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Undergrad 04-06

CONTENTS

CHAPTER 1
The University

CHAPTER 2
School of Architecture

CHAPTER 3
Red McCombs
School of Business

CHAPTER 4
College of Communication

CHAPTER 5
College of Education

CHAPTER 6
College of Engineering

CHAPTER 7
College of Fine Arts

CHAPTER 8
School of Information

CHAPTER 9
College of Liberal Arts

CHAPTER 10
College of
Natural Sciences

CHAPTER 11
School of Nursing

CHAPTER 12
College of Pharmacy

CHAPTER 13
School of Social Work

CHAPTER 14
The Faculty

Texas Common Course Numbering System
(Appendix A)

APPENDIX B
Degree and Course Abbreviations

 

    

9. College of Liberal Arts

Courses

--continued

 

The faculty has approval to offer the following courses in the academic years 2004-2005 and 2005-2006; however, not all courses are taught each semester or summer session. Students should consult the Course Schedule to determine which courses and topics will be offered during a particular semester or summer session. The Course Schedule may also reflect changes made to the course inventory after the publication of this catalog.

A full explanation of course numbers is given in General Information. In brief, the first digit of a course number indicates the semester hour value of the course. The second and third digits indicate the rank of the course: if they are 01 through 19, the course is of lower-division rank; if 20 through 79, of upper-division rank; if 80 through 99, of graduate rank.

Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies

Unless otherwise stated below, each course meets for three lecture hours a week for one semester.

Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies: REE

Lower-Division Courses

301. Introduction to Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies.
An introduction to the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe through each of the major disciplines represented in the program: language, literature, anthropology, geography, history, government, sociology, and economics. History 306N (Topic 4: Introduction to Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies: History) and Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies 301 may not both be counted. Government 314 (Topic 4: Introduction to Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies: Political Science) and Russian, East European, and Studies 301 may not both be counted. Core course required for a degree in Russian, East European, and Eurasian studies.

302. Topics in Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies.
May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

119S, 219S, 319S, 419S, 519S, 619S, 719S, 819S, 919S. Topics in Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies.
This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Center for Global Educational Opportunities. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Upper-Division Courses

320. Introduction to an East European Language.
An overview of the structure and vocabulary of an East European language necessary for a reading knowledge of the language. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. May not be used to fulfill the foreign language requirement for any degree.

321. Topics in Russian or Eastern European Politics.
May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

325. Topics in Language, Literature, and Culture.
May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Fulfills the basic Russian, East European, and Eurasian studies requirement in language, literature, and culture. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: Gypsy Language and Culture. Linguistic introduction to Romani; relationship to languages of India; history from 280 BC; modern dialects and international standard language; history and culture as reflected in the language. Only one of the following may be counted: Asian Studies 372 (Topic 13: Gypsy Language and Culture); Linguistics 322; Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies 325 (Topic 1). Prerequisite: Linguistics 306 or consent of instructor.

Topic 3: Readings in Russian Literature I. Prose and poetry of the first half of the nineteenth century. Russian 320K and Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies 325 (Topic 3) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Russian 612, 312L, or the equivalent.

Topic 4: Readings in Russian Literature II. Prose and poetry of the second half of the nineteenth century. Russian 320L and Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies 325 (Topic 4) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Russian 612, 312L, or the equivalent.

Topic 5: The Polish Experience. Same as Polish 324 (Topic 1: The Polish Experience). A historical, sociopolitical picture of Poland's complex cultural history. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

Topic 6: Survey of Twentieth-Century Russian Literature I. Short prose, poetry, and drama, 1890 to 1930. Russian 670A and Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies 325 (Topic 6) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in Russian or consent of instructor.

Topic 7: Survey of Twentieth-Century Russian Literature II. Short prose, poetry, and drama, 1930 to the present. Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies 325 (Topic 7) and Russian 670B may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies 325 (Topic 6).

