College of Liberal Arts Office of the Registrar University of Texas at Austin
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Undergraduate Catalog | 2006-2008
College of Liberal Arts
page 5 of 41 in Chapter 10
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Degrees

The College of Liberal Arts offers three degree programs: the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I; the Bachelor of Arts, Plan II; and the Bachelor of Science in Psychology.

The requirements of the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I, begin below. For this degree students may major in any of the departments of the College of Liberal Arts or the College of Natural Sciences; these majors are listed in chapter 1.

The Bachelor of Arts, Plan II, a broad liberal arts honors program for outstanding students, is described in this chapter.

The Bachelor of Science in Psychology is designed to offer students a more extensive scientific program than the Bachelor of Arts with a major in psychology. The requirements for the BSPsy are given in this chapter.

A student may not earn more than one Bachelor of Arts degree from the University. A student may not earn both the Bachelor of Arts with a major in psychology and the Bachelor of Science in Psychology. A student may not earn both the Bachelor of Arts with an intercollege major in kinesiology and health and the Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology.

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Program in Comparative Literature

The program in comparative literature approaches the study of literature from a variety of viewpoints rather than from the viewpoint of a single language or nation. Courses in literary history, practical criticism, and critical theory stress the relationship between literature and other disciplines in the humanities, the arts, and the social sciences. The program offers both the doctoral and the master's degree and sponsors courses on both the graduate and the undergraduate level. All comparative literature courses are conducted in English.

To introduce undergraduates to the field of study, the comparative literature faculty has designed a cluster of courses in critical thinking and world literature. These courses concentrate on writing and thinking critically, with a focus on literary texts drawn from around the world, in the context of an interdisciplinary and international program. The twelve-hour cluster complements many majors in liberal arts; with the approval of the student's major department, it may be used to fulfill the minor requirement. More information is available from the comparative literature program.

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Applicability of Certain Courses

Physical Activity Courses

Physical activity (PED) courses and Kinesiology 119 may not be counted toward a degree in the College of Liberal Arts. However, they are counted as courses for which the student is enrolled, and the grades are included in the grade point average.

ROTC Courses

ROTC units are maintained on campus by the Departments of Air Force Science, Military Science, and Naval Science. For information about each program, consult the chair of the department concerned.

Nine semester hours of designated University of Texas at Austin coursework in air force science, military science, or naval science may be counted toward any degree in the College of Liberal Arts. In general, this credit may be used only as electives or to fulfill the substantial writing component requirement. However, cross-listed courses may be used as appropriate to fulfill other degree requirements. A list of approved ROTC courses is available in the Office of the Dean, Student Division.

Internship Courses

No more than six semester hours of credit earned in internship courses may be counted toward a single major in the College of Liberal Arts.

No more than nine semester hours of credit earned in internship courses may be counted toward a degree in the College of Liberal Arts.

Bible Courses

Bible courses may be counted as lower-division electives in College of Liberal Arts degree programs that have room for such electives. No more than twelve semester hours of Bible courses may be counted toward any degree offered by the University.

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Admission Deficiencies

Students admitted to the University with deficiencies in high school units must remove them by the means prescribed in General Information. Contact the dean's office for further information.

Correspondence and Extension Courses

Credit that a University student in residence earns simultaneously by correspondence or extension from the University or elsewhere or in residence at another school will not be counted toward a degree in the College of Liberal Arts unless specifically approved in advance by the dean. In very special circumstances, the dean may allow a student in residence to take one or more courses by extension or correspondence. No more than 30 percent of the semester hours required for any degree offered in the College of Liberal Arts may be taken by correspondence. For additional information about correspondence work by resident students, see General Information.

Courses Taken on the Pass/Fail Basis

No more than sixteen semester hours taken on the pass/fail basis may be counted toward the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I, or the Bachelor of Science in Psychology; no more than nineteen semester hours taken on the pass/fail basis may be counted toward the Bachelor of Arts, Plan II. In general, only electives may be taken on the pass/fail basis. Complete rules on registration on the pass/fail basis are given in General Information.

Courses in a Single Field

No more than thirty-six hours may be counted in any one subject, including the major, unless major requirements state otherwise. No more than thirty-six hours may be counted in any one college or school other than the College of Liberal Arts or the College of Natural Sciences.

