College of Communication Office of the Registrar University of Texas at Austin
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Undergraduate Catalog | 2006-2008
College of Communication
page 1 of 8 in Chapter 4
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4. College of Communication

Roderick Hart, PhD
Dean
Mark Bernstein, EdD
Associate Dean
Stephen Reese, PhD
Associate Dean
Janice M. Daman, MBA
Assistant Dean
Darrell D. Rocha, BA
Assistant Dean
Web site
communication.utexas.edu

General Information

In an increasingly crowded and complex world, communication plays many roles. Accurate communication from person to person and from individual to public is essential to understanding, and understanding is basic to intelligent agreement or disagreement. The swift exchange of information permits business to grow, stimulates public taste, and brings about change while helping individuals and institutions to adapt to change. Decreasing the time between the discovery of new knowledge by scientist, scholar, or industrial experimenter and the comprehension of this knowledge by large segments of the public counteracts inertia and spreads the benefits of such discoveries. Communication makes possible the marshaling of public opinion and increases the effectiveness of forces for political progress.

The academic discipline of communication combines the characteristics of an art and of a science. Those who study communication as an art seek to improve in themselves and in others the oral, written, and visual skills of exchanging information. As a science, communication emphasizes the objective study and investigation of this fundamental aspect of human behavior.

The degree programs of the College of Communication do not represent all of the academic disciplines concerned with the process of communication or the effects of communication on the individual and society. Engineering and physics shape and design the instruments by which communication is transmitted, and in the process become involved with human desires and reactions. Linguistics investigates the symbols by which human beings convey messages to each other. All language study bears on the process of communication. Art, drama, music, and literature are forms of communication. Psychology studies the relationship of communication to the individual, and sociology examines the impact of communication on society. Education relies heavily on effective communication. Thus the student who majors in the College of Communication should find relationships between the major and every course in the program. The major should give focus to the student's educational experience at the University. Those who minor in one of the communication fields should find means of increasing their personal effectiveness through developing skill in writing and speaking and in discerning the role of the mass media in the communication process in society.

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Facilities

In addition to the extensive library and computer resources of the University, certain special resources provide support for work in communication. Chief among them is the Jesse H. Jones Communication Center. Communication Building A (CMA) is a six-level building housing classrooms, offices, and sophisticated multimedia facilities. All of the instructional and office spaces are equipped with Ethernet. Communication Building B (CMB), a nine-level production building, houses Austin's public television station, KLRU, and the National Public Radio station KUT-FM. Also housed in Communication Building B are teaching and production facilities for the School of Journalism and the Department of Radio-Television-Film.

These facilities provide opportunities for academic programs that cross disciplinary lines, interrelate print and electronic media, and otherwise combine the resources of the college in ways not feasible within any one of the component units.

Although students have access to the college's computer writing laboratory, they are encouraged to purchase personal computers for their own use.

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Financial Assistance Available through the College of Communication

The College of Communication has a large number of scholarships that are awarded annually. Students interested in receiving one of these scholarships should apply by January 25 for scholarships to be awarded the following fall semester. Application forms are available in the Office of Student Affairs, Jesse H. Jones Communication Center (Building A) A4.140, (512) 471-1553. Each academic unit also awards scholarships. For further information, contact the Office of Student Affairs or the academic unit.

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Academic Advising

The Office of Student Affairs (CMA 4.140), in collaboration with the academic units, oversees all advising in the college. Students should consult advisers in the student affairs office to make sure that they are meeting all degree requirements and are taking courses appropriate to the degree.

For advising in depth on specific programs of study, courses, and career choices in their majors, students should consult their academic advisers. Some academic units require that the student be advised before registering to ensure that he or she takes courses in sequential order. Students in these units must see the academic adviser or a specific faculty member for approval to register for courses in the major. Finally, each student should consult advisers in the student affairs office for assistance in preparing for graduation.

