skip to content
UT Austin
photo
Undergrad 04-06

CONTENTS

CHAPTER 1
The University

CHAPTER 2
School of Architecture

CHAPTER 3
Red McCombs
School of Business

CHAPTER 4
College of Communication

CHAPTER 5
College of Education

CHAPTER 6
College of Engineering

CHAPTER 7
College of Fine Arts

CHAPTER 8
School of Information

CHAPTER 9
College of Liberal Arts

CHAPTER 10
College of
Natural Sciences

CHAPTER 11
School of Nursing

CHAPTER 12
College of Pharmacy

CHAPTER 13
School of Social Work

CHAPTER 14
The Faculty

Texas Common Course Numbering System
(Appendix A)

APPENDIX B
Degree and Course Abbreviations

 

    

10. College of Natural Sciences

Courses

--continued

 

The faculty has approval to offer the following courses in the academic years 2004-2005 and 2005-2006; however, not all courses are taught each semester or summer session. Students should consult the Course Schedule to determine which courses and topics will be offered during a particular semester or summer session. The Course Schedule may also reflect changes made to the course inventory after the publication of this catalog.

A full explanation of course numbers is given in General Information. In brief, the first digit of a course number indicates the semester hour value of the course. The second and third digits indicate the rank of the course: if they are 01 through 19, the course is of lower-division rank; if 20 through 79, of upper-division rank; if 80 through 99, of graduate rank.

Department of Human Ecology

Unless otherwise stated below, each course meets for three lecture hours a week for one semester.

Human Development and Family Sciences: HDF

Lower-Division Courses

304. Family Relationships.
Same as Women's and Gender Studies 301 (Topic 4: Family Relationships). The process of family interaction over the life cycle. Application of research findings to the understanding of relationships. Only one of the following may be counted: Child Development 304, Human Development and Family Sciences 304, Women's Studies 301 (Topic 4: Family Relationships).

312. Family Resource Management.
Management concepts and theory in resource allocation used to meet family and life demands. Only one of the following may be counted: Human Development and Family Sciences 312, 321, Human Ecology 321. Prerequisite: Human Development and Family Sciences 304 (or Child Development 304).

313. Child Development.
Same as Women's and Gender Studies 301 (Topic 5: Child Development). Motor, language, cognitive, social, and emotional development in the family context. Only one of the following may be counted: Child Development 313, Human Development and Family Sciences 313, Women's Studies 301 (Topic 5: Child Development). Prerequisite: Psychology 301 and concurrent enrollment in Human Development and Family Sciences 113L (or credit for Child Development 113L).

113L. Child Development Laboratory.
Students observe children at the University Child and Family Laboratory and relate their observations to the issues discussed in Human Development and Family Sciences 313. One and one-half laboratory hours a week for one semester. Child Development 113L and Human Development and Family Sciences 113L may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 and concurrent enrollment in Human Development and Family Sciences 313 (or credit for Child Development 313).

315K. Field Experience I.
Fieldwork. Prerequisite: Six semester hours of coursework in human development and family sciences (or child development) and approval of written proposal by instructor and adviser.

119S, 219S, 319S, 419S, 519S, 619S, 719S, 819S, 919S. Topics in Human Development and Family Sciences.
This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Center for Global Educational Opportunities. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Human Ecology. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Upper-Division Courses

321. Principles of Resource Allocation.
Principles and methods for identification, analysis, and evaluation of economic and human resource management tools for individuals and families. Only one of the following may be counted: Human Development and Family Sciences 312, 321, Human Ecology 321. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

322. Personal and Family Finance.
Overview from the individual and family perspectives of financial planning tools, cash management, consumer credit, basic tax preparation, and insurance selection. Includes application of knowledge to hypothetical situations and case studies. Human Development and Family Sciences 322 and Human Ecology 322 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

129S, 229S, 329S, 429S, 529S, 629S, 729S, 829S, 929S. Topics in Human Development and Family Sciences.
This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Center for Global Educational Opportunities. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Human Ecology. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

333L. Research Methods in Human Development and Family Sciences.
Survey of research methods, including observational and experimental techniques. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, with variable laboratory observation hours to be arranged. Prerequisite: Human Development and Family Sciences 304, 312, 313, and 113L; and credit or registration for Psychology 418, Educational Psychology 371, or an equivalent statistics course.