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Bachelor of Arts, Plan I

The requirements for the Bachelor of Arts under Plan I are designed to give each student flexibility in the selection of courses to meet individual needs.

Summary of the Bachelor of Arts Degree, Plan I

The following is a brief overview of the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I; for detailed regulations see "Degree Requirements, Specific."

A total of 120 semester hours is required for the degree. Of the 120 hours, thirty-six must be in upper-division courses. At least sixty hours, including eighteen hours of upper-division coursework, and at least twenty-four of the last thirty hours must be taken in residence at the University. Provided residence rules are met, credit may be earned by examination, by extension, by correspondence (up to 30 percent of the hours required for the degree), or, with the approval of the dean, by work transferred from another institution. A maximum of sixteen semester hours of classroom and/or correspondence coursework may be taken on the pass/fail basis.

Three categories of work must be completed: prescribed work, major and minor requirements, and electives to provide a total of 120 semester hours.

Prescribed Work

For all majors for the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I, there are four specific area requirements that make up about half of the degree program:

Area A, Language and Literature: Three semester hours of rhetoric and writing and three of English are required. In addition, each student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component. One of these courses must be upper-division. The foreign language requirement is the attainment of a certain proficiency as well as the completion of a specified number of courses; the actual number of hours varies with the language selected and with previous knowledge of the language.

Area B, Social Sciences: Eighteen semester hours must be completed, including courses in four subjects. Of these eighteen hours, six hours must be in American history and six hours must be in American government, including Texas government.

Area C, Natural Sciences: Eighteen semester hours are required, including three hours of mathematics. No more than nine of the eighteen hours may be in any one subject. Lists of courses that may be used to fulfill this requirement are available in the Student Division.

Area D, General Culture: Six semester hours are required. Lists of courses that may be used to fulfill this requirement are available in the Student Division.

Courses in the major and minor may be used to fulfill area requirements unless expressly prohibited. A course taken to meet the requirements of one area may not also be used to fulfill the requirements of another area. The only exception to this rule is that a course taken to fulfill another area requirement may also fulfill the requirement for courses having a substantial writing component, if the course is so certified. No courses used to fulfill area requirements may be taken on the pass/fail basis.

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Major

Each candidate must select a major. The number of semester hours required in the major varies with the field selected. Some majors require specific courses in other subjects as well. At least eighteen hours of coursework in the major, including six hours of upper-division coursework, must be completed in residence at the University.

Minor

To complete the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I, students in most majors must also choose a minor. General requirements are given in "Majors and Minors" in this chapter. Specific requirements for a minor are listed with each set of major requirements.

Electives

The remaining coursework needed for the required total of 120 semester hours consists of electives. A maximum of sixteen hours of elective coursework may be taken on the pass/fail basis.

Degree Requirements, Specific

Specific requirements for the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I, are divided into four areas: A, B, C, and D. Interdepartmental courses and credit by examination may be used to meet these requirements. Courses in the major and minor may be used to fulfill area requirements unless expressly prohibited. A course taken to meet the requirements of one area may not also be used to fulfill the requirements of another area; the only exception to this rule is that a course taken to fulfill another area requirement may also be used to fulfill the requirement for courses having a substantial writing component, if the course is so certified. No courses used to fulfill area requirements may be taken on the pass/fail basis.

In addition to the following requirements, the student must fulfill the University requirements for graduation given in chapter 1 and the requirements of the College of Liberal Arts given in this chapter.

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Prescribed Work

Area A, Language and Literature

English composition and literature: Rhetoric and Writing 306 and English 316K.

Writing: In addition to Rhetoric and Writing 306 and English 316K, each student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component. One of these courses must be upper-division; both must be taken for a letter grade. Courses used to fulfill the writing requirement may be used simultaneously to fulfill other area requirements or major requirements, unless otherwise specified. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.

Foreign language: Students must complete four semesters in a single foreign language.

The foreign language requirement is the attainment of a certain proficiency, as well as the completion of a specified number of courses; however, the courses taken to gain this proficiency are not electives and may not be taken on the pass/fail basis. Any part of the requirement may be fulfilled by credit by examination. Students may accelerate their progress at any point in the sequence by means of credit by examination.