Topic 8: Yiddish Drama and Film in Translation. Same as English 322 (Topic 34: Yiddish Drama and Film in Translation), Germanic Civilization 327E (Topic 8: Yiddish Drama and Film in Translation), Jewish Studies 361 (Topic 5: Yiddish Drama and Film in Translation), and Slavic 324 (Topic 2: Yiddish Drama and Film in Translation). Jewish life in Poland and Russia before the Holocaust, and the transition to American Jewish life, as revealed in plays and films produced in Eastern Europe and in the United States. No knowledge of Yiddish is required. Prerequisite: For English majors, Rhetoric and Composition 306 and English 316K or their equivalents, and three additional semester hours of lower-division coursework in either English or rhetoric and composition; for others, upper-division standing.

Topic 9: The Russian Novel. Same as English 322 (Topic 37: The Russian Novel) and Russian 356 (Topic 1: The Russian Novel). European Studies 361 (Topic: The Russian Novel) and Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies 325 (Topic 9) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: For English majors, Rhetoric and Composition 306 and English 316K or their equivalents, and three additional semester hours of lower-division coursework in either English or rhetoric and composition; for others, upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

129S, 229S, 329S, 429S, 529S, 629S, 729S, 829S, 929S. Topics in Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies.
This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Center for Global Educational Opportunities. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

330. Introduction to the Culture and Society of Eastern Europe.
A survey of literature, art, architecture, and music from an East European country. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

335. Topics in History, Economics, and Government.
May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Fulfills the basic Russian, East European, and Eurasian studies requirement in history, economics, and government. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: Marxist Economics. An introduction to the Marxian economic theory of capitalism through the study of Karl Marx's Capital, volume I, and of its contemporary relevance. Economics 357K and Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies 335 (Topic 1) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, and Economics 304K and 304L with a grade of at least C in each; or consent of instructor.

Topic 2: Governments and Politics of Eastern Europe. Same as Government 324J and European Studies 361 (Topic 14: Governments and Politics of Eastern Europe). Prerequisite: Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

Topic 3: Governments and Politics of Russia. Issues of nationalism and state-building facing Russia and its neighbors. Evaluation of the post-Soviet experience from the perspectives of both domestic and foreign policy. Government 336M and Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies 335 (Topic 3) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

Topic 4: Politics in Southeast Europe. Only one of the following may be counted: European Studies 361 (Topic 13: Politics in Southeast Europe); Government 328N; Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies 335 (Topic 4). Prerequisite: Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

Topic 5: History of Russia to 1917. Same as History 343L. Survey of Russian history from seventeenth-century Muscovy to the fall of the Romanovs in 1917. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

Topic 6: History of Russia since 1917. Same as History 343M. A survey of Russian history from the revolution of 1917 to the collapse of the Soviet Union. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

Topic 7: Political Development in Eastern Europe and Latin America. Only one of the following may be counted: Government 365N (Topic 4: Political Development in Eastern Europe and Latin America); Latin American Studies 337M (Topic 6: Political Development in Eastern Europe and Latin America); Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies 335 (Topic 7).

Topic 8: Politics in Southern Europe. Comparative analysis of development politics in capitalist and socialist systems in southwestern and southeastern Europe. Only one of the following may be counted: European Studies 361 (Topic 12: Politics in Southern Europe); Government 328M; Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies 335 (Topic 8). Prerequisite: Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

Topic 9: German Unification: Problems and Prospects. Same as Germanic Civilization 360E (Topic 4: German Unification: Problems and Prospects) and Government 365N (Topic 7: German Unification: Problems and Prospects). A brief history of Germany since 1815, the contemporary German state and its institutions, and perspectives for the current decade. Only one of the following may be counted: Germanic Civilization 360E (Topic: German Reunification: Problems and Prospects); Government 365N (Topic: German Reunification: Problems and Prospects); Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies 335 (Topic 9). Prerequisite: For government majors, six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government; for others, upper-division standing.