335. Adult Development.
Adulthood and the development, changes, and maturation that occurs, including the impact of relationships in adulthood. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and Human Development and Family Sciences 313 and 113L.

337. Personal Relationships.
The process by which a variety of intimate relationships are formed, maintained, and dissolved, as well as gender issues in communication and conflict, sexual aspects of relationships, division of labor, and the involvement of partners with their social networks. Child Development 337 and Human Development and Family Sciences 337 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Human Development and Family Sciences 304.

338. Developmentally Appropriate Practices with Young Children.
Developmentally appropriate practices, the importance of play, arranging environments, material selection, and a basic understanding about centers and activities for young children. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, with an additional three to six hours of fieldwork sometime during the semester. Human Development and Family Sciences 338 and 348 (Topic 1: Art and Science) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; and Human Development and Family Sciences 313 and 113L, or Psychology 304.

339. Working with Children and Families.
The history, background, and various theoretical approaches of early childhood education; methods of assessments, planning for individuals and groups, and working with families and parents in various settings. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, with an additional 3 to 6 hours of fieldwork sometime during the semester. Human Development and Family Sciences 339 and 348 (Topic 2: Music and Literature) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and Human Development and Family Sciences 304, 313, and 113L.

345. Peer Relationships.
Children's peer relationships from toddlerhood to adolescence. Human Development and Family Sciences 345 and 378K (Topic: Peer Relationships) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; and Human Development and Family Sciences 313 and 113L, or Psychology 304.

347. Socioeconomic Problems of the Family.
An analysis of socioeconomic factors affecting the economic well-being of families and individuals. Human Development and Family Sciences 347 and Human Ecology 347 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and three semester hours of coursework in economics.

348. Development of the Young Child through Creative Activities.
Principles of selection and use of art, music, literature, and play equipment. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Child Development 348 and Human Development and Family Sciences 348 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Human Development and Family Sciences 313 and 113L (or Child Development 313 and 113L).

351. Infant Development and Attachment Relationships.
The development of emerging social language and cognitive capacities during infancy and toddlerhood and the development and consequences in infant-caregiver attachment security. Only one of the following may be counted: Child Development 378K (Topic: Infant Development and Attachment Relationships), Human Development and Family Sciences 351, 378K (Topic 7: Social Development and Attachment Relationships). Prerequisite: Human Development and Family Sciences 313 and 113L, or Psychology 304.

352. Field Experience: Community.
Practicum in applied settings concerning human development and family sciences. One lecture hour and ten to twelve hours of fieldwork a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: A University grade point average of at least 2.0; Human Development and Family Sciences 333L; six additional semester hours of upper-division coursework in human development and family sciences; and six semester hours of coursework from the list of approved supporting courses available from the Department of Human Ecology. Admission by application only, filed with the division of human development and family sciences, Department of Human Ecology, by May 1 for spring semester enrollment or by December 1 for fall semester enrollment.

652F. Field Experience II: Community.
Designed for students in their last semester. Practicum in settings concerning human development and family sciences. One lecture hour and at least twenty laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: A University grade point average of at least 2.0; Human Development and Family Sciences 333L and 366; twelve additional semester hours of upper-division coursework in human development and family sciences; six semester hours of coursework from the list of approved supporting courses available from the Department of Human Ecology; and consent of instructor. Admission by application only, filed with the division of human development and family sciences, Department of Human Ecology, by May 1 for spring semester enrollment or by December 1 for fall semester enrollment.

352L. Field Experience: Early Childhood.
Study of the skills necessary for planning, guiding, and interacting with young children. Students will work directly with young children in a classroom setting. One lecture hour and ten to twelve hours of fieldwork a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: A University grade point average of at least 2.0; Human Development and Family Sciences 333L; six semester hours of coursework chosen from Human Development and Family Sciences 338, 339, 366, 378L, 351, and 378K (Topic 6: Introduction to Early Childhood Intervention); six semester hours of coursework from the list of approved supporting courses available from the Department of Human Ecology; and consent of instructor. Admission by application only, filed with the division of human development and family sciences, Department of Human Ecology, by May 1 for spring semester enrollment or by December 1 for fall enrollment.