To achieve proficiency in a foreign language as rapidly as possible, qualified students are urged to take advantage of the intensive foreign language study program. Information about this program is available from the appropriate language department. Courses used to fulfill the foreign language requirement must be language courses; literature-in-translation courses, for example, may not be counted.

Area B, Social Sciences

Eighteen semester hours, distributed among at least four of the following fields of study. Courses in social sciences not listed may be used if approved by the dean. None of the courses used to fulfill Area B requirements may be taken on the pass/fail basis. Courses in anthropology, geography, linguistics, and psychology used to fulfill Area B requirements may not also be used to fulfill Area C requirements.

  1. Six hours in each of the following fields of study:
    1. American government, including Texas government
    2. American history
  2. Three hours each from any two of the following fields of study:
    1. Anthropology
    2. Economics
    3. Geography
    4. Linguistics
    5. Psychology
    6. Sociology
Area C, Natural Sciences

Each student must have credit for three semester hours in a course offered by the University of Texas at Austin Department of Mathematics, excluding Mathematics 301, 316K, and 316L. Algebra courses at the level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the Area C requirement or toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics 301 or 303D without degree credit to remove their deficiency.

Fifteen additional semester hours, with no more than nine in any one department, from the fields of study listed below. No more than nine hours of mathematics and computer sciences combined may be included in these fifteen hours. Nine of these fifteen hours must be taken in courses in the College of Natural Sciences and the Jackson School of Geosciences, items 1 through 10 below, with at least six hours taken in one subject from items 1 through 8; these nine hours may include no more than three hours of mathematics or computer sciences. The remaining six hours may be chosen from courses in the natural sciences listed below or from the list of approved alternative courses in subjects 11 through 16 that is available in the Student Division and at http://www.utexas.edu/cola/degree_plans/area_requirements/. Of these six hours, a maximum of three semester hours in courses in either the history of science or the philosophy of science may be used.

A course listed in two or more departments may be used as a course in only one department in fulfilling requirements under Area C. Courses in anthropology, geography, linguistics, and psychology used to fulfill Area C requirements may not also be used to fulfill Area B requirements. Courses in philosophy used to fulfill Area C requirements may not also be used to fulfill Area D requirements.

  1. Astronomy
  2. Biology
  3. Chemistry
  4. Geological sciences
  5. Marine science
  6. Nutrition
  7. Physical science
  8. Physics
  9. Mathematics
  10. Computer sciences
  11. Experimental psychology
  12. Physical anthropology
  13. Physical geography
  14. Philosophy (courses in logic)
  15. History of science and philosophy of science
  16. Other science courses approved by the dean

Students should confer with their departmental advisers or with counselors in the Student Division to determine which courses are included in items 11 through 16.

Students, counselors, and advisers are urged to make careful selection of Area C courses in order to develop a meaningful pattern and a coherent sequence.

Area D, General Culture

Six semester hours from the fields of study listed below. Three of these six hours must be chosen from subarea 1, 2, 3, or 4 (excluding courses in logic).

A student who uses Greek or Latin to meet the foreign language requirement may use additional coursework in the same language to meet the Area D requirement, but only courses beyond the fourth semester proficiency level may be used.

  1. Architecture
  2. Classics, including classical civilization, Greek, Latin
  3. Fine arts, including art history, design, ensemble, fine arts, instruments, music, studio art, theatre and dance, visual art studies
  4. Philosophy
  5. Other courses that emphasize the topics listed above, if approved by the Office of the Dean. A list of approved alternatives is available in the Student Division.
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Special Requirements

Elective Requirements and Limitations

In addition to the area requirements given above and the major requirements given in the section "Majors and Minors," the student must take enough elective coursework to complete the 120 semester hours required for the degree. These 120 hours may include no more than twelve hours of Bible; nine hours of designated coursework in air force science, military science, or naval science; sixteen hours taken on the pass/fail basis; thirty-six hours in any one subject offered in the College of Liberal Arts or the College of Natural Sciences, unless major requirements state otherwise; and thirty-six hours in courses offered in any other single college or school of the University.

