The University Office of the Registrar University of Texas at Austin
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Undergraduate Catalog | 2006-2008
The University
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Honors

Except as noted, the following programs, scholarships, and organizations are open to all qualified undergraduates. Honors available through the colleges and schools are described in chapters 2 through 15.

Honor Societies for Freshmen

Alpha Lambda Delta and Phi Eta Sigma are national honor societies that recognize scholastic attainment during the freshman year. Members are chosen each fall and spring. Membership is offered to students who earn a grade point average of at least 3.50 during the first semester of their freshman year while completing at least twelve semester hours of coursework. Students who do not qualify during the first semester may become eligible by earning a grade point average of at least 3.50 for the first two semesters of work combined.

Junior Fellows Program

The Junior Fellows Program provides recognition for outstanding students who have completed four semesters, or about sixty semester hours of coursework. Chosen annually from the best students across the campus, junior fellows are given the opportunity to do independent study and research with distinguished professors of their choice and to have that research supported by small grants, if necessary. The program is administered by the College of Liberal Arts, but undergraduates in all colleges and schools are eligible to take part. Students who wish to be considered should apply in February. Application forms are available in the Liberal Arts Honors Program Office, Dorothy Gebauer Building 1.206.

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College Scholars

On Honors Day each spring, the University designates outstanding students as College Scholars and Distinguished College Scholars. Students who are eligible for recognition receive invitations to the Honors Day convocation about three weeks before Honors Day.

To be designated a College Scholar, a student must meet the following requirements:

  1. The student must be registered as an undergraduate for at least twelve semester hours of coursework, unless he or she lacks fewer than twelve hours to complete degree requirements. Students who hold an undergraduate degree are not eligible.
  2. The student must have completed at least twelve semester hours of coursework in either the spring or the fall semester of the previous calendar year.
  3. The student must have completed at least thirty semester hours of coursework at the University, excluding credit by examination, and at least sixty semester hours of college coursework, including transferred work and credit by examination.
  4. The student must have an in-residence University grade point average of at least 3.50.

To be designated a Distinguished College Scholar, a student must meet the following requirements:

  1. The student must be registered as an undergraduate for at least fifteen semester hours of coursework, unless he or she lacks fewer than fifteen hours to complete degree requirements. Students who hold an undergraduate degree are not eligible.
  2. The student must have completed at least fifteen semester hours of coursework in either the spring or the fall semester of the previous calendar year.
  3. The student must have completed at least thirty semester hours of coursework at the University, excluding credit by examination, and at least sixty semester hours of college coursework, including transferred work and credit by examination.
  4. The student must have an in-residence University grade point average of at least 3.80.

University Honors

Each semester, undergraduates who complete a full course load and earn outstanding grades are recognized by inclusion on the University Honors list. Each time a student is included on the list, his or her official record also shows the award of University Honors for that semester. The list is compiled at the end of the fall and spring semesters but not at the end of the summer session. To be included, a student must earn at least forty-five grade points and a grade point average of at least 3.50 on courses completed in residence and must have no incomplete grades (symbol X).

Students are notified on the semester grade report of their inclusion on the list.

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Scholarships

British Marshall scholarships. British Marshall scholarships allow young Americans of high ability to study for a degree in the system of higher education of their choice in the United Kingdom. Each scholarship offers two years or more of postgraduate study. Up to forty new awards are offered every year in the United States. Students should apply in their senior year. Applications are due in the Liberal Arts Honors Program Office, Dorothy Gebauer Building 1.206, in early September.

Rhodes scholarships. Rhodes scholarships are for outstanding United States citizens who are between eighteen and twenty-four on October 1 of the year of application. Students should apply in their senior year. Each scholarship offers two years or more of postgraduate study at the University of Oxford. Thirty-two scholarships are assigned annually to the United States. Applications are due in the Liberal Arts Honors Program Office, Dorothy Gebauer Building 1.206, in early September.

