic 9: The German Language: Historical Perspectives. Same as Anthropology 320L (Topic 9: The German Language: Historical Perspectives), Classical Civilization 348 (Topic 9: The German Language: Historical Perspectives), and German 369 (Topic 4: The German Language: Historical Perspectives). Only one of the following may be counted: Anthropology 320L (Topic 8: German and English: Historical Perspectives), Classical Civilization 348 (Topic 8: German and English: Historical Perspectives), Germanic Civilization 327E (Topic 9: German and English: Historical Perspectives), Linguistics 373 (Topic 8: German and English: Historical Perspectives), 373 (Topic 9). Prerequisite: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in German, or fourteen hours of coursework in German and six hours of coursework in linguistics.

374M. Sociolinguistics.
Same as Anthropology 374M. An in-depth treatment of current interests in sociolinguistic research literature. Subjects include language and gender; social, regional, and ethnic dialects of American English; language use in African American communities; language and identity in a pluralistic society; and language, literacy, and education. Prerequisite: Anthropology 302 or Linguistics 306.

379. Conference Course in Linguistics.
Supervised individual study of selected problems in linguistics. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in linguistics.

679H. Honors Tutorial Course.
Supervised individual reading for one semester, followed by research and writing to produce a substantial paper. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: For 679HA, admission to the Linguistics Honors Program; for 679HB, Linguistics 679HA.

 


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Undergraduate Catalog
Contents
Chapter 1 - The University
Chapter 2 - School of Architecture
Chapter 3 - Red McCombs School of Business
Chapter 4 - College of Communication
Chapter 5 - College of Education
Chapter 6 - College of Engineering
Chapter 7 - College of Fine Arts
Chapter 8 - School of Information
Chapter 9 - College of Liberal Arts
Chapter 10 - College of Natural Sciences
Chapter 11 - School of Nursing
Chapter 12 - College of Pharmacy
Chapter 13 - School of Social Work
Chapter 14 - The Faculty
Texas Common Course Numbering System (Appendix A)
Appendix B - Degree and Course Abbreviations

Related Information
Catalogs
Course Schedules
Academic Calendars
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Office of the Registrar
University of Texas at Austin

17 August 2004. Registrar's Web Team

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