College of Liberal Arts Office of the Registrar University of Texas at Austin
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Undergraduate Catalog | 2006-2008
College of Liberal Arts
page 15 of 41 in Chapter 10
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To courses in » L A Liberal Arts | LAH Liberal Arts Honors | AMS American Studies | ANT Anthropology | ARY Archaeology | ANS Asian Studies | BEN Bengali | CHI Chinese | HIN Hindi | JPN Japanese | KOR Korean | MAL Malayalam | SAN Sanskrit | TAM Tamil | URD Urdu | VTN Vietnamese | AHC Ancient History and Classical Civilization | C C Classical Civilization | GK Greek | LAT Latin | CGS Cognitive Science | C L Comparative Literature | CXS Connexus | CLS Cultural Studies | ECO Economics | English | AFR African and African American Studies | YOR Yoruba | AAS Asian American Studies | MAS Mexican American Studies | EUS European Studies | FR French | F C French Civilization | ITL Italian | ITC Italian Civilization | F S Freshman Seminar | GRG Geography | URB Urban Studies | DAN Danish | DCH Dutch | GER German | GRC Germanic Civilization | NOR Norwegian | SCA Scandinavian | SWE Swedish | YID Yiddish | GOV Government | HIS History | HMN Humanities | LAS Latin American Studies | ASL American Sign Language | LIN Linguistics | ARA Arabic | HEB Hebrew | ISL Islamic Studies | J S Jewish Studies | MES Middle Eastern Studies | PRS Persian | TUR Turkish | PHL Philosophy | S S Social Science | T C Tutorial Course | PSY Psychology | R S Religious Studies | RHE Rhetoric and Writing | AFS Air Force Science | M S Military Science | N S Naval Science | REE Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies | STS Science, Technology, and Society | CZ Czech | POL Polish | RUS Russian | S C Serbian/Croatian | SLA Slavic | SOC Sociology | PRC Portuguese Civilization | POR Portuguese | SPN Spanish | UTL UTeach-Liberal Arts | WGS Women's and Gender Studies
 

Cognitive Science

CGS | Cognitive Science

Upper-Division Course

360. Cognitive Science: The Study of Mind. An introduction to the study of mind known as cognitive science, focusing on key areas such as vision and language, cognition and problem solving, artificial intelligence. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

Topic 1: Introduction to Cognitive Science. Same as Linguistics 373 (Topic 7: Introduction to Cognitive Science) and Philosophy 365 (Topic 2: Introduction to Cognitive Science).

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Comparative Literature

Unless otherwise stated below, each course meets for three lecture hours a week for one semester.

C L | Comparative Literature

Lower-Division Courses

301. Introduction to Comparative Literature. Reading and interpretation of literary texts in translation drawn from cultures around the world, focusing on methods of criticism and analysis.

315. Masterworks of World Literature. Introduction to masterpieces of the world's literary traditions, emphasizing historical, generic, and thematic connections. Some sections require an additional discussion hour a week. Only one of the following may be counted: Comparative Literature 315, English 603B, 316K, Tutorial Course 603B. Prerequisite: Completion of at least twenty-seven semester hours of coursework, including Rhetoric and Writing 306 or the equivalent, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test (or an appropriate assessment test).

Upper-Division Courses

320. Conference Course in Comparative Literature. Independent study of literary projects under supervision of professors in comparative literature. Prerequisite: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in literature, of which three hours must be in a classical or foreign language.

323. Topics in Comparative Literature. Study of masterpieces of world literature; of different literary genres; of the relationship between literature and other disciplines, such as psychology, philosophy, and film; and of special topics of a comparative nature. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 2: Literature and Music. Same as English 320M (Topic 1: Literature and Music). Comparative Literature 323 (Topic 2) and English 320M (Topic: Literature and Music: Shakespeare to Stravinsky) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Rhetoric and Writing 306 and English 316K or their equivalents, and three additional semester hours of lower-division coursework in either English or rhetoric and writing.

