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Undergrad 04-06

CONTENTS

CHAPTER 1
The University

CHAPTER 2
School of Architecture

CHAPTER 3
Red McCombs
School of Business

CHAPTER 4
College of Communication

CHAPTER 5
College of Education

CHAPTER 6
College of Engineering

CHAPTER 7
College of Fine Arts

CHAPTER 8
School of Information

CHAPTER 9
College of Liberal Arts

CHAPTER 10
College of
Natural Sciences

CHAPTER 11
School of Nursing

CHAPTER 12
College of Pharmacy

CHAPTER 13
School of Social Work

CHAPTER 14
The Faculty

Texas Common Course Numbering System
(Appendix A)

APPENDIX B
Degree and Course Abbreviations

 

    

10. College of Natural Sciences

--continued

 

Courses

The faculty has approval to offer the following courses in the academic years 2004-2005 and 2005-2006; however, not all courses are taught each semester or summer session. Students should consult the Course Schedule to determine which courses and topics will be offered during a particular semester or summer session. The Course Schedule may also reflect changes made to the course inventory after the publication of this catalog.

A full explanation of course numbers is given in General Information. In brief, the first digit of a course number indicates the semester hour value of the course. The second and third digits indicate the rank of the course: if they are 01 through 19, the course is of lower-division rank; if 20 through 79, of upper-division rank; if 80 through 99, of graduate rank.

Natural Sciences

Natural Sciences: NSC

Lower-Division Courses

001. Freshman Interest Group Seminar.
Restricted to students in the Freshman Interest Group Program. Basic issues in various natural sciences disciplines. One lecture hour a week for one semester.

301C. Freshman Seminar.
Restricted to first-semester freshmen. Small-group seminar involving reading, discussion, writing, and oral reports. Introduction to University resources, including libraries, computer and research facilities, and museums. Several sections are offered each semester, with various topics and instructors. Two lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester.

302. Texas Interdisciplinary Plan: Critical Thinking Seminar.
Restricted to students in the Texas Interdisciplinary Plan or in the Gateway Program. An examination of fundamental concepts in critical thinking, including the role of intellectual virtues, an analysis of the elements of thought, Socratic thinking, and the application of universal intellectual standards. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, with additional hours to be arranged. Liberal Arts 302 and Natural Sciences 302 may not both be counted. May not be repeated for credit.

109, 209, 309. Topics in Natural Sciences.
For each semester hour of credit earned, one lecture hour a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

110. Dean's Scholars Seminar.
Restricted to students in the Dean's Scholars Program. Emphasis on student participation. Format may include student speakers, outside speakers, discussions, visits to laboratories, or other projects. The equivalent of one lecture hour a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit. Offered on the pass/fail basis only.

115. Women in Natural Sciences Seminar.
The work and lives of women scientists in a sociocultural context. One lecture hour a week for one semester.

118C, 218C, 318C. Forum Seminar Series.
Restricted to freshmen and sophomores. Lectures and discussions on various contemporary issues. Emphasis on multidisciplinary perspectives and critical discourse. For 118C, two lecture hours a week for eight weeks; for 218C, two lecture hours a week for one semester; for 318C, three lecture hours a week for one semester, or two lecture hours and one hour of supervised research a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Upper-Division Course

371. Texas Interdisciplinary Plan Seminar.
Restricted to students in the Texas Interdisciplinary Plan. An analysis of interdisciplinary themes within the arts and sciences through reading, research, discussion, and writing. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, with additional hours to be arranged. Liberal Arts 371 and Natural Sciences 371 may not both be counted. May not be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and consent of the Texas Interdisciplinary Plan adviser.

Department of Astronomy

Unless otherwise stated below, each course meets for three lecture hours a week for one semester.

Astronomy: AST

Lower-Division Courses

301. Introduction to Astronomy.
General introduction to astronomy for nonscience majors. The solar system, stars, galaxies, and cosmology. Only one of the following may be counted: Astronomy 301, 302, 303, 307.