Topic 10: The Military in Politics. Only one of the following may be counted: Government 365N (Topic 3: The Military in Politics); Latin American Studies 337M (Topic 9: The Military in Politics); Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies 335 (Topic 10). Prerequisite: Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

Topic 11: Germany in the Twentieth Century. Same as History 337N. Survey of German political and military institutions, economic development, culture, and society. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

Topic 12: Stalinist Russia. Same as History 350L (Topic 41: Stalinist Russia). Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and consent of instructor.

Topic 13: Russian Economic Development since 1917. The growth of the planned economy in industry, agriculture, and labor. Economics 346K and Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies 335 (Topic 13) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Economics 304K and 304L with a grade of at least C in each, and six additional semester hours of coursework in social science; or consent of instructor.

Topic 14: Political Economy of International Crisis. Examines several dimensions of the ongoing crises in the world economic order and the interrelationships among them. Problem areas covered are neoliberalism, international money, debt, famine, immigration, and energy shocks. Only one of the following may be counted: Economics 350K (Topic 3: Political Economy of International Crisis); 357L; Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies 335 (Topic 14). Prerequisite: Economics 304K and 304L with a grade of at least C in each, and six additional semester hours of coursework in social science.

Topic 15: Understanding the Cold War. Same as Government 360N (Topic 4: Understanding the Cold War). Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

345. Topics in Sociology, Geography, and Anthropology.
May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Fulfills the basic Russian, East European, and Eurasian studies requirement in sociology, geography, and anthropology. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: Post-Soviet Societies. Only one of the following may be counted: Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies 345 (Topic 1); Sociology 321K (Topic 1: Post-Soviet Societies); Women's and Gender Studies 345 (Topic: Post-Soviet Societies); Women's Studies 345 (Topic: Post-Soviet Societies).

Topic 2: Regions and Cultures of Europe. Spatial patterns in Europe, with emphasis on cultural, historical, and political geography. Only one of the following may be counted: Geography 326; 385 (Topic: Regions and Cultures of Europe); Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies 345 (Topic 2). Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

Topic 3: Shamanism in Central Asia. Same as Anthropology 324L (Topic 30: Shamanism in Central Asia); Middle Eastern Studies 326 (Topic 1: Shamanism in Central Asia); and Religious Studies 342 (Topic 1: Shamanism in Central Asia). Only one of the following may be counted: Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures 340 (Topic 4: Shamanism in Central Asia); Religious Studies 352 (Topic 1: Shamanism in Central Asia); 361 (Topic: Shamanism in Central Asia); Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies 345 (Topic 3). Prerequisite: Upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

350. European Literature: East and West.
A study of selected major works of East European literature and their relationships to West European literary movements. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and consent of instructor.

351. Reading Seminar: Transitions in Russia and Eastern Europe.
First in a sequence of three courses. Students explore transitions from communism in a broad comparative and interdisciplinary context. Through reading, discussion, and training in research methods, students prepare for the research portion of the sequence by defining and planning a project. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, admission to the Transitions Program, and consent of instructor.

352. Research Seminar: Transitions in Russia and Eastern Europe.
Second in a sequence of three courses. Students carry out research planned in Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies 351 and meet with local experts in Berlin, Prague, and Moscow. Research facilitates more specialized examination of important currents in transitions in Russia and Eastern Europe. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; admission to the Transitions Program; Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies 351; and consent of instructor.

353. Writing Seminar: Transitions in Russia and Eastern Europe.
Third in a sequence of three courses. Students produce a research paper based on readings, discussion, and research conducted in Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies 351 and 352. The paper presents the student's findings and analysis of a particular aspect of transition in Russia and Eastern Europe. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; admission to the Transitions Program; Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies 352; and consent of instructor.

379C. Conference Course.
May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of the undergraduate adviser in Russian, East European, and Eurasian studies.

679H. Honors Tutorial Course.
Intensive reading and research planned with and approved by the honors adviser, followed by completion of a thesis. Conference course for two semesters. Required of Russian, East European, and Eurasian studies majors who plan to seek special honors in Russian, East European, and Eurasian studies. Prerequisite: For 679HA, upper-division standing, admission to the Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies Honors Program, and consent of the honors adviser; for 679HB, Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies 679HA.