652P. Field Experience II: Practice Teaching.
Designed for students in their last semester. Study of skills necessary for planning, guiding, and interacting with young children. Students will work directly with children and families in an applied classroom setting. One lecture hour and at least twenty laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Human Development and Family Sciences 333L and 366; twelve additional semester hours of upper-division coursework in human development and family sciences; nine semester hours of coursework chosen from the list of approved supporting courses available from the Department of Human Ecology; and consent of instructor. Admission by application only, filed with the division of human development and family sciences, Department of Human Ecology, by May 1 for spring semester enrollment or by December 1 for fall semester enrollment.

354. Advanced Personal Financial Planning.
Overview from the individual and family perspectives of financial planning and decision-making with regard to home ownership, tax planning, investment alternatives, retirement planning, and estate transfer. Includes application of knowledge to hypothetical situations and case studies. Human Development and Family Sciences 354 and Human Ecology 354 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Human Development and Family Sciences 322 (or Human Ecology 322) with a grade of at least C.

355. Problems Course: Research Practicum.
Intensive study of selected problems of a transdisciplinary nature. One lecture hour and nine research hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: For human development and family sciences majors, a University grade point average of at least 2.0, Human Development and Family Sciences 333L, six additional semester hours of upper-division coursework in human development and family sciences, six semester hours chosen from the approved list of supporting courses from the Department of Human Ecology, and consent of instructor. Admission by application only, filed with the division of human development and family sciences, Department of Human Ecology, by May 1 for spring semester enrollment or by December 1 for fall semester enrollment. For nonmajors, a University grade point average of at least 2.0. Admission by application only, filed with the division of human development and family sciences, Department of Human Ecology, by May 1 for spring semester enrollment or by December 1 for fall semester enrollment. The application process may be waived with consent of instructor. Additional prerequisites vary with the topic and are given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: Research in Human Development and Family Sciences.

358. Parent-Child Relationships.
The determinants of parenting attitudes and behavior and the effects on children of variations in sensitivity, discipline, and other aspects of parenting. Human Development and Family Sciences 358 and 378K (Topic 2: Parent-Child Relationships) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Human Development and Family Sciences 313 and 113L, or Psychology 304.

359H. Honors Reading Course.
Supervised individual reading on special subjects. Child Development 359H and Human Development and Family Sciences 359H may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, a University grade point average of at least 3.00, and consent of the undergraduate adviser.

360. Methods of Family Life Education.
An examination, integrating theory and applied knowledge, of the best practices for working with families. Child Development 260 and Human Development and Family Sciences 360 (or 260) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Nine semester hours of upper-division coursework in human development and family sciences, or consent of instructor.

362. Children and Public Policy.
The positive and negative effects of policy on children and the policy landscape in several major domains of child and family life in the United States and in other countries. Human Development and Family Sciences 362 and 378K (Topic 4: Children and Public Policy) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in human development and family sciences, anthropology, education, psychology, sociology, or social work.

366. Fostering Social Competence in Young Children.
Same as Women's and Gender Studies 345 (Topic 4: Fostering Social Competence in Young Children). Child and adult interactions and guidance strategies that foster the social competence of young children. Two lecture hours a week for one semester, and four laboratory hours a week to be arranged as a four-hour block between 8:30 am and 4:45 pm, Monday through Thursday. Only one of the following may be counted: Child Development 316, 366, Human Development and Family Sciences 316, 366, Women's Studies 301 (Topic 8: Guidance in Adult-Child Relationships), 345 (Topic 4: Guidance in Adult-Child Relationships). Prerequisite: Human Development and Family Sciences 313 and 113L (or Child Development 313 and 113L), and three semester hours of upper-division coursework in human development and family sciences, education, psychology, or sociology.

371. Adolescent Development in Context.
The biological, cognitive, and social changes that occur during the second decade of life, including the developmental issues faced by adolescents. Human Development and Family Sciences 371 and 378K (Topic 1: Adolescence into Young Adulthood) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Human Development and Family Sciences 313 and 113L, or Psychology 304.

372K. Family Interaction and Development.
Analysis of interaction, transitions, and crises over the family life span. Prerequisite: Human Development and Family Sciences 304 (or Child Development 304), and three semester hours of upper-division coursework in human development and family sciences (or child development), cultural anthropology, education, psychology, sociology, or social work.

375. Economic Issues of the Family.
Economic issues experienced by families through the various stages of the life span. Prerequisite: Human Development and Family Sciences 304, and 312 or 322.