Topic 3: Autobiography: A Modern Literary Species. Same as African and African American Studies 374 (Topic 25: Autobiography: A Modern Literary Species), English 379N (Topic 5: Autobiography: A Modern Literary Species), and Middle Eastern Studies 322K (Topic 25: Autobiography: A Modern Literary Species). Comparative Literature 323 (Topic 3) and Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures 374 (Topic 2: Autobiography: A Modern Literary Species) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Rhetoric and Writing 306 and English 316K or their equivalents, and three additional semester hours of lower-division coursework in either English or rhetoric and writing.

Topic 4: Self-Revelation in Women's Writing. Same as African and African American Studies 374 (Topic 26: Self-Revelation in Women's Writing), English 376L (Topic 9: Self-Revelation in Women's Writing), Middle Eastern Studies 322K (Topic 26: Self-Revelation in Women's Writing), and Women's and Gender Studies 340 (Topic 14: Self-Revelation in Women's Writing). Comparative Literature 323 (Topic 4) and Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures 374 (Topic 3: Self-Revelation in Women's Writing) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Rhetoric and Writing 306 and English 316K or their equivalents, and three additional semester hours of lower-division coursework in either English or rhetoric and writing.

Topic 5: The Enlightenment. Same as English 379N (Topic 6: The Enlightenment). Only one of the following may be counted: Comparative Literature 323 (Topic 5), French Civilization 349 (Topic: The Enlightenment), Philosophy 354 (Topic: The Enlightenment). Prerequisite: Rhetoric and Writing 306 and English 316K or their equivalents, and three additional semester hours of lower-division coursework in either English or rhetoric and writing.

324. The History of Fantastic Literature. Open to all University students. The history of fantastic and fantasy literature.

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Connexus

CXS | Connexus

Lower-Division Courses

102D, 202D, 302D. Connecting Internship Experience. Supervised internship experience related to interdisciplinary themes of a Bridging Disciplines Program. Internships may be on or off campus, be paid or unpaid, and may include work with nonprofit agencies, government offices, or private corporations. For 102D, three hours of fieldwork a week for one semester; for 202D, six hours of fieldwork a week for one semester; for 302D, ten hours of fieldwork a week for one semester. With consent of the Bridging Disciplines Programs research coordinator, may be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: Admission to the Bridging Disciplines Programs.

118, 218, 318. Connexus Forum Seminar Series. Restricted to freshmen and sophomores. Discussion of various contemporary issues, with an emphasis on multidisciplinary perspectives and critical discourse. For 118, two lecture hours a week for eight weeks; for 218, two lecture hours a week for one semester; for 318, three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Connexus 118, 218, 318 and Freshman Seminar 118, 218, 318 may not both be counted unless the topics vary. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

Upper-Division Course

128C, 228C, 328C. Advanced Connexus Forum Seminar Series. Discussion of contemporary issues related to the topics of a Bridging Disciplines Program, with an emphasis on multidisciplinary perspectives, research, and critical discourse. For 128C, two lecture hours a week for eight weeks; for 228C, two lecture hours a week for one semester; for 328C, three lecture hours or two lecture hours and one hour of supervised research a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing. Additional prerequisites may vary with the topic and are given in the Course Schedule.

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Américo Paredes Center for Cultural Studies

Unless otherwise stated below, each course meets for three lecture hours a week for one semester.

CLS | Cultural Studies

Lower-Division Course

119S, 219S, 319S, 419S, 519S, 619S, 719S, 819S, 919S. Topics in Folklore and Cultural Studies. This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Center for Global Educational Opportunities. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in cultural studies. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Upper-Division Courses

129S, 229S, 329S, 429S, 529S, 629S, 729S, 829S, 929S. Topics in Folklore and Cultural Studies. This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Center for Global Educational Opportunities. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in cultural studies. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

340. Conference Course in Folklore and Cultural Studies. Supervised reading and research on a folklore or cultural studies subject, including the writing of an original paper. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and a concentration in cultural studies.

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Related Courses

For a description of each of the following courses, see the chapter for the college that offers the course.

College of Fine Arts

Music 303M. Introduction to Traditional Musics in World Cultures.

Music 334. The Music of the Americas.

