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Undergrad 04-06

CONTENTS

CHAPTER 1
The University

CHAPTER 2
School of Architecture

CHAPTER 3
Red McCombs
School of Business

CHAPTER 4
College of Communication

CHAPTER 5
College of Education

CHAPTER 6
College of Engineering

CHAPTER 7
College of Fine Arts

CHAPTER 8
School of Information

CHAPTER 9
College of Liberal Arts

CHAPTER 10
College of
Natural Sciences

CHAPTER 11
School of Nursing

CHAPTER 12
College of Pharmacy

CHAPTER 13
School of Social Work

CHAPTER 14
The Faculty

Texas Common Course Numbering System
(Appendix A)

APPENDIX B
Degree and Course Abbreviations

 

    

10. College of Natural Sciences

--continued

 

Bachelor of Science in Geosystems Engineering and Hydrogeology

Geosystems engineers and hydrogeologists are concerned with the development and use of engineering approaches in the management of natural resources from the earth's surface and subsurface, environmental restoration of subsurface sites, and other processes related to the earth sciences. This degree program, offered jointly by the College of Engineering and the College of Natural Sciences, is designed to teach students the geological and engineering principles needed to solve subsurface resource development and environmental problems. The curriculum includes a fundamental sequence of engineering and geological sciences courses in such areas as multiphase fluid flow, physical and chemical hydrology, heat and mass transfer, field methods, and engineering design. This interdisciplinary systems approach, combining engineering and geological sciences, is increasingly required to address complex real-world problems such as characterization and remediation of aquifers. The degree program is designed to prepare graduates for employment with environmental, water resource management, and energy companies in addition to many government agencies. Better-qualified graduates of the program may pursue graduate study in subsurface environmental engineering, petroleum engineering, geology, and other related fields.

The objective of the degree program is to prepare graduates for successful careers in subsurface environmental engineering, oil and gas production and services, and similar fields. Graduates are expected to understand the fundamental principles of science and engineering behind the technology of geosystems engineering and hydrogeology so that their education will not become outdated and so that they will be capable of self-instruction after graduation. They should also be prepared to serve society by applying the ideals of ethical behavior, professionalism, and environmentally responsible stewardship of natural resources.

Containing the following elements, the technical curriculum provides both breadth and depth in a range of topics.

  • A combination of college-level mathematics and basic sciences (some with experimental work) that includes mathematics through differential equations, probability and statistics, physics, chemistry, and geology.
  • Basic engineering and geologic topics that develop a working knowledge of fluid mechanics, strength of materials, transport phenomena, material properties, phase behavior, and thermodynamics.
  • Engineering and geosciences topics that develop competence in characterization and evaluation of subsurface geological formations and their resources using geoscientific and engineering methods, including field methods; design and analysis of systems for producing, injecting, and handling fluids; application of hydrogeologic and reservoir engineering principles and practices for water and energy resource development and management; contamination evaluation and remediation methods for hydrologic resources; and use of project economics and resource valuation methods for design and decision making under conditions of risk and uncertainty.
  • A major capstone design experience that prepares students for engineering and hydrogeologic practice, based on the knowledge and skills acquired in earlier coursework and incorporating engineering and geological standards and realistic constraints.
  • A general education component that complements the technical content of the curriculum.

Curriculum

Course requirements are divided into three categories: basic sequence courses, major sequence courses, and other required courses. Enrollment in major sequence courses is restricted to students who have received credit for all of the basic sequence courses and have been admitted to the major sequence by the College of Engineering Admissions Committee. (Requirements for admission to a major sequence are given in chapter 6.) Enrollment in other required courses is not restricted by completion of the basic sequence.

Courses used to fulfill technical and nontechnical elective requirements must be approved by the petroleum and geosystems engineering faculty and the geological sciences faculty before the student enrolls in them. Courses that fulfill the social science and fine arts/humanities requirements are listed in chapter 6.

Students must fulfill the foreign language requirement in chapter 6. They must also remove any admission deficiencies in mathematics as described in General Information.