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Communication Career Services

Communication Career Services (CCS) provides a variety of career development and job/internship search programs for students, alumni, and employers. The office's online systems link clients to the CCS job and internship databases and on-campus interviewing and résumé referral programs. Communication job and internship fairs, on-campus interviews, and a wide range of job search workshops and career exploration programs provide networking opportunities and allow students to explore their career options, gain experience, and build their career management skills. Individual career counseling, prelaw advising, and an extensive library and Web site offer additional resources to help candidates research and prepare for the job market in a wide variety of media, communication, and other related industries.

As a complement to the assistance available from the college, the University's Career Exploration Center provides career counseling services to all students. The center offers professional career counseling, skill and interest inventories and tests, and assistance to students in choosing or changing their majors and considering graduate study.

The University makes no promise to secure employment for each graduate.

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Student Organizations

Student organizations provide an opportunity for students to meet fellow students within their major, learn about a major or career, hear from professionals in the field, and gain hands-on experience in club administration and leadership. One organization students may join is the Communication Council. The Communication Council is the governing body for student activities in the college. The Communication Council acts as a representative of all undergraduate communication students and sponsors college-wide programs such as "Comm Week" and the "Communication Career Expo," as well as a number of day-to-day services tailored for individual student needs. A list of other student organizations within the college is available online.

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Admission and Registration

Admission to the University

Admission and readmission of all students to the University is the responsibility of the director of admissions. Information about admission to the University is given in General Information. Admission to a major may be restricted by the availability of instructional resources.

Admission Policies of the College of Communication

Students admitted to the University with deficiencies in high school units must remove them by the means prescribed in General Information. Course credit used to remove deficiencies may not be counted toward the student's degree.

A few students who already have a bachelor's degree and who are not candidates for an advanced degree are admitted to the college each year as nondegree students. Such students are admitted only with the approval of the appropriate academic unit chair and the dean.

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Registration

General Information gives information about registration, adding and dropping courses, transfer from one division of the University to another, and auditing a course. The Course Schedule, published before registration each semester and summer session, includes registration instructions, advising locations, and the times, places, and instructors of classes. The Course Schedule and General Information are published on the World Wide Web and are accessible through the registrar's Web site. General Information is also sold at campus-area bookstores

Enrollment in upper-division courses in the College of Communication may be restricted because of limitations on instructional resources.

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Academic Policies and Procedures

Grammar, Spelling and Punctuation Test

Journalism and public relations majors must earn a passing score of 45 on the College of Communication Grammar, Spelling and Punctuation (GSP) Test as described in the requirements of their major. Students who receive transfer credit for Journalism 315 must also take and pass the test before enrolling in subsequent courses in the major. All students must pass the test before enrolling in courses for which it is a prerequisite.

Students may take the test up to three times. If a journalism student has not passed the test after three trials, the student may enroll in a GSP review class offered each semester by the School of Journalism. The student may take the test a fourth and final time upon completion of the review class. If the student does not pass the test on the fourth trial, he or she may not enroll in any course for which the test is a prerequisite. Public relations majors may take the GSP review class with the permission of the School of Journalism; permission is granted only when space is available. Students whose native language is not English may appeal to the School of Journalism to waive the three-trial limit. Information about test dates is available from Instructional Assessment and Evaluation, 2616 Wichita, and the School of Journalism.

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Honors

Senior Fellows Program

The Senior Fellows Program is a college-wide honors program providing a broad, interdisciplinary supplement to the student's major. The program is designed for students with the talent and interest to go beyond the usual undergraduate experience. Participants who complete four honors courses in communication with a grade of at least B in each earn the distinction of Senior Fellow. The coursework is undertaken in conjunction with the student's degree requirements. Students with a grade point average of at least 3.30 are invited to apply to participate during their junior and/or senior years. Requirements for admission include completion of the formal application process, which includes a written statement of purpose indicating why the student wishes to be part of the program, and an interview with members of the faculty committee that oversees the program. Twenty-five to thirty students are selected for the program each year.

Departmental Honors Programs

Each academic unit in the College of Communication offers an honors program to students majoring in the unit. Requirements for the programs vary, but all include (1) minimum grade point averages for admission to and continuance in the program; (2) three to six semester hours of honors coursework; and (3) completion in residence at the University of at least sixty semester hours of coursework counted toward the degree.

