College of Liberal Arts Office of the Registrar University of Texas at Austin
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Undergraduate Catalog | 2006-2008
College of Liberal Arts
page 14 of 41 in Chapter 10
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Department of Classics

Unless otherwise stated below, each course meets for three class hours a week for one semester.

AHC | Ancient History and Classical Civilization

Lower-Division Courses

310. Introductory Surveys in Premodern History. Introductory survey of premodern history with emphasis on regions outside of the ancient Mediterranean world. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

319. Introductory Surveys in Roman and Greek History. Three lecture hours or two lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Topic 1: The Ancient Mediterranean World. Same as Classical Civilization 319D and History 319D. Survey of the ancient Mediterranean from ca. 3000 bc to ad 476. Focus on the development of ideas and institutions in the Greek and Roman worlds and on the active cultural exchange among the diverse civilizations of the broader region that shaped Greek and Roman history and cultural identity.

119S, 219S, 319S, 419S, 519S, 619S, 719S, 819S, 919S. Topics in Ancient History. This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Center for Global Educational Opportunities. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the ancient history and classical civilization program. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

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Upper-Division Courses

325. Topics in Ancient History. Topics in the history of the Greek and Roman empires and the surrounding area. Three lecture hours or two lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: The History of Rome: The Republic. Same as History 321M. A survey of Roman history from the founding of Rome to the death of Julius Caesar. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

Topic 2: The History of Rome: The Empire. Same as History 321. A survey of the Roman world from Augustus to Constantine the Great. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

Topic 3: Rome and Jerusalem. Same as History 321G, Jewish Studies 365 (Topic 7: Rome and Jerusalem), Middle Eastern Studies 320 (Topic 2: Rome and Jerusalem), and Religious Studies 365 (Topic 1: Rome and Jerusalem). A study of daily life in Israel during the Roman period, focusing on Jerusalem, ancient Palestinian synagogues and churches, Jewish and Christian symbolism, agriculture, warfare, and burial practices. Only one of the following may be counted: Ancient History and Classical Civilization 325 (Topic 3), Jewish Studies 361 (Topic 2: Rome and Jerusalem), Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures 341 (Topic 7: Rome and Jerusalem), Religious Studies 361 (Topic 24: Rome and Jerusalem). Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

Topic 4: History of Greece to the End of the Peloponnesian War. Same as Classical Civilization 354C and History 354C. Survey of Greek history from the emergence of the city-states through the end of the Peloponnesian War (ca. 700 to 404 bc). Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

Topic 5: History of Greece to 146 bc. Same as Classical Civilization 354D and History 354D. Survey of Greek history from the end of the Peloponnesian War to the defeat of Greece by Rome (404 to 146 bc). Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

Topic 6: The Hellenistic Age: Alexander to Actium. Same as Classical Civilization 351D and History 351D. History of Asia, Egypt, and the Mediterranean world from Alexander's expedition to Asia to Rome's defeat of the last of the Hellenistic monarchs at Actium (ca. 334 to 31 bc). Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

129S, 229S, 329S, 429S, 529S, 629S, 729S, 829S, 929S. Topics in Ancient History. This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Center for Global Educational Opportunities. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the ancient history and classical civilization program. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

330. Topics in Premodern History. Topics in premodern history with emphasis on regions outside of the ancient Mediterranean world. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

378. Undergraduate Seminar in Ancient History. Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of ancient history. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; and a major in ancient history and classical civilization, classical civilization, Greek, or Latin, or consent of instructor. Additional prerequisites vary with the topic and are given in the Course Schedule.

679H. Honors Tutorial Course. Supervised conference course for honors candidates in ancient history and classical civilization. Three conference hours a week for two semesters. Prerequisite: For 679HA, upper-division standing and admission to the Ancient History and Classical Civilization Honors Program; for 679HB, Ancient History and Classical Civilization 679HA.

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C C | Classical Civilization

No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required for courses in classical civilization. These courses may not be counted toward fulfillment of any foreign language requirement.

Lower-Division Courses

301. Introduction to Ancient Greece. Greatness of Greece as reflected in Greek history, literature, philosophy, art, religion, and politics. No knowledge of Greek is required. Three class hours a week for one semester. Classical Civilization 301 and 342 may not both be counted.

302. Introduction to Ancient Rome. Survey of the highlights and the influence of Roman civilization. No knowledge of Latin is required. Three class hours a week for one semester. Classical Civilization 302 and 347 may not both be counted.