CoursesSemester Hours

Basic Sequence Courses
Chemistry 301, 302, Engineering Mechanics 306, 319, Geological Sciences 312K, 416K, 416M, 420K, Mathematics 408C, 408D, 427K, Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 310, 312, 333T, Physics 303K, 303L, 103M, 103N, Rhetoric and Composition 30659

Major Sequence Courses
Civil Engineering 357, English 316K, Geological Sciences 428, 468K, 476K, 376L, 376S, Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 322K, 323, 424, 326, 331, 365, 368, 373K, 373L 52

Other Required Courses
American government, including Texas government6
American history6
Approved fine arts or humanities elective3
Approved social science elective3

Minimum Required129

Suggested Arrangement of Courses

First Year -- Fall Semester

CoursesSemester Hours

CH 301, Principles of Chemistry I3
GEO 312K, Geology of Engineering 3
M 408C, Differential and Integral Calculus4
RHE 306, Rhetoric and Composition3
Approved social science elective 3
Total16

First Year -- Spring Semester

CoursesSemester Hours

CH 302, Principles of Chemistry II3
GEO 416M, Sedimentary Rocks4
M 408D, Sequences, Series, and Multivariable Calculus 4
PHY 303K, Engineering Physics I 3
PHY 103M, Laboratory for Physics 303K 1
American government 3
 Total 18

Second Year -- Fall Semester

Courses Semester Hours

E M 306, Statics 3
GEO 416K, Earth Materials 4
M 427K, Advanced Calculus for Applications I 4
PGE 310, Formulation and Solution of Geosystems Engineering Problems 3
American history 3
 Total 17

Second Year -- Spring Semester

Courses Semester Hours

E M 319, Mechanics of Solids 3
GEO 420K, Introduction to Field and Stratigraphic Methods 4
PGE 312, Physical and Chemical Behavior of Fluids I 3
PGE 333T, Engineering Communication 3
PHY 303L, Engineering Physics II 3
PHY 103N, Laboratory for Physics 303L 1
 Total 17

Third Year -- Fall Semester

Courses Semester Hours

GEO 476K, Groundwater Hydrology 4
PGE 322K, Transport Phenomena in Geosystems 3
PGE 424, Petrophysics 4
PGE 326, Thermodynamics and Phase Behavior3
American history 3
 Total 17

Third Year -- Spring Semester

Courses Semester Hours

C E 357, Geotechnical Engineering 3
E 316K, Masterworks of Literature 3
PGE 323, Fluid Flow through Permeable Media 3
PGE 365, Resource Economics and Valuation 3
American government 3
 Total 15

Third Year -- Summer Session

Courses Semester Hours

GEO 376L, Field Methods in Groundwater Hydrology 3
 Total 3

Fourth Year -- Fall Semester

Courses Semester Hours

GEO 428, Structural Geology 4
GEO 376S, Physical Hydrology 3
PGE 331, Fundamentals of Reservoir Engineering 3
PGE 368, Fundamentals of Well Logging 3
PGE 373K, Geosystems Engineering Design and Analysis I 3
 Total 16

Fourth Year -- Spring Semester

Courses Semester Hours

GEO 468K, Geophysics for Geological Sciences Majors 4
GEO 476M, Chemical Hydrogeology 4
PGE 370, Fundamentals of Subsurface Environmental Engineering 3
PGE 373L, Geosystems Engineering Design and Analysis II 3
Approved fine arts/humanities elective 3
 Total 17

Bachelor of Science in Human Development and Family Sciences

This degree program is designed to provide both a knowledge base and practical experience in working with children and families in a variety of settings.

Career opportunities are varied, depending on selection of electives and supplemental experiences, and include teaching in private preschool programs, positions in local, state, and federal agencies concerned with children and families, and positions in hospitals with a children's unit. The curriculum also provides a foundation for graduate study in such fields as human development, family studies, psychology, social work, sociology, special education, and early childhood education. Such advanced work offers preparation for college teaching, research, and work in public and private agencies serving children, families, and adults. With the selection of appropriate electives, the program can also provide preparation for advanced training in health-related professions such as medicine, nursing, and physical or occupational therapy; information about these areas is available from the Health Professions Office.

Students seeking the Bachelor of Science in Human Development and Family Sciences must choose one of five options: option I, early childhood; option II, human development; option III, families and personal relationships; option IV, families and society; and option V, general human development and family sciences. Option V is limited to students with an in-residence University grade point average of at least 3.00 and consent of the undergraduate adviser.