101L. Astronomy Discovery Laboratory.
For nonscience majors. Hands-on projects in observational astronomy and related laboratory disciplines. Students work in small groups. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. May not be counted by students with credit for Astronomy 103L. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Astronomy 301.

302. Self-Paced Introduction to Astronomy.
General, self-paced introduction to astronomy for nonscience majors. The solar system, stars, galaxies, and cosmology. Only one of the following may be counted: Astronomy 301, 302, 303, 307.

303. Introduction to Astronomy with Celestial Observations.
General introduction to astronomy for nonscience majors. The solar system, stars, galaxies, and cosmology. Introduces students to the night sky and includes some observational activities. Only one of the following may be counted: Astronomy 301, 302, 303, 307.

103L. Astronomical Observations.
For nonscience majors. Observations of the night sky with the naked eye and small telescopes; indoor laboratory activities. Two laboratory hours a week for one semester. May not be counted by students with credit for Astronomy 101L, 302, or 303. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Astronomy 301 or 307.

104. Undergraduate Astronomy Seminar.
Designed for astronomy majors. Discussions about current astronomical research, with different topics emphasized each semester. One lecture hour a week for one semester. May be repeated twice for credit when the topics vary. Offered on the pass/fail basis only.

307. Introductory Astronomy.
Introduction to astronomy for science and engineering students. The solar system, stars, galaxies, and cosmology. Only one of the following may be counted: Astronomy 301, 302, 303, 307. Prerequisite: Mathematics 305G or the equivalent or consent of instructor; high school trigonometry and physics are recommended.

309. Topics in Astronomy for Nonscience Students.
Selected topics in modern astronomy: solar system, galaxies, peculiar stars, cosmology, and others. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Astronomy 301, 302, 303, or consent of instructor.

309L. Search for Extraterrestrial Life.
For nonscience majors. Origin of life in the solar system, existence of other planetary systems, possibilities and techniques for detection of and communication with other intelligences. Prerequisite: Astronomy 301, 302, 303, or consent of instructor.

309N. Lives and Deaths of Stars.
For nonscience majors. How stars live and die; extremes of stars and their life cycles. Exotic objects such as white dwarfs, supernovae, neutron stars, pulsars, and black holes. Specific topics may vary with instructor. Astronomy 309N and 309Q may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Astronomy 301, 302, 303, or consent of instructor.

309P. Astronomy in Science Fiction.
The use of astronomy and other sciences in science fiction literature. Critical analysis of selected novels as to the validity of the astronomy used. Prerequisite: Astronomy 301, 302, 303, or consent of instructor.

309Q. Time and the Cosmos.
For nonscience majors. From the beginning of time in the Big Bang to the end of time in the black hole. Includes the early universe, the formation and evolution of single and double stars, and the supercompact objects they eventually become: white dwarfs, pulsars, and black holes. Astronomy 309N and 309Q may not both be counted; Astronomy 309Q and 309R may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Astronomy 301, 302, 303, or consent of instructor.

309R. Galaxies, Quasars, and the Universe.
For nonscience majors. Galaxies, quasars, giant black holes; cosmic evolution; the origin and future of the universe. Astronomy 309Q and 309R may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Astronomy 301, 302, 303, or consent of instructor.

309T. The Milky Way Galaxy.
Our spiral system of stars, gas, and dust; star formation. Prerequisite: Astronomy 301, 302, 303, or consent of instructor.

110K, 210K, 310K. Conference Course.
Supervised study of selected areas of astronomy, by arrangement with a faculty member. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Some sections are offered on the pass/fail basis only; these are identified in the Course Schedule. Prerequisite: Written consent of instructor.

119S, 219S, 319S, 419S, 519S, 619S, 719S, 819S, 919S. Topics in Astronomy.
This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Center for Global Educational Opportunities. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Astronomy. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Upper-Division Courses

321. Current Problems in Astronomy.
For nonscience majors. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; and Astronomy 301, 302, 303, or consent of instructor.

324. Origins: The Universe, Stars, Planets, and Life.
For nonscience majors. Cosmic origins from the Big Bang to life, and the connections among the origins of stars, planets, and life. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; and Astronomy 301, 302, 303, or consent of instructor.