302K. Introduction to Archaeological Studies II: Classical Archaeology. Same as Archaeology 302. Introduction to the archaeological study of the Mediterranean world from the beginnings of writing and complex urban civilizations to the fall of Rome. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. Three class hours a week for one semester.

303. Introduction to Classical Mythology. Survey of major Greek and Roman myths and their influence on literature, art, and music. Three class hours a week for one semester. Classical Civilization 303 and 352 may not both be counted.

304C. Topics in the Ancient World. An introductory survey of the highlights of Greek and Roman civilization and early Christianity. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Classical Civilization 304C and 348 may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Topic 1: Introduction to Greek Private Life.

Topic 2: Paganism to Christianity: An Introduction.

Topic 3: Introduction to Ancient Egypt. A survey of the language, culture, and history of Egypt from the prehistorical period (13,000 bc) to the New Kingdom (1069 bc). Classical Civilization 304C (Topic 3) and 348 (Topic 11: Ancient Egypt) may not both be counted.

305. Topics in Roman Civilization. A survey of the social life and customs of ancient Rome and Pompeii. No knowledge of Latin is required. Three class hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Classical Civilization 305 and 335 may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Topic 1: Introduction to Caesar and Augustus.

Topic 2: Introduction to Roman Private Life.

306. Introduction to the Latin and Greek Element in English. The systematic study of the Latin and Greek elements in the English vocabulary with a view to increasing the student's facility and authority in English. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. Three class hours a week for one semester. Classical Civilization 306 and 336 may not both be counted.

306M. Introduction to Medical and Scientific Terminology. A systematic study of medical and scientific terminology based on Greek and Latin roots. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. Classical Civilization 306M and 336M may not both be counted.

307K. Topics in Archaeology. Survey of archaeological discoveries about ancient Greece in their historical and cultural context; emphasis on the major sites and monuments of architecture and art. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. Three class hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Classical Civilization 307K and 340 may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Topic 1: Greek Archaeology Survey. A survey of the artifacts, monuments, and sites of classical Greece; their value for documenting ancient Greek religious, social, and cultural history.

318. The Rise of Christianity. Same as Religious Studies 318. Introduction to the origins and development of Christianity. Classical Civilization 318 and Religious Studies 311 (Topic: The Rise of Christianity) may not both be counted.

319D. The Ancient Mediterranean World. Same as Ancient History and Classical Civilization 319 (Topic 1: The Ancient Mediterranean World) and History 319D. Survey of the ancient Mediterranean from ca. 3000 bc to ad 476. Focus on the development of ideas and institutions in the Greek and Roman worlds and on the active cultural exchange among the diverse civilizations of the broader region that shaped Greek and Roman history and cultural identity. Three lecture hours or two lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester.

119S, 219S, 319S, 419S, 519S, 619S, 719S, 819S, 919S. Topics in Classical Civilization. This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Center for Global Educational Opportunities. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Classics. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

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Upper-Division Courses

322. Classical Literature in Translation. Survey of Greek and Latin philosophical, literary, and historical classics, in translation. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. Three class hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. May be counted as an upper-division elective in English. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

Topic 3: Wit and Humor in Antiquity.

327. Parageography. Survey of the classical and medieval roots of speculative literature, especially those fantasies that involve the creation and presentation of imaginary places, lands, and worlds. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

328. Advanced Parageography. The parageographical ploys of Ovid in his Metamorphoses; the deliberate fragmentation of an idea by Dante in his Purgatorio; the highly idiosyncratic Europe of Ariosto's Orlando Furioso. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and Classical Civilization 327, or consent of instructor.

129S, 229S, 329S, 429S, 529S, 629S, 729S, 829S, 929S. Topics in Classical Civilization. This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Center for Global Educational Opportunities. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Classics. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

330K. Ancient Philosophy after Aristotle. Same as Philosophy 330K. Epicureans, Stoics, Skeptics, Plotinus and the Neoplatonist tradition. No knowledge of Greek is required. Three class hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Six semester hours of coursework in philosophy.

335. Advanced Topics in Roman Civilization. No knowledge of Latin is required. Three class hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Classical Civilization 305 and 335 may not both be counted unless the topics vary. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

Topic 1: Caesar and Augustus.

Topic 2: Roman Private Life.