Harry S. Truman scholarships. The Harry S. Truman Foundation awards seventy-five to eighty $30,000 merit-based scholarships annually to college students who wish to attend graduate school in preparation for careers in government or elsewhere in public service. Applicants must be in the top quarter of their class, with a grade point average of at least 3.80, and must be United States citizens or nationals. Each scholarship covers tuition, fees, books, and room and board, to a maximum of $3,000 for the student's senior year. In addition, Truman Scholars receive $13,500 yearly if enrolled in a two-year graduate program or $9,000 yearly if enrolled in a three-year graduate program. They also receive leadership training, graduate school counseling, preferential admission and merit-based aid at some premier graduate institutions, and internship opportunities with federal agencies. Students who will be seniors the following academic year should apply to the Liberal Arts Honors Program Office, Dorothy Gebauer Building 1.206, in mid-October.

Phi Beta Kappa

Phi Beta Kappa, the oldest and best known honorary society in America, was founded by students at the College of William and Mary in 1776. The Alpha of Texas chapter was organized at the University in 1904–1905. Eligibility is limited to upper-division students of the Colleges of Fine Arts, Liberal Arts, and Natural Sciences and the Jackson School of Geosciences who achieve distinguished scholastic records while taking the Bachelor of Arts; the Bachelor of Arts in Art with a major in art history; the Bachelor of Arts in Music; the Bachelor of Arts in Theatre and Dance; or the Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry, Biology, Chemistry, Computer Sciences, Geological Sciences, Mathematics, Physics, or Psychology. The student must have completed at least sixty semester hours of coursework at the University.

Elections to Phi Beta Kappa are held in the fall, spring, and summer each year. Alumni members are occasionally selected from among graduates of at least five years' standing who have won appropriate distinction since graduation; honorary members are selected for special merit.

Phi Kappa Phi

Phi Kappa Phi is a national honor society recognizing academic achievement in all fields. Members are chosen twice a year. Upper-division and graduate students are eligible for membership if they have completed at least sixty semester hours of coursework at the University and have the required grade point average. The University chapter typically invites to membership fewer than 6 percent of undergraduates and fewer than 10 percent of graduate students.

Leadership and Service Organizations

Mortar Board and Omicron Delta Kappa recognize and encourage scholarship, leadership, and service. Members of Mortar Board are chosen each spring; members of Omicron Delta Kappa are chosen in the fall and in the spring.

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Graduation with University Honors

To be eligible to graduate with University Honors, an undergraduate must have completed at least sixty semester hours at the University of Texas at Austin. Graduation with University Honors is based on the average of all grades earned in courses taken in residence at the University, whether the courses were passed, failed, or repeated. Courses taken pass/fail are counted in the sixty-hour minimum, but only letter grades (including Fs in pass/fail courses) are used to determine the grade point average.

The faculty of each college or school determines the percentage of the graduating class of that division to receive honors, high honors, and highest honors and the minimum grade point average for each category, subject to the following requirements:

  1. No more than 20 percent of the May graduating class of each college or school may receive honors, high honors, and highest honors. No more than 10 percent of the class may receive high honors and highest honors. No more than 4 percent may receive highest honors.
  2. Honors graduates must have a grade point average of at least 3.30 in courses taken in residence at the University

The faculty may adopt college- or school-wide standards or may designate grade point average and percentage requirements for each program within the college or school, but the percentage of the college or school class receiving honors, high honors, and highest honors may not exceed those above.

Percentage requirements are not applied to August and December graduating classes. The grade point averages established for May graduates are applied to the following August and December classes to determine honors, high honors, and highest honors.

