College of Liberal Arts Office of the Registrar University of Texas at Austin
Official Publications Admissions Current Students UT EID
Undergraduate Catalog | 2006-2008
College of Liberal Arts
page 35 of 41 in Chapter 10
« prev | next »
To courses in » L A Liberal Arts | LAH Liberal Arts Honors | AMS American Studies | ANT Anthropology | ARY Archaeology | ANS Asian Studies | BEN Bengali | CHI Chinese | HIN Hindi | JPN Japanese | KOR Korean | MAL Malayalam | SAN Sanskrit | TAM Tamil | URD Urdu | VTN Vietnamese | AHC Ancient History and Classical Civilization | C C Classical Civilization | GK Greek | LAT Latin | CGS Cognitive Science | C L Comparative Literature | CXS Connexus | CLS Cultural Studies | ECO Economics | English | AFR African and African American Studies | YOR Yoruba | AAS Asian American Studies | MAS Mexican American Studies | EUS European Studies | FR French | F C French Civilization | ITL Italian | ITC Italian Civilization | F S Freshman Seminar | GRG Geography | URB Urban Studies | DAN Danish | DCH Dutch | GER German | GRC Germanic Civilization | NOR Norwegian | SCA Scandinavian | SWE Swedish | YID Yiddish | GOV Government | HIS History | HMN Humanities | LAS Latin American Studies | ASL American Sign Language | LIN Linguistics | ARA Arabic | HEB Hebrew | ISL Islamic Studies | J S Jewish Studies | MES Middle Eastern Studies | PRS Persian | TUR Turkish | PHL Philosophy | S S Social Science | T C Tutorial Course | PSY Psychology | R S Religious Studies | RHE Rhetoric and Writing | AFS Air Force Science | M S Military Science | N S Naval Science | REE Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies | STS Science, Technology, and Society | CZ Czech | POL Polish | RUS Russian | S C Serbian/Croatian | SLA Slavic | SOC Sociology | PRC Portuguese Civilization | POR Portuguese | SPN Spanish | UTL UTeach-Liberal Arts | WGS Women's and Gender Studies
 

ROTC Courses

Department of Air Force Science

The Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFROTC) was activated at the University of Texas in September, 1947. The program is designed to commission career-oriented officers who meet specific Air Force requirements. The AFROTC objective is to place on active duty lieutenants who demonstrate dedication to their assignments, willing acceptance of responsibility, critical and creative thinking, and the ability to speak and write effectively. Most cadets incur a four-year active-duty commitment. However, pilots incur a ten-year active-duty service commitment after completing specialized undergraduate pilot training, and navigators incur a six-year commitment after completing specialized undergraduate navigator training. The minimum service obligation for intelligence and air battle management career fields is six years. Graduate education is also possible under the auspices of the Air Force while on active duty.

A wide variety of extracurricular activity is available through AFROTC. Intramural athletics, parades, ceremonies, parties, dinners, picnics, field trips to Air Force installations, and membership in national military societies are typical examples.

AFROTC courses are taught by Air Force officers and are approved for college credit toward the cadet's degree program in amounts determined by the college concerned. Students may choose from several programs.

AFROTC scholarships are available to selected cadets. These scholarships, available to freshmen, sophomores, and first-semester juniors, are for two to four years; they cover full tuition costs, laboratory expenses, and incidental fees and provide an allowance for textbooks and a monthly stipend. Scholarships are awarded on the basis of overall merit, with particular attention paid to academic achievement. Established academic standards must be maintained in order to retain the scholarships. Other scholarships are also available for upper-division cadets. For additional information, contact the chair of the department.

Department of Air Force Science courses are designed to prepare selected students for a commission in the United States Air Force through the AFROTC program. Students who do not hold AFROTC scholarships may take lower-division courses with no military obligation. Scholarship students and selected students who elect to take upper-division courses do so on contract and, upon graduation and commissioning, enter active duty in the Air Force.

Unless otherwise stated below, each course meets for three lecture hours a week for one semester.

to top »

AFS | Air Force Science

Lower-Division Courses (General Military Courses)

100. Leadership Laboratory. Various leadership techniques, including drill and ceremonies, customs and courtesies, and uniform standards. Two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered on the pass/fail basis only.

102K. The Foundations of the United States Air Force I. Introductory course exploring the overall roles and missions of the United States Air Force and career fields available in the Air Force. Emphasis on military customs and courtesies, appearance standards, Air Force core values, and written communication. One lecture hour a week for one semester. Offered in the fall semester only. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Air Force Science 100.

102L. The Foundations of the United States Air Force II. Continuation of Air Force Science 102K, with an introduction to American military history and emphasis on personal communication. One lecture hour a week for one semester. Offered in the spring semester only. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Air Force Science 100.