Related Courses

Related courses may be counted as Russian, East European, and Eurasian studies content courses for the Russian, East European, and Eurasian studies program with the written approval of the instructor indicating that a Russian, East European, and Eurasian orientation for the student's work has been arranged.

Many of the following courses may be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Only topics in Russian, East European, and Eurasian studies may be counted as related courses in the Russian, East European, and Eurasian studies program.

For a description of each of the following courses, see the chapter for the college that offers the course.

School of Architecture

Architecture 368R. Topics in the History of Architecture (Topic: Soviet Architecture of the 1920s and 1930s).

Red McCombs School of Business

International Business 350. International Trade (when approved by the director of the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies).

International Business 372. Seminar in International Business (when approved by the director of the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies).

College of Communication

Journalism 361E. International News (when approved by the director of the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies).

College of Fine Arts

Art History 302. Survey of Ancient through Medieval Art (when approved by the director of the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies).

Art History 363. Topics in Medieval Art.

Art History 366P. Topics in Modernism.

College of Liberal Arts

Anthropology 324L. Topics in Anthropology.

Czech 506. First-Year Czech I.

Czech 507. First-Year Czech II.

Czech 312K. Second-Year Czech I.

Czech 312L. Second-Year Czech II.

Czech 330. Modern Czech Literature.

Czech 379. Conference Course in Czech Language or Literature.

Czech 679H. Honors Tutorial Course.

Economics 327. Comparative Economic Systems.

Economics 346K. Russian Economic Development since 1917.

Economics 350K. Selected Topics in Economics.

Economics 357K. Marxist Economics.

Geography 326. Regions and Cultures of Europe.

Geography 327. Geography of the Former Soviet Union.

German 363K. Topics in German Culture.

Government 314. Introductory Topics in Political Science.

Government 324J. Governments and Politics of Eastern Europe.

Government 328M. Politics in Southern Europe.

Government 335M. Topics in Political Thought.

Government 336M. Governments and Politics of Russia.

Government 344. American Foreign Relations (when approved by the director of the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies).

Government 344L. Introduction to Comparative Politics (when approved by the director of the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies).

Government 360N. Topics in International Relations (when approved by the director of the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies).

Government 365N. Topics in Comparative Politics (when approved by the director of the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies).

History 343L. History of Russia to 1917.

History 343M. History of Russia/the Soviet Union from 1917.

History 350L. Undergraduate Seminar in History (when approved by the director of the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies).

History 366N. Topics in History (when approved by the director of the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies).

Humanities 350. Topics in the Humanities (when approved by the director of the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies).

Linguistics 322. Gypsy Language and Culture.

Philosophy 334K. Modern Thinkers (when approved by the director of the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies).

Philosophy 360K. Marxist Philosophy.

Philosophy 371H. Philosophy Honors (when approved by the director of the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies).

Polish 506. First-Year Polish I.

Polish 507. First-Year Polish II.

Polish 312K. Second-Year Polish I.

Polish 312L. Second-Year Polish II.

Polish 379. Conference Course in Polish Language or Literature.

Russian 804. Accelerated First-Year Russian.

Russian 505S. Intensive First-Year Russian I.

Russian 506. First-Year Russian I.

Russian 506T. First-Year Russian for Special Purposes I.

Russian 507. First-Year Russian II.

Russian 507T. First-Year Russian for Special Purposes II.

Russian 612. Accelerated Second-Year Russian.

Russian 412K. Second-Year Russian I.

Russian 412L. Second-Year Russian II.

Russian 312M. Second-Year Russian I--Technical.

Russian 515S. Intensive Second-Year Russian I.

Russian 324. Advanced Russian I.

Russian 325. Advanced Russian II.

Russian 525S. Intensive Third-Year Russian I.