 
  Honors High Honors Highest Honors

College or School

Rank
Min.
GPA [6]

Rank
Min.
GPA [6]

Rank
Min.
GPA [6]
School of Architecture top 20% 3.30 top 10% 3.30 top 4% 3.30
McCombs School of Business [7] top 20% 3.50 top 10% 3.65 top 4% 3.80
College of Communication [8] top 20% 3.465 top 10% 3.665 top 4% 3.865
College of Education top 20% 3.50 top 10% 3.65 top 4% 3.80
College of Engineering [9] top 20% 3.50 top 10% 3.70 top 4% 3.85
College of Fine Arts [10] top 20% 3.30 top 10% 3.60 top 4% 3.85
Jackson School of Geosciences top 20% 3.30 top 10% 3.667 top 4% 3.867
College of Liberal Arts top 20% 3.30 top 10% 3.667 top 4% 3.867
College of Natural Sciences top 20% 3.30 top 10% 3.667 top 4% 3.867
School of Nursing top 20% 3.30 top 10% 3.30 top 4% 3.30
College of Pharmacy top 20% 3.30 top 10% 3.30 top 4% 3.30
School of Social Work top 20% 3.30 top 10% 3.30 top 4% 3.30

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Academic Advising

The University views sound academic advising as a significant responsibility in educating students. Academic advisers assist students in developing intellectual potential and exploring educational opportunities and life goals. Many people in the campus community contribute to the advising process, including faculty, staff, student, and professional advisers. Through the relationship established between adviser and student within a friendly, helpful, and professional atmosphere, a student has the opportunity to learn about educational options, degree requirements, and academic policies and procedures; to clarify educational objectives; to plan and pursue programs consistent with abilities, interests, and life goals; and to use all resources of the University to best advantage.

Ultimately, the student is responsible for seeking adequate academic advice, for knowing and meeting degree requirements, and for enrolling in appropriate courses to ensure orderly and timely progress toward a degree. Frequent adviser contact provides students with current academic information and promotes progress toward educational goals. The University supports that progress and encourages effective academic advising campus-wide.

The advising systems of the colleges and schools are described in chapters 2 through 15.

Student Responsibility

While University faculty and staff members give students academic advice and assistance, each student is expected to take responsibility for his or her education and personal development. The student must know and abide by the academic and disciplinary policies given in this catalog and in General Information, including rules governing quantity of work, the standard of work required to continue in the University, scholastic probation and dismissal, and enforced withdrawal. The student must also know and meet the requirements of his or her degree program, including the University's basic education requirements; must enroll in courses appropriate to the program; must meet prerequisites and take courses in the proper sequence to ensure orderly and timely progress; and must seek advice about degree requirements and other University policies when necessary.

The student must give correct local and permanent postal addresses, telephone numbers, and e-mail address to the Office of the Registrar and to the offices of the student's deans and must notify these offices immediately of any changes. Official correspondence is sent to the postal or e-mail address last given to the registrar; if the student has failed to correct this address, he or she will not be relieved of responsibility on the grounds that the correspondence was not delivered.

The student must verify his or her schedule of classes each semester, must see that necessary corrections are made, and must keep documentation of all schedule changes and other transactions.

All students should be familiar with the following sources of information:

University catalogs. General Information gives important information about academic policies and procedures that apply to all students. It includes the official academic calendar, admission procedures and residence requirements, information about tuition and fees, and policies on quantity of work, grades and the grade point average, credit by examination and correspondence, adding and dropping courses, withdrawal from the University, and scholastic probation and dismissal. This catalog also gives historical and current information about the University's organization and physical facilities. It describes the services of the Division of Student Affairs and the libraries and research facilities that support the University's academic programs.

The Undergraduate Catalog gives information about degrees offered by the undergraduate divisions and lists the faculty. The chapter for each college or school describes the academic policies and procedures that apply to students in that division and lists the division's undergraduate courses. The Graduate Catalog and the Law School Catalog give similar information about graduate programs and the programs of the School of Law.

Printed catalogs are available at campus-area bookstores and by mail from the Office of the Registrar. The online catalogs are available at http://www.utexas.edu/student/registrar/.

The Course Schedule. The Course Schedule is published by the Office of the Registrar and is available through the registrar's Web site before registration for each semester and summer session. It includes information about registration and payment procedures; meeting times, locations, instructors, and prerequisites of courses offered; and advising locations.