Music 342. Area Studies in Ethnomusicology.

College of Liberal Arts

Anthropology 302. Cultural Anthropology.

Anthropology 305. Expressive Culture.

Anthropology 320L. Topics in Language, Culture, and Communication.

Anthropology 324L. Topics in Anthropology.

Anthropology 325L. Cultural Studies, Public Culture, and Folklore: Selected Topics.

Classical Civilization 303. Introduction to Classical Mythology.

English 325K. Introduction to Folklore and Folklife.

English 326K. The Literature of the Middle Ages in Translation.

English 342. Life and Literature of the Southwest.

English 376M. Studies in African and African American Literature.

Mexican American Studies 307. Introduction to Cultural Studies.

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Department of Economics

Unless otherwise stated below, each course meets for three lecture hours a week for one semester.

ECO | Economics

The information in parentheses after a course number is the Texas Common Course Numbering (TCCN) designation. Only TCCN designations that are exact semester-hour equivalents of University courses are listed here. Additional TCCN information is given in Appendix A.

Lower-Division Courses

304K (TCCN: ECON 2302). Introduction to Microeconomics. Analysis of the economic behavior of individual consumers, firms, and workers; special attention to the role of markets.

304L (TCCN: ECON 2301). Introduction to Macroeconomics. Analysis of the economy as a whole (its organization and the basic forces influencing its growth and development); money and banking, national income, public finance, and international linkages. Prerequisite: Economics 304K with a grade of at least C.

305. Introductory Topics in Economics. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

119S, 219S, 319S, 419S, 519S, 619S, 719S, 819S, 919S. Topics in Economics. This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Center for Global Educational Opportunities. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Economics. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

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Upper-Division Courses

420K. Microeconomic Theory. A survey of neoclassical and contemporary theories of the principal determinants of prices and of the role of prices in economic organization. Four lecture hours a week for one semester. Required of students majoring in economics. Students may not attempt Economics 420K more than twice. Prerequisite: Economics 304K and 304L with a grade of at least C in each, and Mathematics 408C and 408D, or Mathematics 408K, 408L, and 408M, with a grade of at least C in each.

320L. Macroeconomic Theory. Theory of the determination of national income, employment, and the price level, with policy implications. Required of students majoring in economics. Prerequisite: Economics 420K with a grade of at least C.

321. Public Economics. Study of appropriate allocations of economic activity between government (federal, state, and local) and the private sector. The workings of social security, welfare, education, pollution control, deregulation, taxation; and proposals for reform. Prerequisite: Economics 420K with a grade of at least C.

322. Money and Banking. The role of money and depository institutions in the economy; introduction to financial and monetary theory and policy. Only one of the following may be counted: Economics 322, Finance 354, 354H. Prerequisite: Economics 420K and 320L with a grade of at least C in each.

323T. Studies in Economic History. Study of economic development, emphasizing more recent periods; causal factors, emerging problems, and major policy issues. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Economics 304K and 304L with a grade of at least C in each.

Topic 1: Economic History of the United States. Economic history of the United States from colonial times to the present. Includes some aspects of labor history, industrial organization, financial history, and socioeconomic perspectives.

Topic 2: World Economic History. Economic history of the world from the Industrial Revolution to the present, with emphasis on technology as the engine of change. Economics 323T (Topic 2) and History 366N (Topic 13: World Economic History) may not both be counted.

324. Introduction to Labor Economics. Study of labor in industrial societies, with emphasis on principles, institutions, and policies for understanding labor and personnel problems. Prerequisite: Economics 420K with a grade of at least C.

327. Comparative Economic Systems. Theories of and practices in the principal types of economic systems. Prerequisite: Economics 304K and 304L with a grade of at least C in each.

328. Industrial Organization. The organization of industries and markets: competition, monopoly, and oligopoly; antitrust policy and its alternatives. Prerequisite: Economics 420K with a grade of at least C.

329. Economic Statistics. Methods of statistical analysis and interpretation of quantitative data in the field of economics. Required of economics majors. Prerequisite: Economics 304K and 304L with a grade of at least C in each, and Mathematics 408C and 408D, or Mathematics 408K, 408L, and 408M, with a grade of at least C in each.