378K. Advanced Child and Family Development.
Concepts, theories, and issues in human development and family sciences. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in human development and family sciences (or child development), anthropology, education, psychology, sociology, or social work, and consent of instructor.

Topic 3: Infant and Toddler Development.

Topic 5: Media and the Family.

Topic 6: Introduction to Early Childhood Intervention.

378L. Theories of Child and Family Development.
Study and analysis of major theories in human and family development. Prerequisite: Human Development and Family Sciences 313 and 113L (or Child Development 313 and 113L), and three semester hours of upper-division coursework in human development and family sciences (or child development), education, psychology, sociology, or social work.

379H. Honors Tutorial Course.
Supervised individual research on a special topic in human development and family sciences; oral presentation and preparation of a scholarly paper covering the research. May be based on laboratory, library, or field research. Conference course. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, admission to the Human Development and Family Sciences Honors Program, Human Development and Family Sciences 359H (or Child Development 359H) with a grade of at least B, and consent of the honors adviser.

Human Ecology: H E

Upper-Division Courses

355. Problems Course.
Intensive study of selected problems of a transdisciplinary nature. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Some sections are offered on the pass/fail basis only; these are identified in the Course Schedule. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: Research in Family Economics.

361. Consumers and the Markets.
Internal and external factors that influence consumer choice-making behavior in the United States economy; analysis of consumer information resources and protective legislation at the federal and state levels. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and three semester hours of coursework in economics.

Nutrition: NTR

Lower-Division Courses

307. Introductory Foodscience.
Application of the principles of food chemistry to processing and preparation techniques. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Nutrition 107L.

107L. Introductory Food Science Laboratory.
Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Nutrition 307.

311. Introductory Nutrition.
Essential food components and their functions in life processes.

111L. Introductory Nutrition Laboratory.
Nutrient composition of food, computerized dietary analysis, and survey of the dietetic practice. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: For nutrition majors, concurrent enrollment in Nutrition 311 or consent of instructor; for nonmajors, consent of instructor.

315. Nutrition through the Life Cycle.
Adapting nutrition recommendations to physiological changes throughout the life span. Nutrition 315 and 328C may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Nutrition 311 with a grade of at least C.

316. Culture and Food.
Influence of culture on foodways around the world. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Nutrition 307 and 107L with a grade of at least C in each, or consent of instructor.

318. Assessment of Nutritional Status.
Assessment of nutritional status using anthropometric, biochemical, clinical, and dietary intake data, and development and implementation of effective care for individuals. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Nutrition 318 and 170L may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Nutrition 311 and 111L with a grade of at least C in each, or consent of instructor.

119S, 219S, 319S, 419S, 519S, 619S, 719S, 819S, 919S. Topics in Nutrition.
This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Center for Global Educational Opportunities. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Human Ecology. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Upper-Division Courses

324. Advanced Food Science.
Application of the principles of food chemistry to the development of food products. Offered in the spring semester only. Prerequisite: Nutrition 307, 107L, 342, and Chemistry 610A, with a grade of at least C in each, and credit or registration for Nutrition 124L.

124L. Advanced Food Science Laboratory.
Individual research project on food product development and evaluation. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered in the spring semester only. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Nutrition 324.

129S, 229S, 329S, 429S, 529S, 629S, 729S, 829S, 929S. Topics in Nutrition.
This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Center for Global Educational Opportunities. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Human Ecology. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

330. Nutrition Education and Counseling.
Application of counseling and learning theories to the care of individuals and groups in community and clinical settings. Prerequisite: Nutrition 315 with a grade of at least C, or consent of instructor.

332. Community Nutrition.
National and international issues in public health and nutrition programs. Prerequisite: Nutrition 311 with a grade of at least C.

334. Foodservice Systems Management.
Procurement, production, and service delivery in foodservice systems. Prerequisite: Nutrition 307 and 107L with a grade of at least C in each, and credit or registration for Nutrition 234L.

234L. Laboratory in Foodservice Systems.
Six laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Nutrition 334, or consent of instructor.

338W. Issues in Nutrition and Health.
Identifying, reading, analyzing, writing, and presenting scientific research on selected topics in nutrition and human health. Two lecture hours and two discussion hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit with a grade of at least C or registration for Biology 416L or 365R, and the following courses with a grade of at least C in each: Biology 416K, Nutrition 311 and 315, and Chemistry 369, or 339K and 339L; or consent of instructor.