336. The Latin and Greek Element in English. The systematic study of the Latin and Greek elements in the English vocabulary with a view to increasing the student's facility and authority in English. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. Three class hours a week for one semester. Classical Civilization 306 and 336 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

336M. Medical and Scientific Terminology. A systematic study of medical and scientific terminology based on Greek and Latin roots. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. Classical Civilization 306M and 336M may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

340. Advanced Topics in Archaeology. Survey or detailed consideration of a single topic such as architecture, sculpture, or topography of sites. No knowledge of Greek is required. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Classical Civilization 307K and 340 may not both be counted unless the topics vary. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: Greek Archaeology Survey. A survey of the artifacts, monuments, and sites of classical Greece; their value for documenting ancient Greek religious, social, and cultural history. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

Topic 2: Roman Imperial Art. Same as Art History 327N. Public art of the Roman Empire from Augustus to late antiquity, ca. 31 bc to ad 350. Prerequisite: For art history majors, Art History 302; for visual art studies majors, Art History 302 and 303; for others, at least one of the following is advisable but not required: Art History 301, 302, 303.

Topic 3: Greek Architecture. The architecture of mainland Greece, Asia Minor, and Sicily from the Dark Ages to the end of the Hellenistic period (ca. 1000 to 30 bc), with emphasis on public buildings, both religious and secular. Prerequisite: For art history and visual art studies majors, Art History 302 and 303; for others, at least one of the following is advisable but not required: Art History 301, 302, 303.

Topic 4: Roman Architecture. Prerequisite: For art history and visual art studies majors, Art History 302 and 303; for others, at least one of the following is advisable but not required: Art History 301, 302, 303.

Topic 5: Hellenistic Art and Architecture. Art of the Hellenistic period from the reign of Alexander the Great to the beginning of the Roman Empire, ca. 336 to 31 bc. Prerequisite: For art history and visual art studies majors, Art History 302 and 303; for others, at least one of the following is advisable but not required: Art History 301, 302, 303.

342. Ancient Greece. An introductory survey of the highlights of Greek civilization. Three class hours a week for one semester. Classical Civilization 301 and 342 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

347. The Cultural History of Rome. Survey of the highlights and the influence of Roman civilization. No knowledge of Latin is required. Three class hours a week for one semester. Classical Civilization 302 and 347 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

348. Topics in Ancient Civilization. The development and progress of ancient civilization, including history, philosophy, literature, and culture. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. Three lecture hours a week for one semester; additional hours may be required for some topics. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Classical Civilization 304C and 348 may not both be counted unless the topics vary. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 3: Greek Private Life. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

Topic 4: History of Ancient Philosophy. Same as Philosophy 329K. Development of Western philosophy from the pre-Socratics to the early Christian era; emphasis on Plato and Aristotle. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Six semester hours of coursework in philosophy.

Topic 5: Homosexuality in Antiquity. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

Topic 6: Paganism to Christianity. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

Topic 7: Women in Classical Antiquity. Same as Women's and Gender Studies 345 (Topic 9: Women in Classical Antiquity).

Topic 8: German and English: Historical Perspectives. Same as Anthropology 320L (Topic 8: German and English: Historical Perspectives), Germanic Civilization 327E (Topic 9: German and English: Historical Perspectives), and Linguistics 373 (Topic 8: German and English: Historical Perspectives). Only one of the following may be counted: Anthropology 320L (Topic 9: The German Language: Historical Perspectives), Classical Civilization 348 (Topic 8), 348 (Topic 9: The German Language: Historical Perspectives), German 369 (Topic 4: The German Language: Historical Perspectives), Linguistics 373 (Topic 9: The German Language: Historical Perspectives). Prerequisite: For English majors, completion of at least thirty semester hours of coursework, including English 316K or the equivalent; for others, upper-division standing.

Topic 9: The German Language: Historical Perspectives. Same as Anthropology 320L (Topic 9: The German Language: Historical Perspectives), German 369 (Topic 4: The German Language: Historical Perspectives), and Linguistics 373 (Topic 9: The German Language: Historical Perspectives). Only one of the following may be counted: Anthropology 320L (Topic 8: German and English: Historical Perspectives), Classical Civilization 348 (Topic 8: German and English: Historical Perspectives), 348 (Topic 9), Germanic Civilization 327E (Topic 9: German and English: Historical Perspectives), Linguistics 373 (Topic 8: German and English: Historical Perspectives). Prerequisite: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in German, or fourteen hours of coursework in German and six hours of coursework in linguistics.