129S, 229S, 329S, 429S, 529S, 629S, 729S, 829S, 929S. Topics in Economics. This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Center for Global Educational Opportunities. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Economics. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

333K. Development Economics. Introduction to theories of economic development; discussion of leading issues. Asian Studies 361 (Topic 21: Development Economics) and Economics 333K may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Economics 420K with a grade of at least C.

334K. Urban Economics. Same as Urban Studies 351 (Topic 2: Urban Economics). Economic analysis of urban areas; emphasis on the nature of current urban problems—slums, transportation, finance—and an evaluation of current policy. Prerequisite: Economics 420K with a grade of at least C.

334L. Regional Economics. Same as Urban Studies 351 (Topic 3: Regional Economics). Spatial aspects of economics, including concepts, theories, and policy applications. Prerequisite: Economics 420K with a grade of at least C.

339K. International Trade and Investment. International trade theory, balance of payments, commodity trade, international finance and foreign exchange rates, foreign investments. Economics 339K and International Business 350 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Economics 420K with a grade of at least C.

339L. International Finance. How foreign exchange rates are determined, why national interest rates differ, why risk is inherent when trading in international finance markets, and the role of international organizations such as the International Monetary Fund in crisis management. Prerequisite: Economics 420K and 320L with a grade of at least C in each; Economics 339K is recommended.

341K. Introduction to Econometrics. Introduces the student to standard regression procedures of parameter estimation and hypothesis testing in economics. Prerequisite: Economics 420K and 329 with a grade of at least C in each; Mathematics 408D is recommended.

346K. Russian Economic Development since 1917. The growth of the planned economy in industry, agriculture, and labor. Economics 346K and Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies 335 (Topic 13: Russian Economic Development since 1917) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Economics 304K and 304L with a grade of at least C in each.

350K. Selected Topics in Economics. Topics may include problems in economic theory, applications, and economic policy. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Economics 420K with a grade of at least C. Additional prerequisites vary with the topic and are given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 4: Advanced Econometrics. Theory of the linear regression model used widely in economic applications, including model specification, least squares and maximum likelihood estimation, hypothesis testing, multicollinearity, dummy variables, heteroskedasticity, and discrete choice models. Prerequisite: Economics 329 with a grade of at least C, and Mathematics 408D, 340L, or 341. Economics 341K or Mathematics 362K is recommended.

Topic 6: Advanced Microeconomic Theory. Modern theory of the consumer and the firm. Topics include an analysis of consumer choice and demand functions, the theory of supply, cost and profit functions, duality theory, consumer surplus, choice under uncertainty, and partial equilibrium analysis. Emphasis on both economic principles and quantitative methods, especially static and dynamic optimization models. Prerequisite: Economics 329 with a grade of at least C, and Mathematics 408D, 340L, or 341.

Topic 7: Applied Economic Analysis. Major issues in applied economics, including relevant theoretical and empirical models. Prerequisite: Economics 329 with a grade of at least C, and Mathematics 408D, 340L, or 341. Economics 341K or Mathematics 362K is recommended.

351K. Current Issues in Business Economics. Newly emerging problems in business and the approaches used for structuring, analyzing, and treating them. Prerequisite: Economics 420K with a grade of at least C.

351L. Business Trends and the Operational Environment in the United States Economy. The technological basis of the United States economy; conditions, such as regulations, that define the macroenvironment. Prerequisite: Economics 420K, 320L, and 329 with a grade of at least C in each.

351M. Managerial Economics. The use of economic analysis optimizing techniques as tools for improving managerial decision making in business. Prerequisite: Economics 420K, and Economics 329 or Mathematics 362K, with a grade of at least C in each.

354K. Introductory Game Theory. Introduction to the formal study of interdependent decision making. Applications of game theory include pricing and advertising strategies, labor-management bargaining, and tariff negotiations. Prerequisite: Economics 420K and 329 with a grade of at least C in each.