111K. The Evolution of USAF Air and Space Power I. Key historical events and milestones in the development of air power as a primary instrument of United States national security. One lecture hour a week for one semester. Offered in the fall semester only. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Air Force Science 100.

111L. The Evolution of USAF Air and Space Power II. Continuation of Air Force Science 111K. One lecture hour a week for one semester. Offered in the spring semester only. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Air Force Science 100.

to top »

Upper-Division Courses (Professional Officer Courses)

120L. Leadership Laboratory. Leadership laboratory course for upper-division students. Further development of leadership skills through leadership positions within the cadet corps. Includes training of freshman and sophomore students as well as a practicum in Air Force unit operation. Two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered on the pass/fail basis only.

321. Air Force Leadership Studies I. Study of leadership, management fundamentals, professional knowledge, Air Force personnel and evaluation systems, leadership ethics, and communication skills required of an Air Force junior officer. Case studies are used to examine Air Force leadership and management situations as a means of demonstrating and exercising practical application of the concepts being studied. Offered in the fall semester only. Prerequisite: Air Force Science 102K, 102L, 111K, and 111L; concurrent enrollment in Air Force Science 120L; and a four- or five-week field training course or equivalent ROTC or military training.

322. Air Force Leadership Studies II. Continuation of Air Force Science 321. Offered in the spring semester only. Prerequisite: Air Force Science 321 and concurrent enrollment in Air Force Science 120L.

331. National Security Affairs. Evolution of the role of national security in a democratic society, with emphasis on policy formulation, competing values, and organizations. Area studies and the impact of developing nations on United States national security. Offered in the fall semester only. Prerequisite: Air Force Science 322 and concurrent enrollment in Air Force Science 120L.

332. Current Issues and Preparation for Active Duty. Acculturation to active duty. Includes study of the evolution and jurisdiction of military law, officership, and current Air Force issues. Offered in the spring semester only. Prerequisite: Air Force Science 331, and concurrent enrollment in Air Force Science 120L or consent of the department chair.

to top »

Department of Military Science

The Army Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) was established at the University of Texas in September, 1947. As a senior division unit, it is designed to provide a course of military instruction that will permit qualified students to prepare themselves for commissions as second lieutenants while they pursue other academic courses leading to baccalaureate or advanced degrees from the University.

Upon being commissioned a second lieutenant, each student has the opportunity to serve in the active Army, Army Reserve, or National Guard.

The Army ROTC program, in addition to providing a basic foundation in military subjects, is designed to develop the highest qualities of leadership, character, and citizenship through the wide variety of extracurricular activities it sponsors. Such activities include parades, ceremonies, social events, a Ranger detachment, and intramural athletic teams.

The Army ROTC program is normally a four-year program divided into a basic course and an advanced course. The basic course is conducted during the first two years and the advanced course during the last two years. Students incur no military obligation until they enter the advanced course. Certain students may qualify for advanced placement in the program based on previous military training in Junior ROTC, a service academy, active duty in a military service, credit for other college courses, or completion of a special six-week summer camp, normally between the sophomore and the junior year.

The Department of the Army has determined that a need exists for all Army ROTC cadets to have a demonstrated proficiency in selected disciplines. These courses are called Professional Military Education (PME) and must be completed prior to graduation. A list of courses that fulfill PME requirements is available from the chair of the Department of Military Science.

Two-, three-, and four-year scholarship programs are offered to selected cadets. The four-year scholarship program is administered by the Department of the Army, but selection is based on the Professor of Military Science Order of Merit List (OML). Applicants must apply while in high school. The remaining programs are administered directly through the Department of Military Science.

Scholarship students receive $250 to $400 a month for up to ten months for each year of their scholarship. The scholarship pays for required tuition, fees, and laboratory expenses, and provides an allowance each semester for books. Nonscholarship students receive $350 to $400 a month during the advanced course. For additional information, contact the scholarship and enrollment officer.

Unless otherwise stated below, each course meets for three lecture hours a week for one semester.

to top »

M S | Military Science

Lower-Division Courses

000. Leadership Laboratory. Open only to students in associated military science courses. Leadership responsibilities for planning, coordination, execution, and evaluation of training and other activities. Self-confidence and team-building leadership skills that can be applied throughout life. One and one-half laboratory hours a week for one semester. Required of all military science students. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in another military science course.

101. Basic Military Science I-A. Designed to increase self-confidence through team study and activities in basic drill, physical fitness, rappelling, leadership reaction course, first aid, making presentations, and basic marksmanship. Fundamental concepts of leadership in a profession. One one-hour lecture/practice session a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Military Science 000.

103. Basic Military Science I-B. Principles of effective leading. Designed to reinforce self-confidence through participation in physically and mentally challenging exercises with upper-division ROTC students. Communication skills that improve individual performance and group interaction. Relationship of organizational ethical values to the effectiveness of a leader. One one-hour lecture/practice session a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Military Science 000.