Prescribed Work Common to All Options

  1. Rhetoric and Composition 306 and English 316K. In addition, in taking courses to fulfill other degree requirements, the student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component; one of these courses must be upper-division. If the writing requirement is not fulfilled by courses specified for the degree, the student must fulfill it either with electives or with coursework taken in addition to the number of hours required for the degree. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.
  2. Students who enter the University with fewer than two high school units in a single foreign language must take the first two semesters in a language without degree credit to remove their language deficiency.
  3. Six semester hours of American government, including Texas government; six semester hours of American history; Psychology 301; and six semester hours, at least three of which must be upper-division, chosen from courses in economics, social or cultural anthropology, and psychology. Neither Psychology 304 nor 333D may be counted toward this degree.
  4. Educational Psychology 371 and three semester hours of mathematics other than Mathematics 301, 302, 316K, and 316L. Algebra courses at the level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics 301 without degree credit to remove their deficiency.
  5. Six semester hours of coursework in biology and/or chemistry; and six additional hours chosen from the following fields: astronomy, biology, chemistry, computer sciences, geological sciences, mathematics, nutrition, and physics. Courses designed for nonscience majors may not be counted toward this requirement; students should consult the Department of Human Ecology for a list of courses that may be counted.
  6. Three semester hours in architecture, art (including art history, design, studio art, visual art studies), classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts, music (including music, instruments, ensemble), philosophy (excluding courses in logic), or theatre and dance.
  7. Nine semester hours from an approved list of supporting courses available from the Department of Human Ecology. Students should confer with their advisers about courses appropriate to their career goals.
  8. Thirty-one semester hours in the Department of Human Ecology, consisting of Nutrition 311; Human Development and Family Sciences 304, 312, 313, 113L, 333L, and 360; six hours chosen from Human Development and Family Sciences 352, 652F, 352L, 652P, and 355; and six additional hours of coursework in human development and family sciences.
  9. At least thirty-six semester hours of upper-division coursework.
  10. Eighteen semester hours in the Department of Human Ecology must be completed in residence at the University.
  11. Enough additional coursework to make a total of 126 semester hours.

Additional Prescribed Work for Each Option

Option I: Early Childhood

This option is designed to provide the necessary foundation for further study or a career in working with children in applied settings.

  1. Nine semester hours chosen from Human Development and Family Sciences 338, 339, 351, 366, 378K (Topic 6: Introduction to Early Childhood Intervention), and 378L.

Option II: Human Development

This option involves the study of development across the lifespan.

  1. Nine semester hours chosen from Human Development and Family Sciences 335, 345, 351, 371, 372K, and 378L.

Option III: Families and Personal Relationships

This option involves the study of the formation and maintenance of close relationships, especially couple and family relationships.

  1. Nine semester hours chosen from Human Development and Family Sciences 322, 337, 345, 347, 358, and 372K.

Option IV: Families and Society

This option involves the study of the family and its interactions with larger socioeconomic systems, such as the economy, work and school, the media, public policy, and government.

  1. Nine semester hours chosen from Human Development and Family Sciences 322, 339, 347, 354, 375, 378K (Topic 5: Media and the Family), and 378K (Topic 6: Introduction to Early Childhood Intervention).

Option V: General Human Development and Family Sciences

This option allows the student to individualize the degree plan to match his or her career goals. Option V is limited to students with an in-residence University grade point average of at least 3.00 and consent of the undergraduate adviser.

  1. Nine semester hours in human development and family sciences.

Special Requirements

The student must fulfill the University-wide graduation requirements given in chapter 1 and the college requirements given in this chapter. He or she must also make a grade of at least C in each course used to fulfill requirements 7, 8 and 12 of the prescribed work above.

Bachelor of Science in Interdisciplinary Science

Prescribed Work Common to Both Options

  1. Rhetoric and Composition 306 and English 316K. In addition, in taking courses to fulfill other degree requirements, the student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component; one of these courses must be upper-division. If the writing requirement is not fulfilled by courses specified for the degree, the student must fulfill it either with electives or with coursework taken in addition to the number of hours required for the degree. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.
  2. Students who enter the University with fewer than two high school units in a single foreign language must take the first two semesters in a language without degree credit to remove their language deficiency.
  3. Six semester hours of American government, including Texas government.
  4. Six semester hours of American history.
  5. History 329U or Philosophy 329U.
  6. Eighteen semester hours of professional development coursework: Curriculum and Instruction 650S, UTeach-Natural Sciences 101, 110, 350, 355, 360, 170.

Additional Prescribed Work for Each Option

Option I: Middle Grades Teaching in Mathematics and Science

This option is designed to fulfill the course requirements for certification in Texas as a middle grades teacher in the composite teaching field of mathematics/science. However, completion of the course requirements does not guarantee the student's certification. For information about additional certification requirements, consult the UTeach-Natural Sciences academic adviser.