Minimum Scholastic Requirements

The student must earn a grade point average of at least 2.00 in all courses taken at the University of Texas at Austin (including credit by examination, correspondence, and extension) for which a grade or symbol other than Q, W, X, or CR is recorded; in addition, the student must earn a grade point average of at least 2.00 in courses taken at the University and counted toward the major requirement. The student should also refer to the description of his or her major program in the section "Majors and Minors," since some majors include higher minimum scholastic requirements.

For more information about grades and the grade point average, see General Information.

Concentrations

Within the general requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Arts and the requirements of the major, a student may also complete a concentration in one of the following programs offered by the College of Liberal Arts.

Courses required for a concentration may also be counted toward the requirements of the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I, if applicable. Students in other degree programs and colleges should check with their dean's offices about course applicability and restrictions.

Cultural Studies

The concentration in cultural studies allows students to pursue a program of interdisciplinary specialization in addition to the major. Students who wish to enter the cultural studies concentration should consult the undergraduate adviser in the Américo Paredes Center for Cultural Studies.

The concentration in cultural studies is designed to complement the student's major, with courses drawn from the humanities, the social sciences, and the arts. With the approval of his or her dean and the cultural studies adviser, a student outside the College of Liberal Arts may complete a concentration in cultural studies. The student must fulfill the following requirements:

  1. Completion of the requirements of a major.
  2. Two of the following courses: Anthropology 305, English 325K, Anthropology 325L or English 325L, Mexican American Studies 307, Communication 309, Radio-Television-Film 314, Music 342, Theatre and Dance 357T.
  3. Cultural Studies 340.
  4. Three additional courses from a group of cultural studies–related courses prescribed by the Cultural Studies Curriculum Committee.
  5. Two additional courses from a group of supporting courses prescribed by the Cultural Studies Curriculum Committee.
Science, Technology, and Society

The goal of this concentration is to prepare students to use emerging technologies humanely and critically; to participate thoughtfully in public discourse about new scientific and technological innovation; and to understand the consequences of public and private decisions about scientific advancements and technologies. The concentration is designed to allow students to gain experience in analyzing historical, philosophical, rhetorical, economic, political, aesthetic, and scientific practices and methods of inquiry. Students have the opportunity to explore the social impacts of rapid scientific and technological change. The program integrates approaches from the liberal arts, social sciences, and humanities with new developments in science and technology. The science, technology, and society concentration focuses on several key areas, including nanotechnology, gaming, collaborative work and work-life, education, health care, and computer-mediated communication.

The program of study is designed to complement the major by helping the student to gain a richer and more profound understanding of the dynamic relationships among science, technology, culture, and the individual. The concentration is open to liberal arts majors and, with the approval of their deans, to students in other colleges and schools.

The student must fulfill the following requirements.

  1. A departmental major or the equivalent.
  2. Eighteen semester hours of coursework, consisting of Science, Technology, and Society 319 and 331; nine hours of related coursework; and a capstone seminar, Science, Technology, and Society 360. A list of related courses that will fulfill this requirement is available from the science, technology, and society adviser; courses that are not on the list may be used with written consent of the adviser.
Western Civilization and American Institutions

The concentration in western civilization and American institutions is designed to complement departmental specialization with an integrated sequence of courses that emphasizes a multidisciplinary approach to the major ideas of western civilization and their impact on the development of the institutions of the United States. Students who wish to enter the concentration should consult the faculty adviser. With the approval of his or her dean and the western civilization and American institutions adviser, a student outside the College of Liberal Arts may complete a concentration in western civilization and American institutions.

The student must fulfill the following requirements.

  1. Completion of the requirements of a major.
  2. Three semester hours of Government 335M, Topics in Political Thought, chosen from a list of topics approved by the western civilization and American institutions faculty adviser.
  3. Fifteen additional semester hours of coursework in western civilization and American institutions, chosen in consultation with the faculty adviser for the concentration, from a list prescribed by the western civilization and American institutions faculty committee.
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Undergraduate Catalog | 2006-2008
College of Liberal Arts
page 5 of 41 in Chapter 10
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College of Liberal Arts Office of the Registrar University of Texas at Austin copyright 2006
Official Publications 15 Aug 2006