342. Advanced Nutrition I.
Biochemical and molecular biological aspects of carbohydrate, fat, and amino acid metabolism. Prerequisite: Credit with a grade of at least C or registration for Biology 416L or 365R, and the following courses with a grade of at least C: Biology 416K, Chemistry 369, or 339K and 339L, Nutrition 311; or consent of instructor.

142L. Advanced Nutrition I Laboratory.
Basic laboratory techniques in nutrition assessment and research. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered in the fall semester only. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Nutrition 342 or consent of instructor.

344. Advanced Nutrition II.
Energy, minerals, vitamins, and selected special topics. Offered in the spring semester only. Nutrition 344 and 365 (Topic 1: Vitamins and Minerals) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Nutrition 342 with a grade of at least C, and credit or registration for Nutrition 144M.

144M. Advanced Nutrition II Laboratory.
Advanced laboratory techniques in nutrition assessment and research. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered in the spring semester only. Prerequisite: Nutrition 142L with a grade of at least C, and concurrent enrollment in Nutrition 344 or consent of instructor.

245C. Clinical Practice in Medical Nutrition Therapy.
Application of principles of medical nutrition therapy to the care of clients in the practice setting. Six hours of supervised practice a week for one semester. Offered in the fall semester only. Prerequisite: Nutrition 370 with a grade of at least C, credit or registration for 371, and admission to the Coordinated Program in Dietetics.

152, 252, 352. Field Experience in Nutrition.
For each semester hour of credit earned, three field placement hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Approval of application for field experience. Applications are available in the department office.

352C. Applied Normal and Community Nutrition.
Current issues in public health and delivery of nutrition care, including consultation. Supervised practice in one or more community agencies. Three lecture hours and ten hours of supervised practice a week for one semester. Offered in the spring semester only. Nutrition 352C and 274C may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Nutrition 355L with a grade of at least C.

155, 255, 355, 455. Undergraduate Research in Nutrition.
Supervised individual undergraduate research in nutrition. For each semester hour of credit earned, at least three laboratory hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit, but no more than four semester hours may be counted toward a degree in nutrition. Any additional hours must be taken on the pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

355L. Practicum in Dietetics.
Problem solving in the practice of administrative and clinical dietetics. Forty hours of supervised practice a week for four weeks. Offered in the fall semester only. Nutrition 355L and 772C may not both be counted. Nutrition 355L and 373S may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Nutrition 668B, 373, and 377K, with a grade of at least C in each.

355M. Advanced Food Systems Management.
Financial control, quality assurance, personnel administration, foodservice equipment, layout and design in foodservice operations. Analysis and evaluation of an organized foodservice operation. Three lecture hours and four hours of supervised practice a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Accounting 310F or 311, and Nutrition 334 and 234L, with a grade of at least C in each.

360. Selected Topics in Applied Nutrition.
May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: Nutrition and Athletic Performance. Common myths and current dietary practices of athletes, including cardiovascular exercise, marathon and triathlon training, weight training, weight loss, and dietary supplements. Prerequisite: Nutrition 342, and Biology 416L or 365S, with a grade of at least C in each; or consent of instructor.

162. Standards, Ethics, and Credentialing for Dietetic Practice.
Identification of standards and discussion of current issues in ethics and credentialing for dietetics practice. One lecture hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Nutrition 342, and Biology 416L or 365S, with a grade of at least C in each; or consent of instructor.

365. Selected Topics in Nutritional Sciences.
May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: Vitamins and Minerals. Biomedical, cellular and molecular, and clinical aspects of vitamins, minerals, and water. Nutrition 344 and 365 (Topic 1) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Nutrition 342, and Biology 416L or 365S with a grade of at least C in each; or consent of instructor.

Topic 2: Nutrition and Genes. Interactions between nutrients and gene expression, including heredity, gene regulation, metabolic disease, developmental abnormalities, and molecular techniques. Prerequisite: Nutrition 342, and Biology 416L or 365S with a grade of at least C in each; or consent of instructor.

Topic 3: Epidemiological and Statistical Methods in Nutrition. Basic principles and concepts of epidemiology and statistics in nutritional sciences. Prerequisite: Nutrition 342 with a grade of at least C, or consent of instructor.