  1. Curriculum and Instruction 371 (Topic 10: Secondary School Reading in the Content Subjects).
  2. Educational Psychology 363M (topic 3: Adolescent Development), or Psychology 301 and 304.
  3. The following foundation courses:
    1. Mathematics 408C, 408D, 315C, 316L or 362K, 326K, and 333L.
    2. Chemistry 301, 302, and 204.
    3. Physics 302K, 102M, 302L, and 102N, or an equivalent sequence. Students who choose the physics concentration must take Physics 301, 101L, 316, and 116L.
    4. Computer Sciences 303E or the equivalent.
    5. Biology 211, 212, 213, 214, and 205L, 206L, or 208L.
    6. Three semester hours of coursework in geological sciences.
    7. Three semester hours of coursework in astronomy or marine science.
    8. Biology 337 (Topic: Research Methods--UTeach), Chemistry 368 (Topic: Research Methods--UTeach), or Physics 341 (Topic: Research Methods--UTeach).
  4. One of the following concentrations:
    1. Twelve hours of approved coursework in mathematics, including Mathematics 358K. Mathematics 325K, 341 or 340L, and 360M are recommended.
    2. Twelve hours of approved coursework beyond the foundation courses listed above in any one of the following areas: chemistry, biology, physics, or geological sciences.
  5. Enough additional coursework to make a total of at least 126 semester hours.

Special Requirements

The student must fulfill the University-wide graduation requirements given in chapter 1 and the college requirements given in this chapter. He or she must also make a grade of at least C in all courses used to fulfill requirements 9 and 10 of the prescribed work above.

To graduate and be recommended for certification, students must have a University grade point average of at least 2.50. They must earn a grade of at least C in the professional development courses listed in requirements 6, 7, and 8 and must pass the final teaching portfolio review. For information about the portfolio review and additional teacher certification requirements, consult the UTeach-Natural Sciences academic adviser.

Option II: Secondary School Teaching in Computer Sciences and Mathematics

This option is designed to fulfill the course requirements for certification as a secondary school teacher in Texas, but completion of the course requirements does not guarantee the student's certification. For information about additional certification requirements, consult the UTeach-Natural Sciences academic adviser.

  1. Three semester hours in anthropology, economics, geography, linguistics, psychology, or sociology.
  2. Three semester hours in architecture, art (including art history, design, studio art, visual art studies), classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts, music (including music, instruments, ensemble), philosophy (excluding courses in logic), or theatre and dance.
  3. The following foundation courses:
    1. Mathematics 408C, 408D, 315C, Mathematics 325K or Philosophy 313K, Mathematics 333L, 326K or 360M, 341 or 340L, 358K, and 362K.
    2. Computer Sciences 303E or 305J, 307, 310, 315, 326E or 356, 327E or 347, and 349.
    3. Six additional hours in computer sciences chosen from Computer Sciences 323E, 324E or 354, 336, 337, 345, 352, and 372.
    4. Physics 303K, 103M, 303L, and 103N; or 317K, 317L, 117M, and 117N.
    5. Management Information Systems 311F.
    6. Information Studies 312.
    7. Biology 337 (Topic: Research Methods--UTeach), Chemistry 368 (Topic: Research Methods--UTeach), or Physics 341 (Topic: Research Methods--UTeach).
  4. Enough additional coursework to make a total of at least 126 semester hours.

Special Requirements

The student must fulfill the University-wide graduation requirements given in chapter 1 and the college requirements given in this chapter. He or she must also make a grade of at least C in all courses used to fulfill requirements 5, 6, and 9 of the prescribed work above.

To graduate and be recommended for certification, students must have a University grade point average of at least 2.50. They must earn a grade of at least C in the professional development courses listed in requirements 5 and 6 and must pass the final teaching portfolio review. For information about the portfolio review and additional teacher certification requirements, consult the UTeach-Natural Sciences academic adviser.

 


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Undergraduate Catalog
Contents
Chapter 1 - The University
Chapter 2 - School of Architecture
Chapter 3 - Red McCombs School of Business
Chapter 4 - College of Communication
Chapter 5 - College of Education
Chapter 6 - College of Engineering
Chapter 7 - College of Fine Arts
Chapter 8 - School of Information
Chapter 9 - College of Liberal Arts
Chapter 10 - College of Natural Sciences
Chapter 11 - School of Nursing
Chapter 12 - College of Pharmacy
Chapter 13 - School of Social Work
Chapter 14 - The Faculty
Texas Common Course Numbering System (Appendix A)
Appendix B - Degree and Course Abbreviations

Related Information
Catalogs
Course Schedules
Academic Calendars
Office of Admissions


Office of the Registrar
University of Texas at Austin

17 August 2004. Registrar's Web Team

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