Topic 10: Jesus in History and Tradition. Same as Religious Studies 335. Critical issues, scholarly debates, and historical methods in studying the development of the Christian tradition regarding the figure of Jesus. Classical Civilization 348 (Topic 10) and Religious Studies 361 (Topic: Jesus in History and Tradition) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

Topic 11: Ancient Egypt. Discussion of Egypt's culture, language, and history from the prehistorical period (13,000 BC) to the New Kingdom (1069 BC). Classical Civilization 304C (Topic 3: Introduction to Ancient Egypt) and 348 (Topic 11) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

351D. The Hellenistic Age: Alexander to Actium. Same as Ancient History and Classical Civilization 325 (Topic 6: The Hellenistic Age: Alexander to Actium) and History 351D. History of Asia, Egypt, and the Mediterranean world from Alexander's expedition to Asia to Rome's defeat of the last of the Hellenistic monarchs at Actium (ca. 334 to 31 bc). Two lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

352. Classical Mythology. Survey of major Greek and Roman myths and their influence on literature, art, and music. Three class hours a week for one semester. Classical Civilization 303 and 352 may not both be counted. May be counted as an upper-division elective in English. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

354C. History of Greece to the End of the Peloponnesian War. Same as Ancient History and Classical Civilization 325 (Topic 4: History of Greece to the End of the Peloponnesian War) and History 354C. Survey of Greek history from the emergence of the city-states through the end of the Peloponnesian War (ca. 700 to 404 bc). Two lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

354D. History of Greece to 146 BC. Same as Ancient History and Classical Civilization 325 (Topic 5: History of Greece to 146 bc) and History 354D. Survey of Greek history from the end of the Peloponnesian War to the defeat of Greece by Rome (404 to 146 bc). Two lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

362. Conference Course in Classical Archaeology. Advanced archaeological instruction and research in classical archaeology. No knowledge of Greek is required. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and consent of instructor.

363. Conference Course in Classical Civilization. Supervised work in various specialized aspects of classical civilization. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and consent of instructor.

679H. Honors Tutorial Course. Supervised conference course for honors candidates in classics. Three conference hours a week for two semesters. Prerequisite: For 679HA, upper-division standing and admission to the Classics Honors Program; for 679HB, Classical Civilization 679HA.

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GK | Greek

Unless otherwise indicated, all Greek courses are ancient Greek (including New Testament Greek).

The information in parentheses after a course number is the Texas Common Course Numbering (TCCN) designation. Only TCCN designations that are exact semester-hour equivalents of University courses are listed here. Additional TCCN information is given in Appendix A.

Lower-Division Courses

502. First-Year Modern Greek I: Grammar and Reading. Five class hours a week for one semester.

503. First-Year Modern Greek II: Grammar and Reading. Five class hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Greek 502 or consent of instructor.

804. Intensive First-Year Greek. An accelerated course for highly motivated students that combines the material covered in Greek 506 with that covered in the first part of Greek 507. Offered in the summer session as part of the Intensive Greek Program. The Intensive Greek Program meets for five hours each weekday during the summer session. Only one of the following may be counted: Greek 804; 506 and 507; 606Q. The student must complete both courses in order to earn credit for either; the same grade will be awarded for both courses. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Greek 412. Students who enroll in 804 must take Greek 412 in the same summer session.

506 (TCCN: GREE 1511). First-Year Greek I. Five class hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Greek 804; 506 and 507; 606Q.

606Q. Accelerated First-Year Greek. Comparable to Greek 506 and 507 together. Designed primarily for students of high academic ability and motivation. Six class hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Greek 804; 506 and 507; 606Q. Prerequisite: Knowledge of another foreign or classical language is desirable.

507 (TCCN: GREE 1512). First-Year Greek II. Completion of grammar, and some reading from Plato and other writers. Five class hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Greek 804; 506 and 507; 606Q. Greek 507 and 412 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Greek 506 with a grade of at least C.

309K. Conference Course. Supervised individual instruction in second-year ancient or modern Greek reading. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

310. Second-Year Modern Greek I. Culture, language, and literature of present-day Greece. Three class hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Greek 503 or consent of instructor.

310K. Second-Year Modern Greek II. Continuation of Greek 310. Three class hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Greek 310 or consent of instructor.

311 (TCCN: GREE 2311). Second-Year Greek I: Prose and Poetry. Selections from standard writers such as Plato, Euripides, and Xenophon. Three class hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Greek 606Q or 507 with a grade of at least C, 804 and 412 with a grade of at least C in each, or consent of the undergraduate adviser.