355. Development Problems and Policies in Latin America. Same as Latin American Studies 355 (Topic 1: Development Problems and Policies in Latin America) and Urban Studies 351 (Topic 1: Development Problems and Policies in Latin America). Description of the Latin American economy; business and market organization; problem of growth (involving credit, public finance, trade, investment aspects). Prerequisite: Economics 304K and 304L with a grade of at least C in each.

357K. Marxist Economics. An introduction to the Marxian economic theory of capitalism through the study of Karl Marx's Capital, volume I, and of its contemporary relevance. Economics 357K and Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies 335 (Topic 1: Marxist Economics) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

357L. Political Economy of International Crisis. Examines several dimensions of the ongoing crises in the world economic order and the interrelationships among them. Problem areas covered are neoliberalism, international money, debt, famine, immigration, and energy shocks. Economics 357L and Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies 335 (Topic 14: Political Economy of International Crisis) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Economics 304K and 304L with a grade of at least C in each.

359M. Environmental and Natural Resource Economics. Optimal use of exhaustible and renewable resources, including fuels, minerals, fisheries, forests, and water; resource scarcity and economic growth; valuation of nonmarketed environmental amenities; the economics of pollution control instruments, including taxes, permits, direct regulation, and negotiation; environmental quality and international trade; the economics of global climate change; pollution control policy in practice. Prerequisite: Economics 420K and 329 with a grade of at least C in each.

361. Studies in Public Economics. Studies in the principal problem areas of governmental revenues and expenditures. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Economics 420K with a grade of at least C.

361N. Informational Society. The social impact of the current technological changes in electronics, communications, and automation; focus on efficient institutions given the technological possibilities. Prerequisite: Economics 304K and 304L with a grade of at least C in each.

362M. Mathematics for Economists. Application of mathematics in economic analysis. Prerequisite: Economics 420K and Mathematics 408D with a grade of at least C in each.

363C. Computational Economics. Prerequisite: Economics 420K or 320L with a grade of at least C.

367R. Monetary Economics. Major issues in the monetary field. Prerequisite: Economics 420K and 320L with a grade of at least C in each; Economics 322 is recommended.

368. Survey of the History of Economic Thought. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

369F. Financial Economics. Economic analysis of the operation of financial markets, including arbitrage theory, asset pricing, and corporate finance. Prerequisite: Economics 420K, 320L, and 329 with a grade of at least C in each; Economics 322 is recommended.

372M. Studies in Developing Economies. An introductory analysis of the structure, functioning, and problems of developing economies. Specific geographical areas to be studied will vary each semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Economics 420K with a grade of at least C.

376M. Studies in Labor Economics. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Economics 420K with a grade of at least C.

377R. Economics Research. Designed to teach undergraduate students how to conduct research. Focus on four fundamentals of economic research: the economic theory that underlies the research question, the research methods used, conducting research, and writing the research report. Three lecture hours a week for one semester; some topics may require field trips. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, and Economics 420K, 320L, and 329 with a grade of at least C in each. Economics 341K or 350K (Topic 4: Advanced Econometrics) is recommended.

378H. Honors Tutorial Course I. Supervised individual reading, research, and writing of a substantial paper on a special topic in the field of economics. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, admission to the Economics Honors Program, and consent of the honors adviser.

379C. Individual Conference Course. Supervised individual study of selected problems in economics. May be repeated for credit. May not be counted toward the twenty-four semester hours in economics required for the major in economics. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and consent of instructor. Students should ordinarily have completed six semester hours of upper-division coursework in economics and coursework with supervising instructor.

379D. Internship in Economics. Students conduct research while working in an appropriate government agency or private business. Five to ten hours a week for one semester. Offered on the pass/fail basis only. May be repeated once for credit when the internships vary. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

379H. Honors Tutorial Course II. Supervised individual reading, research, and writing of a substantial paper on a special topic in the field of economics. Prerequisite: Economics 378H.

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Undergraduate Catalog | 2006-2008
College of Liberal Arts
page 15 of 41 in Chapter 10
« prev | next »
College of Liberal Arts Office of the Registrar University of Texas at Austin copyright 2006
Official Publications 15 Aug 2006