Each academic unit encourages eligible students to apply for admission to the honors program. Students who complete the program receive a certificate indicating "Special Honors in (name of field)." This notation also appears on the student's academic record.

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Advertising Honors Program

Students who plan to seek special honors in advertising should apply to the department undergraduate adviser for admission to the honors program upon completion of sixty semester hours of coursework; they must apply no later than upon completion of ninety semester hours. A University grade point average of at least 3.25 and a grade point average in advertising of at least 3.50 are required for admission. The requirements for graduation with special honors are (1) Advertising 379H, Honors Tutorial Course, with a grade of at least B; (2) a University grade point average of at least 3.25 and a grade point average in advertising of at least 3.50; and (3) completion in residence at the University of at least sixty semester hours of coursework counted toward the degree of Bachelor of Science in Advertising.

Communication Sciences and Disorders Honors Program

Students who plan to seek special honors in communication sciences and disorders should apply to the department undergraduate adviser for admission to the honors program upon completion of ninety semester hours of coursework. A University grade point average of at least 3.00 and a grade point average in communication sciences and disorders of at least 3.50 are required for admission. The requirements for graduation with special honors are (1) Communication Sciences and Disorders 359H, Honors Tutorial Course: Reading, with a grade of at least B; (2) Communication Sciences and Disorders 379H, Honors Tutorial Course: Special Project, with a grade of at least B; (3) a University grade point average of at least 3.00 and a grade point average in communication sciences and disorders of at least 3.50; and (4) completion in residence at the University of at least sixty semester hours of coursework counted toward the degree of Bachelor of Science in Communication Sciences and Disorders.

Communication Studies Honors Program

Students who plan to seek special honors in communication studies should consult the communication studies undergraduate adviser upon completion of seventy-five semester hours of coursework. A University grade point average of at least 3.00 and a grade point average in communication studies of at least 3.50 are required for admission to the honors program. The requirements for graduation with special honors are (1) a major in communication studies; (2) Communication Studies 359H, Honors Tutorial Course: Reading, with a grade of at least B; (3) Communication Studies 379H, Honors Tutorial Course: Special Project, with a grade of at least B; (4) a University grade point average of at least 3.00 and a grade point average in communication studies of at least 3.50; and (5) completion in residence at the University of at least sixty semester hours of coursework counted toward the degree of Bachelor of Science in Communication Studies.

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Journalism Honors Program

Students who plan to seek special honors in journalism should apply to the School of Journalism adviser for admission to the honors program upon completion of sixty semester hours of coursework; they must apply no later than upon completion of ninety semester hours. A University grade point average of at least 3.50 and a grade point average in journalism of at least 3.50 are required for admission. The requirements for graduation with special honors are (1) Journalism 379H, Honors Tutorial Course, with a grade of at least B; (2) a University grade point average of at least 3.50 and a grade point average in journalism of at least 3.50; and (3) completion in residence at the University of at least sixty semester hours of coursework counted toward the degree of Bachelor of Journalism.

Public Relations Honors Program

Students who plan to seek special honors in public relations should apply to the public relations adviser for admission to the honors program upon completion of sixty semester hours of coursework; they must apply no later than upon completion of ninety semester hours. A University grade point average of at least 3.25 and a grade point average in public relations of at least 3.50 are required for admission. The requirements for graduation with special honors are (1) Public Relations 379H, Honors Tutorial Course, with a grade of at least B; (2) a University grade point average of at least 3.25 and a grade point average in public relations of at least 3.50; and (3) completion in residence at the University of at least sixty semester hours of coursework counted toward the degree of Bachelor of Science in Public Relations.

Radio-Television-Film Honors Program

Students who plan to seek special honors in radio-television-film should apply to the department chair for admission to the honors program upon completion of seventy-five semester hours of coursework; they must apply no later than upon completion of ninety semester hours. A University grade point average of at least 3.00 and a grade point average in radio-television-film of at least 3.50 are required for admission to and continuation in the honors program. The requirements for graduation with special honors are (1) two semesters of Radio-Television-Film 378H, Honors Tutorial Course, with a grade of at least B each semester; (2) a University grade point average of at least 3.00 and a grade point average in radio-television-film of at least 3.50; and (3) completion in residence at the University of at least sixty semester hours of coursework counted toward the degree of Bachelor of Science in Radio-Television-Film.