Dean's offices. In each college, the office of the assistant or associate dean for student affairs serves as a central source of information about academic affairs and student services. The student should consult the dean's office staff for information not provided in the publications listed above; a student who is in doubt about any University regulation should always seek clarification in the dean's office before proceeding.

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Graduation

The University holds commencement exercises at the end of the spring semester. Each college and school also holds a commencement ceremony in the spring, and many hold graduation exercises in the fall. Graduating students are encouraged to participate. Those who graduate in the summer or fall may attend Commencement the following spring. Each student should consult his or her dean early in the semester of graduation for information about commencement activities and procedures.

No degree will be conferred except on publicly announced dates.

General Requirements

To receive an undergraduate degree from the University of Texas at Austin, a student must fulfill all requirements for the degree as set forth in a catalog under which he or she is eligible to graduate and any special requirements of the college or school and department offering the degree, as well as the following minimum general requirements:

  1. The student must have a grade point average of at least 2.00 on all courses undertaken at the University (including credit by examination, correspondence, and extension) for which a grade or symbol other than Q, W, X, or CR is recorded. Additional requirements imposed by a college or school, if any, are given in the college's chapter of this catalog.
  2. The student must fulfill the following requirements regarding coursework taken in residence. Residence credit includes only courses taken at the University of Texas at Austin; it does not include credit by examination, courses taken by extension or correspondence, and online courses that are recorded as transfer credit. Coursework in University-approved affiliated study abroad programs (international provider programs) is treated as residence credit for requirements 2a and 2b below. However, coursework in University-approved affiliated study abroad programs may not be used to fulfill requirement 2c.
    1. The student must complete in residence at least sixty semester hours of coursework counted toward the degree. [11]
    2. Twenty-four of the last thirty semester hours counted toward the degree must be completed in residence.
    3. At least six semester hours of advanced coursework in the major must be completed in residence.
           Additional requirements imposed by a college or school, if any, are given in the college's chapter of this catalog. Many degree plans include residence rules in addition to the above University-wide requirements; the appropriate academic units have the discretion to determine applicability of University-approved affiliated study abroad credit toward all college- and school-specific requirements for coursework in residence. Course equivalency and University approval of study abroad courses are determined by the appropriate academic units.
  3. Coursework in American government and American history (the legislative requirement):
    1. Each student must complete six semester hours of coursework in American government, including Texas government. Because these courses are not electives, they may not be taken on the pass/fail basis at the University. Credit by examination may be counted toward the requirement.
           The six hours of coursework used to fulfill the requirement must cover both the United States and the Texas constitutions. Texas colleges and universities differ in the way they include this material in the courses they offer. As a result, some combinations of government courses taken at different institutions do not fulfill the requirement, even though they provide six hours of credit. The following combinations of coursework, some of which include transferred work, fulfill the government requirement at the University:
      1. Government 310L and 312L
      2. Government 310L and three hours of transfer credit in United States government (entered into the student's University record as "GOV 3 US")
      3. Government 310L and three hours of transfer credit in Texas government ("GOV 3 TX")
      4. Three hours of transfer credit in United States government ("GOV 3 US") and three hours of transfer credit in Texas government ("GOV 3 TX")
           A number of topics of Government 312L are offered each semester. Because some of these topics deal with state government and some deal with federal government, credit for Government 312L in combination with transfer credit in United States government ("GOV 3 US") or in Texas government ("GOV 3 TX") may fail to fulfill the legislative requirement. If a student has such a combination of credit, his or her dean's office will evaluate the coursework to determine whether both the state and the federal components of the requirement have been met.
           Students in the College of Engineering may count three hours of ROTC coursework (air force science, military science, or naval science) toward fulfillment of this requirement. Students in the College of Pharmacy may substitute three hours of ROTC coursework for Government 312L. In both colleges, ROTC coursework may be counted toward the government requirement only by students who complete the ROTC program and receive a commission.
    2. Each student must complete six semester hours of coursework in American history. Up to three hours in Texas history may be counted toward this requirement. Because these courses are not electives, they may not be taken on the pass/fail basis at the University. Credit by examination may be counted toward the requirement.
           In the College of Liberal Arts, ROTC courses that are cross-listed may be used as appropriate to fulfill other degree requirements. Students should consult the staff in the Office of the Dean, Student Division, to learn whether an ROTC course may be counted toward the legislative requirement.
  4. A candidate for a degree must be registered at the University either in residence or in absentia the semester or summer session the degree is to be awarded and must apply to the dean for the degree no later than the date specified in the official academic calendar. To receive a degree from the McCombs School of Business or the College of Communication, Education, Engineering, or Natural Sciences, the student must be registered in that college or school.