412. Intensive Greek. An accelerated course for highly motivated students. Completion of this course is equivalent to completion of Greek 506 and 507. Students who enroll in 412 must take Greek 804 in the same summer session. A grade of A may allow the student to advance to Greek 324 with consent of the Greek 324 instructor. The Intensive Greek Program meets for five hours each weekday during the summer session. Greek 507 and 412 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Greek 804.

312K. Second-Year Greek II: Selected Writers. Continuation of Greek 311. Selections from standard, classical, non-biblical writers. Three class hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Greek 311 with a grade of at least C, or consent of the undergraduate adviser.

312L. Second-Year Greek II: Selections from Biblical Greek. Continuation of Greek 311. A parallel to Greek 312K with a focus on biblical Greek. Three class hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Greek 311 with a grade of at least C, or consent of the undergraduate adviser.

119S, 219S, 319S, 419S, 519S, 619S, 719S, 819S, 919S. Topics in Greek. This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Center for Global Educational Opportunities. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Classics. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

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Upper-Division Courses

324. Greek Literature: Junior Reading. Readings from major writers such as Homer, Euripides, and Lysias. Three class hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Greek 312K (or 319) with a grade of at least C, or Greek 804 and 412 with a grade of A in each; and consent of instructor or the undergraduate adviser.

Topic 1: Euripides.

Topic 2: Herodotus.

Topic 3: Homer's Iliad.

Topic 4: Plato.

326. Advanced Greek Grammar and Composition. Three class hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Greek 324 or consent of the undergraduate adviser.

328. Biblical Greek: Junior Reading. Acts of the Apostles, Pauline Epistles, the Gospels of John and Luke, the Septuagint, related writings and critical exegesis. Three class hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Greek 328 and 362 may not both be counted unless the topics vary. Prerequisite: Greek 312K or 312L (or 319); and consent of instructor.

Topic 1: Pauline Epistles.

Topic 2: The Gospel of John.

129S, 229S, 329S, 429S, 529S, 629S, 729S, 829S, 929S. Topics in Greek. This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Center for Global Educational Opportunities. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Classics. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

362. Advanced Biblical Greek. Readings from the Septuagint, Christian fathers, and Greek papyri; comparison with New Testament Greek and Homeric and Attic Greek. Textual criticism. Three class hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Greek 328 and 362 may not both be counted unless the topics vary. Prerequisite: Greek 324 or 328.

Topic 1: Pauline Epistles.

Topic 2: The Gospel of John.

365. Advanced Greek Reading. Readings from major writers such as Thucydides, Demosthenes, Aeschylus, Pindar, and the Lyric Poets. Three class hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Greek 324 or consent of the undergraduate adviser.

Topic 1: Aeschylus.

Topic 2: Sophocles.

Topic 3: Thucydides.

Topic 4: Aristophanes.

370. Advanced Conference Course. Supervised reading. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Greek 310K or 324, and consent of instructor.

679H. Honors Tutorial Course. Supervised conference course for honors candidates in Greek. Three conference hours a week for two semesters. Prerequisite: For 679HA, upper-division standing and admission to the honors program in Greek; for 679HB, Greek 679HA.

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LAT | Latin

Generally, students beginning Latin should follow the regular sequence: Latin 506, 507, 311, and 312K or 312M or 316. However, advanced and graduate students and students with a strong linguistic background should follow the accelerated sequence: Latin 506Q or 508, followed by 511K if they earn a grade of A in 506Q or 508. Students with high school or transfer credit usually begin University coursework at a higher level. For instance, students with two high school units in Latin ordinarily take Latin 508 or 311; those with three units begin with Latin 311; those with four units begin with Latin 312K, 312M, or 316.

To ensure proper placement, students should consult the undergraduate adviser for the Department of Classics before registering. A great deal of flexibility is sometimes allowed on course sequence. Placement of students with no Latin coursework at the University is made on the basis of an examination and/or an interview. Generally the following policies apply:

  1. If the student has no previous training in Latin, the following options are available:
    1. Latin 506, First-Year Latin I.
    2. Latin 506Q, Accelerated First-Year Latin, which covers the same coursework as Latin 506 and 507 in one semester.
  2. Students who have had two years of Latin in high school, or one or two semesters of Latin at another university, should take Latin 508, a review course covering the fundamentals of grammar and syntax in one semester.
  3. Students who have recently had more than two years of Latin in high school, or more than two semesters of Latin at another university, should take Latin 311.

The information in parentheses after a course number is the Texas Common Course Numbering (TCCN) designation. Only TCCN designations that are exact semester-hour equivalents of University courses are listed here. Additional TCCN information is given in Appendix A.