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University Honors

The designation University Honors, awarded at the end of each long-session semester, gives official recognition and commendation to students whose grades for the semester indicate distinguished academic accomplishment. Both the quality and the quantity of work done are considered. Criteria for University Honors are given in chapter 1.

Graduation with University Honors

Students who, upon graduation, have demonstrated outstanding academic achievement are eligible to graduate with University Honors. Criteria for graduation with University Honors are given in chapter 1.

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Communication and Society Concentration

This concentration is designed for consumers and creators of messages in public contexts. It is open only to students in majors outside the College of Communication; any noncommunication student may enroll in any of these courses for which he or she meets the prerequisite. In addition to fulfilling the prerequisite, the student must have a University grade point average of at least 2.25 to enroll in any upper-division course in the College of Communication.

The communication and society concentration requires eighteen semester hours of coursework, consisting of two required courses and twelve hours of electives; nine hours of the elective work must be in upper-division courses. Of the eighteen semester hours required for the concentration, at least twelve must be completed in residence. At any time after enrolling in his or her last concentration course, the student should fill out a concentration completion form in the Office of Student Affairs. The form must be submitted by the deadline to apply for graduation in the student's final semester. Students who complete the concentration will receive verification.

A student who wishes to use the concentration to fulfill minor requirements should make certain these courses meet the requirements of his or her college.

Concentration Courses

Required Courses

  • Communication 309, Communication Technology and Society
  • Radio-Television-Film 305, Introduction to Media Studies

Electives

  • Advertising 315, History and Development of Advertising
  • Communication 316M, Communication and Ethnic Groups
  • Communication Studies 306M, Professional Communication Skills
  • Communication Studies 332K, Theories of Persuasion
  • Communication Studies 342K, Political Communication
  • Journalism 360, Media Law and Ethics
  • Journalism 364E, The Mass Media and Society

United States Latino and Latin American Media Studies Concentration

This concentration is designed to introduce students to United States Latino and Latin American issues in communication and the media and to give them the opportunity to prepare for professional work related to these areas. Completion of the concentration requires twelve semester hours of coursework, consisting of one required course and nine hours of elective work in upper-division courses. Any College of Communication student may enroll in any of the concentration courses for which he or she meets the prerequisite. The student must have a University grade point average of at least 2.25 to enroll in any upper-division course in the college.

The student must submit an application form online to the Office of Student Affairs in order to enroll in the US Latino and Latin American media studies concentration. Certain course prerequisites may be waived once the student completes the concentration application form.

Each degree program in the college imposes a limit on the number of hours in the college that may be counted toward the degree; each also imposes limits on the number of hours in the major that may be counted. For students who complete the US Latino and Latin American media studies concentration, these limits may be modified with the approval of the Office of Student Affairs.

Students should consult the Office of Student Affairs for additional information about the program and the coursework that meets concentration requirements. The courses that may be counted toward this concentration include, but are not limited to, the following.

Concentration Courses

Required Course

  • Communication 316M, Communication and Ethnic Groups or Radio-Television-Film 316M, Communication and Ethnic Groups

Electives

  • Advertising 334, International Advertising
  • Advertising 378, Topic: Advertising in Multicultural Markets
  • Journalism 340C, Topic 1: Mass Media and Minorities
  • Journalism 349T, Topic 4: International Reporting
  • Journalism 367E, Journalism in Latin America
  • Radio-Television-Film 359S, Topic: Brazilian Media and Culture
  • Radio-Television-Film 365, Topic: Race, Class, and Media

Courses for Teacher Preparation

The college does not currently offer a teaching certification program for any of its degrees. Students wishing to pursue teacher certification should consult the teacher certification officer in the College of Education.

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Undergraduate Catalog | 2006-2008
College of Communication
page 1 of 8 in Chapter 4
« prev | next »
College of Communication Office of the Registrar University of Texas at Austin copyright 2006
Official Publications 15 Aug 2006