Multiple Degrees

No second bachelor's degree will be conferred until the candidate has completed at least twenty-four semester hours in addition to those counted toward the bachelor's degree that requires the higher number of hours of credit. The McCombs School of Business, the Colleges of Education and Engineering, and the School of Nursing require the student to complete at least twenty-four hours in addition to those counted toward the first bachelor's degree. A student may not receive the same degree twice.

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Graduation under a Particular Catalog

To receive a bachelor's degree, a student must fulfill all the degree requirements in a catalog under which he or she is eligible to graduate; the choices open to students in each college and school are explained below. The student must complete degree requirements within a specified time period; if he or she leaves school to enter military service during a national emergency, the time required to meet the military obligation is excluded from the time allowed for completion of the degree.

A student who transfers to the University from another Texas public institution of higher education has the same catalog choices that he or she would have had if the dates of attendance at the University had been the same as the dates of attendance at the other institution.

Since each college and school must retain the flexibility to improve its curriculum, course offerings may be changed during the student's education. If a course required under a previous catalog is no longer offered, students eligible to graduate according to that catalog should consult the dean of the college to learn whether another course may be used to fulfill the requirement.

Catalog choices. The catalog choices open to business, engineering, nursing, and pharmacy students are described below. In all other divisions, a student may graduate under the catalog covering any academic year in which he or she was enrolled at the University. Whichever catalog the student chooses, all degree requirements must be completed within six years (seven years for the Bachelor of Architecture) of the end of the two-year period covered by that catalog. For example, a student who chooses to graduate according to the requirements in the 2006–2008 catalog must do so by the end of the summer session 2014 (2015 for the Bachelor of Architecture).

McCombs School of Business. A business student may graduate under the catalog covering any academic year in which he or she was enrolled at the University. A business honors student who adds a second business major must graduate under the same catalog for both majors.

Whichever catalog the student chooses, all degree requirements must be completed within six years of the end of the two-year period covered by that catalog. For example, a student who chooses to graduate according to the requirements in the 2006–2008 catalog must do so by the end of the summer session 2014.

College of Engineering. An engineering student may graduate under the catalog covering any academic year in which he or she was enrolled in the college. Whichever catalog the student chooses, all degree requirements must be completed within six years of the end of the two-year period covered by that catalog. For example, a student who chooses to graduate according to the requirements in the 2006–2008 catalog must do so by the end of the summer session 2014.

Course substitutions in the degree program are permitted only with the approval of the departmental undergraduate adviser and the dean.

School of Nursing. A nursing student may graduate under the catalog covering any academic year in which he or she was enrolled in the School of Nursing. Whichever catalog the student chooses, all degree requirements must be completed within six years of the end of the two-year period covered by that catalog. For example, a student who chooses to graduate according to the requirements in the 2006–2008 catalog must do so by the end of the summer session 2014.

College of Pharmacy. A pharmacy student may graduate under the catalog in effect immediately preceding the student's admission to the college or the catalog covering any academic year in which he or she was enrolled in the professional curriculum in the college. Whichever catalog they choose, students must complete all degree requirements within seven years of the end of the two-year period covered by that catalog. For example, a student who chooses to graduate according to the requirements in the 2006–2008 catalog must do so by the end of the summer session 2015.

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Undergraduate Catalog | 2006-2008
The University
page 3 of 4 in Chapter 1
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The University Office of the Registrar University of Texas at Austin copyright 2006
Official Publications 15 Aug 2006