366L. Research Methods in Nutritional Sciences.
Focuses on state-of-the-art research in nutrition, including biochemistry and molecular biological techniques for nutrient-gene interactions, enzyme and coenzyme functions, and nutrient analysis of biologic materials. Includes data analysis and statistical methods. One lecture hour and six laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Nutrition 142L with a grade of at least C, or consent of instructor.

167. Undergraduate Seminar in Nutritional Sciences.
One lecture hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

668. Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics.
Rationale for dietary modification in prevention and treatment of disease. For 668A, three lecture hours and six to eight hours of supervised practice a week for one semester; for 668B, sixteen lecture hours and twenty-four hours of supervised practice a week for four weeks, then forty hours of supervised practice a week for two weeks. Nutrition 668A and 370 may not both be counted. Nutrition 668B and 371 may not both be counted; Nutrition 668B and 772C may not both be counted. Prerequisite: For 668A, Nutrition 145C, Applied Learning and Development 320, and Biology 416L (or Zoology 316K), with a grade of at least C in each; for 668B, Nutrition 668A with a grade of at least C.

370. Medical Nutrition Therapy I.
The role of nutrition in prevention and treatment of chronic disease such as diabetes and heart disease. Nutrition 668A and 370 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Nutrition 342 and Biology 416L (or Zoology 316K) with a grade of at least C in each.

170L. Laboratory in Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics.
Assessment, planning, implementation, and evaluation in delivery of nutritional care to individuals and groups. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered in the spring semester only. Nutrition 318 and 170L may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Nutrition 370 or consent of instructor.

371. Medical Nutrition Therapy II.
Nutritional care of critically ill patients, including techniques of nutrition support. Nutrition 668B and 371 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Nutrition 370 with a grade of at least C, or consent of instructor.

772C. Practicum in Clinical Dietetics.
Supervised practice in health care facilities. Thirty-six hours of supervised practice a week for ten weeks. Offered in the spring semester only. Nutrition 668B and 772C may not both be counted. Nutrition 355L and 772C may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Nutrition 245C and 371 with a grade of at least C in each, and admission to the Coordinated Program in Dietetics.

572F. Practicum in Food Services Systems Management.
Supervised practice in food service facilities. Thirty-six hours of supervised practice a week for six weeks. Offered in the spring semester only. Nutrition 572F and 373 may not both be counted. Nutrition 572F and 377K may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Nutrition 245C and 355M with a grade of at least C in each, and admission to the Coordinated Program in Dietetics.

373. Organization and Management in Food Service Systems.
Policies and practices in food service systems. Four lecture hours and sixteen hours of supervised practice a week for six weeks. Offered in the fall semester only. Nutrition 572F and 373 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: The following courses, with a grade of at least C in each: Nutrition 334, 234L, 145C, and Management 336.

373S. Integrative Seminar in Dietetics.
Integration of theory and practice on the basis of practicum experience. Two lecture hours and three discussion hours a week for one semester. Offered in the spring semester only. Nutrition 355L and 373S may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

274C. Practicum in Community Dietetics.
Supervised practice in one or more community agencies. Forty hours of supervised practice a week for four weeks. Offered in the summer session only. Nutrition 352C and 274C may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Nutrition 772C, 572F, and 373S with a grade of at least C in each; and admission to the Coordinated Program in Dietetics.

174P. Advanced Practicum in Dietetics.
Culminating experience in the practice of administrative, clinical, or community dietetics. Forty hours of supervised practice a week for two weeks. Offered in the summer session only. Prerequisite: Nutrition 772C, 572F, and 373S with a grade of at least C in each, and admission to the Coordinated Program in Dietetics.

377K. Equipment and Layout in Food Service Systems.
Design, safety, and sanitation in food service systems. Four lecture hours and sixteen hours of supervised practice a week for six weeks. Offered in the fall semester only. Nutrition 572F and 377K may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Nutrition 334, 234L, and 145C, with a grade of at least C in each.

379H. Honors Tutorial Course.
Supervised individual research on a special topic in nutrition; oral presentation and preparation of a scholarly paper covering the research. May be based on laboratory, library, or field research. Conference course. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: Admission to the Nutrition Honors Program, and consent of the honors adviser and instructor.

Textiles and Apparel: TXA

Lower-Division Courses

205. Textiles.
Chemical and physical properties of fibers and yarns, fabric construction, and finishes. Two lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Textiles and Apparel 105L.