Russian 326. Topics in Advanced Russian.

Russian 330. Topics in Russian Culture.

Russian 356. Russian Literature in Translation.

Russian 360. Study of an Individual Writer.

Russian 369. Topics in Russian Linguistics.

Russian 379. Conference Course in Russian Language or Literature.

Russian 679H. Honors Tutorial Course.

Serbian/Croatian 506. First-Year Serbian/Croatian I.

Serbian/Croatian 507. First-Year Serbian/Croatian II.

Serbian/Croatian 312K. Second-Year Serbian/Croatian I.

Serbian/Croatian 312L. Second-Year Serbian/Croatian II.

Serbian/Croatian 379. Conference Course in Serbian/Croatian.

Slavic 320. Literature and Nationalism in the Balkans.

Slavic 321. The Jewish Experience in Eastern Europe.

Slavic 324. Seminar on Slavic and East European Studies.

Sociology 321K. Contemporary Issues in Sociology: Special Topics.

Yiddish 604. Accelerated First-Year Yiddish.

Science, Technology, and Society

Unless otherwise stated below, each course meets for three lecture hours a week for one semester.

Science, Technology, and Society: STS

Lower-Division Courses

311. Topics in Science, Technology, and Society.
Science, Technology, and Society 311 and Technology, Literacy, and Culture 311 may not both be counted unless the topics vary. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

319. Information Technology and Social Life.
The impact of technologies on social life, and the necessity for applying skills developed in the liberal arts to managing new ways of life mediated through technologies, including work and home environments. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester.

Upper-Division Courses

321. Introduction to Science, Technology, and Society.
Introduction to the history of communication technology, including how past innovations shaped societies and how current changes are transforming human cultures, universities, and the liberal arts. Science, Technology, and Society 321 and Technology, Literacy, and Culture 321 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Completion of at least thirty semester hours of coursework.

331. Topics in Science, Technology, and Society.
Science, Technology, and Society 331 and Technology, Literacy, and Culture 331 may not both be counted unless the topics vary. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

360. Senior Seminar in Science, Technology, and Society.
Senior capstone seminar. Allows the student to integrate the knowledge he or she has gained in the major field of study with that provided by the concentration in science, technology, and society. Science, Technology, and Society 360 and Technology, Literacy, and Culture 360 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Completion of at least ninety semester hours of coursework, including Science, Technology, and Society 321 (or Technology, Literacy, and Culture 321).

367. Conference Course in Science, Technology, and Society.
Supervised work on specific projects in science, technology, and society. Three conference hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Completion of at least thirty-six semester hours of coursework and approval of written application by the supervising instructor.

370. Research Internship.
Supervised fieldwork in a business or community setting related to the student's career and research interests. Approximately six to ten hours of work a week for one semester, to be arranged with faculty member and internship sponsor. May be repeated for credit, but no more than six semester hours of Science, Technology, and Society 370 (or Technology, Literacy, and Culture 370) may be counted toward the concentration requirement. Prerequisite: Science, Technology, and Society 321 (or Technology, Literacy, and Culture 321), upper-division standing, and consent of instructor.

 


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Undergraduate Catalog
Contents
Chapter 1 - The University
Chapter 2 - School of Architecture
Chapter 3 - Red McCombs School of Business
Chapter 4 - College of Communication
Chapter 5 - College of Education
Chapter 6 - College of Engineering
Chapter 7 - College of Fine Arts
Chapter 8 - School of Information
Chapter 9 - College of Liberal Arts
Chapter 10 - College of Natural Sciences
Chapter 11 - School of Nursing
Chapter 12 - College of Pharmacy
Chapter 13 - School of Social Work
Chapter 14 - The Faculty
Texas Common Course Numbering System (Appendix A)
Appendix B - Degree and Course Abbreviations

Related Information
Catalogs
Course Schedules
Academic Calendars
Office of Admissions


Office of the Registrar
University of Texas at Austin

17 August 2004. Registrar's Web Team

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