Lower-Division Courses

506 (TCCN: LATI 1511). First-Year Latin I. Fundamentals of grammar and reading. Five class hours a week for one semester. Latin 506 and 506Q may not both be counted.

506Q. Accelerated First-Year Latin. A rapid survey of basic Latin for students of high linguistic aptitude. Five class hours a week for one semester. Latin 506 and 506Q may not both be counted; Latin 506Q and 507 may not both be counted; Latin 506Q and 508 may not both be counted.

507 (TCCN: LATI 1512). First-Year Latin II. Five class hours a week for one semester. Latin 506Q and 507 may not both be counted; Latin 507 and 508 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Latin 506 with a grade of at least C.

508. Essentials of Latin Grammar. Intended as a review course of the fundamentals for students with two or more high school units in Latin. Five class hours a week for one semester. Latin 506Q and 508 may not both be counted; Latin 507 and 508 may not both be counted.

309K. Conference Course. Supervised individual instruction in second-year Latin reading. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

311 (TCCN: LATI 2311). Second-Year Latin I: Selected Roman Writers. Introduction to reading Latin verse and prose writers in their cultural context. Includes grammar review. Three class hours a week for one semester. Latin 311 and 511K may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Latin 506Q, 507, or 508 with a grade of at least C.

511K. Accelerated Second-Year Latin. Designed primarily for students of high academic ability and motivation. Covers the same material as Latin 311 and 312K. Five class hours a week for one semester. Latin 311 and 511K may not both be counted; Latin 511K and 312K may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Latin 506Q, 507, or 508 with a grade of A.

312K. Second-Year Latin II: Vergil's Aeneid. Readings in Vergil's Aeneid with attention to its cultural context. Three class hours a week for one semester. Latin 511K and 312K may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Latin 311 with a grade of at least C, or consent of the undergraduate adviser.

312M. Second-Year Latin II: Prose. Selected readings from Cicero, Sallust, and/or other Latin prose writers. Three class hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Latin 311 with a grade of at least C, or consent of the undergraduate adviser.

316. Lyric Poetry: Classical and Medieval. Latin 316 and 366 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Latin 311 with a grade of at least C.

119S, 219S, 319S, 419S, 519S, 619S, 719S, 819S, 919S. Topics in Latin. This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Center for Global Educational Opportunities. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Classics. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

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Upper-Division Courses

323. Latin Poetry and Prose: Junior Reading. Cicero's philosophical works, and other selected works such as Catullus and Livy. Three class hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Latin 312K, 312M, or 316 with a grade of at least C; and consent of the undergraduate adviser.

Topic 1: Caesar.

Topic 2: Catullus.

Topic 3: Cicero.

Topic 4: Livy.

324. Advanced Latin Grammar and Composition. Three class hours a week for one semester. Required of all Latin majors and students seeking a secondary school teaching certificate with Latin as a teaching field. Prerequisite: Latin 312K with a grade of at least C and consent of instructor.

129S, 229S, 329S, 429S, 529S, 629S, 729S, 829S, 929S. Topics in Latin. This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Center for Global Educational Opportunities. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Classics. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

365. Advanced Latin Reading. Major classical writers such as Lucretius, Tacitus, Horace, Livy, Ovid, Juvenal. Three class hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Latin 323 with a grade of at least C, or consent of the undergraduate adviser.

Topic 1: Horace.

Topic 2: Lucretius.

Topic 3: Ovid's Metamorphoses.

Topic 4: Tacitus.

Topic 5: Vergil's Aeneid, Books VII–XII.

Topic 6: Catullus. Latin 365 (Topic 6) and 365 (Topic: The World of Catullus) may not both be counted.

Topic 7: Vergil's Eclogues.

366. Advanced Lyric Poetry: Classical and Medieval. Rapid reading of substantial portions of major Latin writers, including medieval writers. Three class hours a week for one semester. Latin 316 and 366 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Latin 323 or the equivalent.

370. Advanced Conference Course. Supervised reading. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

679H. Honors Tutorial Course. Supervised conference course for honors candidates in Latin. Three conference hours a week for two semesters. Prerequisite: For 679HA, upper-division standing and admission to the Latin Honors Program; for 679HB, Latin 679HA.

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Undergraduate Catalog | 2006-2008
College of Liberal Arts
page 14 of 41 in Chapter 10
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College of Liberal Arts Office of the Registrar University of Texas at Austin copyright 2006
Official Publications 15 Aug 2006