105L. Textiles Laboratory.
Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Textiles and Apparel 205.

212K. Apparel Design.
Introduction to the integrated apparel design industry from the creative and merchandising perspective. Two lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Textiles and Apparel 316L, 316Q, or 319 with a grade of at least C, and credit with a grade of at least C or registration for Textiles and Apparel 212L.

212L. Apparel Design Laboratory.
Four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Textiles and Apparel 212K.

315K. Field Experience I.
Application of merchandising strategic planning in a professional environment with faculty and site director supervision. At least 154 hours of supervised fieldwork for one semester. Prerequisite: Admission to the Retailing Merchandising Internship Program.

316L. Apparel I Laboratory.
Industrial techniques of pattern design and garment construction. Six laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Admission to the textiles and apparel program, Textiles and Apparel 205 and 105L with a grade of at least C in each, and credit with a grade of at least C or registration for Textiles and Apparel 319.

316Q. Sewn Products Analysis.
Evaluation of soft goods, including materials, quality of work, and costs. Prerequisite: Textiles and Apparel 205 and 105L with a grade of at least C in each.

319. Visual Merchandising and Display Techniques.
Techniques of merchandise presentation, including principles and practice in display planning, execution, and coordination. Prerequisite: Admission to the textiles and apparel program.

119S, 219S, 319S, 419S, 519S, 619S, 719S, 819S, 919S. Topics in Textiles and Apparel.
This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Center for Global Educational Opportunities. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Human Ecology. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Upper-Division Courses

325K. Culture, Gender, and Appearance.
Social, economic, aesthetic, and political aspects of historic costume and of the evolution of modern dress. Prerequisite: Textiles and Apparel 319 with a grade of at least C, or Art History 301.

325L. Culture, Gender, and Appearance I.
Social, economic, aesthetic, and political aspects of costume evolution from ancient times through the Renaissance. Textiles and Apparel 325K and 325L may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Textiles and Apparel 319 with a grade of at least C, or Art History 301.

325M. Culture, Gender, and Appearance II.
Social, economic, aesthetic, and political aspects of costume evolution from the Baroque period through modern times. Textiles and Apparel 325K and 325M may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Textiles and Apparel 319 with a grade of at least C, or Art History 301.

126. Apparel II.
Advanced apparel construction techniques using industry standards and portfolio development. One lecture hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Textiles and Apparel 316L with a grade of at least C and credit or registration for Textiles and Apparel 226L.

226L. Apparel II Laboratory.
Advanced apparel construction techniques using industry standards and portfolio development. Six laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Textiles and Apparel 126.

327. Clothing and Human Behavior.
The social significance of clothing and the influence of clothing on behavior. Prerequisite: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in psychology, sociology, or the Department of Human Ecology.

328. Research in Retail Merchandising.
Basic research methodology and academic writing. Prerequisite: Marketing 320F and Textiles and Apparel 205 and 105L with a grade of at least C in each.

129S, 229S, 329S, 429S, 529S, 629S, 729S, 829S, 929S. Topics in Textiles and Apparel.
This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Center for Global Educational Opportunities. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Human Ecology. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

352D. Field Experience in Apparel Design.
Application of apparel design techniques and principles in a professional environment. At least 45 hours of fieldwork for one semester. Prerequisite: Admission to the Apparel Design Internship Program, Textiles and Apparel 164K (both Topic 1: Flat Pattern and Topic 2: Draping) and 264L (both Topic 1: Flat Pattern and Topic 2: Draping) with a grade of at least C in each, and credit with a grade of at least C or registration for Textiles and Apparel 164K (Topic 3: Advanced Apparel Design) and 264L (Topic 3: Advanced Apparel Design).

352M. Field Experience in Retail Merchandising.
Application of merchandising techniques and principles in a professional environment. At least 154 hours of supervised fieldwork for one semester. Prerequisite: Admission to the Retail Merchandising Internship Program.