210. Basic Military Science II-A. Ethics-based leadership skills designed to develop individual abilities and contribute to effective team-building. Focus on oral presentations, writing concisely, planning of events, coordination of group efforts, advanced first aid, land navigation, and basic military tactics. Fundamentals of ROTC's Leadership Assessment Program. Two lecture/practice hours a week for one semester, and a weekend field training exercise. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Military Science 000.

212. Basic Military Science II-B. Introduction to individual and team aspects of military tactics in small-unit operations. Includes use of radio communications, making safety assessments, movement techniques, planning for team safety/security, and methods of pre-execution checks. Practical exercises with upper-division ROTC students. Techniques for training others as an aspect of continued leadership development. Two lecture/practice hours a week for one semester, and a weekend field training exercise. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Military Science 000.

to top »

Upper-Division Courses

320. Advanced Military Science III-A. Series of practical opportunities to lead small groups, receive personal assessments and encouragement, and lead again in situations of increasing complexity. Use of small-unit defensive tactics and opportunities to plan and conduct training for lower-division students. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Military Science 000 and approval of departmental representative.

320K. Advanced Military Science III-B. Continued study of methods covered in Military Science 320. Students analyze tasks; prepare written or oral guidance for team members to accomplish tasks; delegate tasks and supervise; plan for and adapt to the unexpected in organizations under stress; examine and apply lessons from leadership case studies; examine the importance of ethical decision making in enhancing team performance. Three lecture/practice hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Military Science 000 and approval of departmental representative.

375. Leadership and Ethics (IV-A). Military leadership and professional ethics; post and installation support system; introduction to the military justice system. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Military Science 000 and approval of departmental representative.

375K. Transition to Lieutenant (IV-B). Fundamentals of the military justice system; training and logistical management systems; military social functions; role of the second lieutenant. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Military Science 000 and approval of departmental representative.

379. Advanced Military Science V-A. Advanced study and research on historic and contemporary military subjects and events. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Military Science 000.

379K. Advanced Military Science V-B. Advanced study and research on historic and contemporary military subjects and events. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Military Science 000.

to top »

Department of Naval Science

The Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps (NROTC) was established at the University of Texas in September, 1940, to offer the naval science courses necessary to qualify University students for commissions in the United States Navy or Marine Corps.

Qualified students may apply for the four-year or two-year Navy-Marine Scholarship Program or college program (nonscholarship) and earn a commission in the Navy or Marine Corps.

NROTC scholarship students are appointed midshipmen, United States Naval Reserve, by the Secretary of the Navy, and granted the compensation and benefits authorized by law. While students attend the University, the Navy pays tuition, cost of textbooks, fees of instructional nature, and a subsistence allowance of $250 to $450 a month during the academic year. During drill periods and summer training periods, midshipmen wear government-furnished uniforms. Scholarships are obtained by applying to a naval recruiting station before December 1 of each year or to the Department of Naval Science after the first semester of enrollment in the college program. For additional information, contact the chair of the department.

Unless otherwise stated below, each course meets for three lecture hours a week for one semester.

to top »

N S | Naval Science

Lower-Division Courses

000. Drill. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester.

302. Introduction to Naval Science. A general introduction to sea power and the naval service, including the mission, organization, regulations, warfare components, and personnel programs.

603. Naval Ships Systems I and II. Introduction to types, structures, and purposes of naval ships and weapons systems. Three lecture hours a week for two semesters.

312. Sea Power and Maritime Affairs. A consideration of the influence of sea power, naval history, and maritime affairs on current events and national policy. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

to top »

Upper-Division Courses

326. Evolution of Warfare. Explores the forms of warfare employed by great leaders in history as they relate to the evolution of warfare. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

329. Navigation and Naval Operations I. An introduction to piloting, a survey of navigational aids, and a study of the Rules of the Nautical Road.

330. Leadership and Ethics. Principles of leadership and ethics reinforced through seminar discussion and case studies. Discussion of the duties and responsibilities of a naval officer. Prerequisite: Naval Science 335 and consent of instructor.

335. Leadership and Management. Study of leadership and management theory in organizations, with emphasis on examining the leadership process in the context of the dynamic interaction of the leader, the followers, and the situation. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

362. Amphibious Warfare. Defines the concept of amphibious warfare, explores its doctrinal origins, and traces its evolution as an element of naval policy during the twentieth century.

369. Navigation and Naval Operations II. Study of the celestial sphere and nautical astronomy to determine positions on the earth by mathematical analysis, and an introduction to relative motion and the maneuvering board.

to top »
Undergraduate Catalog | 2006-2008
College of Liberal Arts
page 35 of 41 in Chapter 10
« prev | next »
College of Liberal Arts Office of the Registrar University of Texas at Austin copyright 2006
Official Publications 15 Aug 2006