129S, 229S, 329S, 429S, 529S, 629S, 729S, 829S, 929S. Topics in Astronomy.
This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Center for Global Educational Opportunities. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Astronomy. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

350L. History and Philosophy of Astronomy.
Historical influence of astronomical concepts on social, economic, literary, and scientific life; the place of astronomy in society. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; and Astronomy 301, 302, 303, or consent of instructor.

351. Astronomical Instrumentation.
A hands-on course in computer-controlled optical instrumentation. Intended for natural science and engineering students interested in the practical aspects of instrument design and construction. Includes optics and optical design, electronics, machining and mechanical design, and computer interfacing. Students work in groups and as teams to design a computer-controlled optical instrument. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing in the College of Natural Sciences or the College of Engineering, or consent of instructor.

352K. Stellar Astronomy.
Properties of stars and starlight: principles of radiation; interpretation of stellar spectra. Observational techniques such as photometry, spectroscopy, and telescopes and detectors; variable stars; binary stars. Prerequisite: Physics 316 and 116L.

352L. Positional, Dynamical, and Kinematical Astronomy.
Coordinate systems and time; stellar positions and motions; the kinematics and dynamics of star clusters and galaxies. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Mathematics 427K.

152M. Stellar Astronomy Laboratory.
An introduction to practical observational techniques in astronomy, designed for astronomy majors or advanced students in a physical science. Exercises on the spectroscopy, photometry, and positions of stars using a sixteen-inch telescope on campus. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. With consent of instructor, may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Physics 316 and 116L; credit or registration for Astronomy 352K is recommended.

353. Astrophysics.
Survey of the physics of stellar and nonstellar radiation laws, stellar atmospheres and interiors; high-energy astrophysics. Prerequisite: Physics 316 and 116L.

358. Galaxies and the Universe.
Our galaxy and its constituents; stars and interstellar matter. Properties of other galaxies; galaxy interactions and mergers; expansion and evolution of the universe. Prerequisite: Physics 316 or the equivalent; Astronomy 352K or 307 is recommended.

364. Solar System Astronomy.
Modern studies of the solar system, including properties of the planets and smaller bodies, and the origin of planetary systems. Prerequisite: Physics 316 and 116L.

367M. Methods of Astronomy.
Same as Physical Science 367M. An introductory, self-paced course in the methods of astronomy that emphasizes learning astronomical principles through observations. Six laboratory hours a week for one semester. May not be counted toward the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I, degree with a major in astronomy. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and nine semester hours of coursework in mathematics and/or science, including one of the following: Physical Science 303, 304, Astronomy 301, 302, 303. Equivalent preparation in mathematics, physics, chemistry, or earth sciences may be substituted with written approval of the instructor.

175, 275, 375. Conference Course.
May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and consent of instructor.

376. Special Topics in Advanced Astronomy.
Designed for science majors. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Up to six semester hours may be counted toward the major requirement for the Bachelor of Arts with a major in astronomy. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and consent of instructor.

379H. Honors Tutorial Course.
Research project and thesis for students electing to take the honors program in astronomy. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: An academic record that may qualify the student for admission to the Astronomy Honors Program, and consent of instructor and the honors adviser.

 


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Undergraduate Catalog
Contents
Chapter 1 - The University
Chapter 2 - School of Architecture
Chapter 3 - Red McCombs School of Business
Chapter 4 - College of Communication
Chapter 5 - College of Education
Chapter 6 - College of Engineering
Chapter 7 - College of Fine Arts
Chapter 8 - School of Information
Chapter 9 - College of Liberal Arts
Chapter 10 - College of Natural Sciences
Chapter 11 - School of Nursing
Chapter 12 - College of Pharmacy
Chapter 13 - School of Social Work
Chapter 14 - The Faculty
Texas Common Course Numbering System (Appendix A)
Appendix B - Degree and Course Abbreviations

Related Information
Catalogs
Course Schedules
Academic Calendars
Office of Admissions


Office of the Registrar
University of Texas at Austin

17 August 2004. Registrar's Web Team

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