155, 355. Problems Course.
Intensive study of selected problems of an interdisciplinary nature. For each semester hour of credit earned, the equivalent of one lecture hour a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Some sections are offered on the pass/fail basis only; these are identified in the Course Schedule. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

355C. Computer-Aided Design for Apparel.
Computer technology used to create textile prints, weaves, illustrations, flat patterns, promotional pieces, and pattern markers. One lecture hour and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Textiles and Apparel 355 (Topic 1: Computer-Aided Design for Apparel) and 355C may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Textiles and Apparel 205 and 105L with a grade of at least C in each; and credit with a grade of at least C or registration for Textiles and Apparel 164K (Topic 1: Flat Pattern) and 264L (Topic 1: Flat Pattern).

355D. Textiles Artifact Management and Conservation.
Principles and techniques in the identification, documentation, conservation, and exhibition of textile-based artifacts. Six laboratory hours a week for one semester. Textiles and Apparel 355 (Topic: Textiles Artifact Management and Conservation) and 355D may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Textiles and Apparel 325M.

355K. Textile and Apparel Economics.
Economic and regulatory aspects of the textile and apparel industries. Prerequisite: Textiles and Apparel 205 and 105L with a grade of at least C in each, and Economics 304K and 304L with a grade of at least C in each.

355N. History of Textiles.
Role of textiles in the social, economic, aesthetic, and technological development of society; including production and design of textiles throughout history. Prerequisite: Textiles and Apparel 205 and 105L and three semester hours of coursework in art history, with a grade of at least C in each course.

355P. Problems in Retail Merchandising.
Intensive study of selected problems related to field experience; development of analytical and problem-solving skills for retailing. At least 154 hours of supervised fieldwork for one semester. Prerequisite: Admission to the Retail Merchandising Internship Program.

359H. Honors Reading Course.
Supervised individual reading on special subjects. Conference course. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, a University grade point average of at least 3.00, and consent of the undergraduate adviser.

260L. Advanced Textiles.
Composition, structure, and properties of textile products; contributions of textile research. Two lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Textiles and Apparel 205 and 105L; Chemistry 301, 302, and 204; six semester hours of upper-division coursework in textiles and apparel with a grade of at least C in each course; and credit with a grade of at least C or registration for Textiles and Apparel 260M.

260M. Advanced Textiles Laboratory.
Analysis and evaluation of textile performance. Six laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Textiles and Apparel 260L.

164K. Advanced Problems in Clothing.
Creative application of flat pattern or draping processes. One lecture hour a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Textiles and Apparel 212K, 212L, 316L, 126, and 226L, with a grade of at least C in each; and credit with a grade of at least C or registration for the same topic of Textiles and Apparel 264L.

Topic 1: Flat Pattern.

Topic 2: Draping.

Topic 3: Advanced Apparel Design.

264L. Advanced Problems in Apparel Laboratory.
Six laboratory hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Credit with a grade of at least C or registration for the same topic of Textiles and Apparel 164K.

Topic 1: Flat Pattern.

Topic 2: Draping.

Topic 3: Advanced Apparel Design.

376. Principles of Retail Merchandising.
Retail strategic planning and implementation for soft goods and apparel. Six lecture hours a week for at least nine weeks. Prerequisite: Marketing 320F and six semester hours of upper-division coursework in textiles and apparel, business, studio art, or journalism.

379H. Honors Tutorial Course.
Supervised individual research on a special topic in textiles and apparel; oral presentation and preparation of a scholarly paper covering the research. May be based on laboratory, library, or field research. Conference course. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, admission to the Textiles and Apparel Honors Program, Textiles and Apparel 359H with a grade of at least B, and consent of the honors adviser.

 


Top of File     

Previous File in Chapter 10 | Next File in Chapter 10

      

 

Undergraduate Catalog
Contents
Chapter 1 - The University
Chapter 2 - School of Architecture
Chapter 3 - Red McCombs School of Business
Chapter 4 - College of Communication
Chapter 5 - College of Education
Chapter 6 - College of Engineering
Chapter 7 - College of Fine Arts
Chapter 8 - School of Information
Chapter 9 - College of Liberal Arts
Chapter 10 - College of Natural Sciences
Chapter 11 - School of Nursing
Chapter 12 - College of Pharmacy
Chapter 13 - School of Social Work
Chapter 14 - The Faculty
Texas Common Course Numbering System (Appendix A)
Appendix B - Degree and Course Abbreviations

Related Information
Catalogs
Course Schedules
Academic Calendars
Office of Admissions


Office of the Registrar
University of Texas at Austin

17 August 2004. Registrar's Web Team

Send comments to Official Publications