College of Liberal Arts Office of the Registrar University of Texas at Austin
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Undergraduate Catalog | 2006-2008
College of Liberal Arts
page 37 of 41 in Chapter 10
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Department of Slavic and Eurasian Studies

Before enrolling for the first time in any language offered by the Department of Slavic and Eurasian Studies, all students with any knowledge of the language, however acquired, must take a placement test to determine the course for which they should register. Information on placement tests for Polish and Russian is available from the Division of Instructional Innovation and Assessment, 2616 Wichita. Information about testing in other languages is available from the department office.

The normal two-year sequence of lower-division courses in Russian is 506, 507, 412K, and 412L. In Czech, Polish, and Serbian/Croatian, it is 506, 507, 312K, and 312L.

Unless otherwise stated below, each course meets for three lecture hours a week for one semester.

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CZ | Czech

The information in parentheses after a course number is the Texas Common Course Numbering (TCCN) designation. Only TCCN designations that are exact semester-hour equivalents of University courses are listed here. Additional TCCN information is given in Appendix A.

Lower-Division Courses

301K. Introduction to Czech Civilization. Introduction to selected topics in the culture of the Czech and Slavic people. Conducted in English. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. May not be used to fulfill the foreign language requirement for any bachelor's degree.

Topic 1: Robots and Beer Pubs: Czech Culture. Introduction to the Czech people and culture, and how terms of Czech origin, such as "robot" and "pilsner beer," became common throughout the world. Also examines Czech art history and architecture.

506 (TCCN: CZEC 1511). First-Year Czech I. Five class hours a week for one semester.

507 (TCCN: CZEC 1512). First-Year Czech II. Five class hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Czech 506 or consent of instructor.

312K (TCCN: CZEC 2311). Second-Year Czech I. Prerequisite: Czech 507 or consent of instructor.

312L (TCCN: CZEC 2312). Second-Year Czech II. Prerequisite: Czech 312K or consent of instructor.

119S, 219S, 319S, 419S, 519S, 619S, 719S, 819S, 919S. Topics in Czech. This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Center for Global Educational Opportunities. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Slavic and Eurasian Studies. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

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Upper-Division Courses

324. Topics in Czech Studies. Study of a selected aspect or aspects of Czech culture: literature, theatre, film, visual arts, folklore. Readings and lectures in English. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. May not be used to fulfill the foreign language requirement for any degree. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: Crime and Punishment and Czech Writers. Examination of the influence of Dostoyevsky's Crime and Punishment on twentieth-century Czech writers.

Topic 2: Twentieth-Century Czech Fiction. A survey of twentieth-century Czech prose fiction.

Topic 3: Milan Kundera and World Literature. Explores the life and works of Milan Kundera, from his communist past to present postmodern Francophilia.

325. Third-Year Czech I. Prerequisite: Czech 312L.

326. Third-Year Czech II. Continuation of Czech 325. Prerequisite: Czech 325.

129S, 229S, 329S, 429S, 529S, 629S, 729S, 829S, 929S. Topics in Czech. This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Center for Global Educational Opportunities. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Slavic and Eurasian Studies. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

330. Modern Czech Literature. A study of Czech literature from the 1860s to the present; emphasis on translation from Czech into English. Czech 330 and Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies 325 (Topic: Modern Czech Literature) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

379. Conference Course in Czech Language or Literature. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in Czech, or upper-division standing and consent of instructor.

679H. Honors Tutorial Course. Supervised individual research on a literary honors paper of some length. Conference course for two semesters. Must be taken for special honors in addition to the major requirement. Prerequisite: For 679HA, upper-division standing, a University grade point average of at least 3.00, and a grade point average in Czech of at least 3.50; for 679HB, Czech 679HA.

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POL | Polish

Lower-Division Courses

506. First-Year Polish I. Emphasis on four-skills proficiency. Five class hours a week for one semester.

507. First-Year Polish II. Emphasis on four-skills proficiency. Five class hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Polish 506 or consent of instructor.

312K. Second-Year Polish I. Emphasis on four-skills proficiency. Three class hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Polish 507 or consent of instructor.

312L. Second-Year Polish II. Emphasis on four-skills proficiency. Three class hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Polish 312K or consent of instructor.

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Upper-Division Courses

321. Introduction to the Polish Language I. Designed to give students a rapid introduction to fundamentals of the language. May not be used to fulfill the foreign language requirement for any bachelor's degree.

322. Introduction to the Polish Language II. Continuation of Polish 321. May not be used to fulfill the foreign language requirement for any bachelor's degree. Prerequisite: Polish 321 or consent of instructor.

324. Topics in Polish Studies. Selected aspects of Polish history or culture. Readings and lectures in English. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. May not be used to fulfill the foreign language requirement for any degree. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: The Polish Experience. Same as Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies 325 (Topic 5: The Polish Experience). A historical, sociopolitical picture of Poland's complex cultural history. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

379. Conference Course in Polish Language or Literature. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in Polish or consent of instructor.

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RUS | Russian

The information in parentheses after a course number is the Texas Common Course Numbering (TCCN) designation. Only TCCN designations that are exact semester-hour equivalents of University courses are listed here. Additional TCCN information is given in Appendix A.

Lower-Division Courses

804. Accelerated First-Year Russian. Designed primarily for language majors. Covers the same material as Russian 506 and 507, but in one semester. Eight lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. May not be counted by students with credit for Russian 505S, 506, 506T, 507, or 507T.

505S. Intensive First-Year Russian I. Intensive introduction to proficiency in four skills in Russian (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), in preparation for study abroad program. Thirteen and one-half class hours a week for the first summer term. Only one of the following may be counted: Russian 804, 505S, 506, 506T.

506 (TCCN: RUSS 1511). First-Year Russian I. Five class hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Russian 804, 505S, 506, 506T.

506T. First-Year Russian for Special Purposes I. Possible sections include Russian for science and technology and Russian for business. Five class hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Russian 804, 505S, 506, 506T.

507 (TCCN: RUSS 1512). First-Year Russian II. Five class hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Russian 804, 507, 507T. Prerequisite: Russian 506 or 506T or appropriate score on Russian placement examination.

507T. First-Year Russian for Special Purposes II. Possible sections include Russian for science and technology and Russian for business. Five class hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Russian 804, 507, 507T. Prerequisite: Russian 506, 506T, or appropriate score on Russian placement examination.

612. Accelerated Second-Year Russian. Designed primarily for language majors. Covers the same material as Russian 412K and 412L, but in one semester. Six lecture hours a week for one semester. May not be counted by students with credit for Russian 412K (or 312K), 412L (or 312L), 312M, or 515S. Prerequisite: Russian 804, 507, 507T, or appropriate score on Russian placement examination.

312K, 412K. Second-Year Russian I. Four lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Russian 612, 412K (or 312K), 312M, 515S. Prerequisite: Russian 804, 507, 507T, or appropriate score on Russian placement examination.

312L, 412L. Second-Year Russian II. Four lecture hours a week for one semester. Russian 612 and 412L (or 312L) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Russian 412K (or 312K), 312M, or appropriate score on Russian placement examination.

312M. Second-Year Russian I—Technical. Only one of the following may be counted: Russian 612, 412K (or 312K), 312M, 515S. Prerequisite: Russian 804, 507, 507T, or appropriate score on Russian placement examination.

515S. Intensive Second-Year Russian I. Intensive extension and development of proficiency in four skills in Russian (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), in preparation for study abroad program. Thirteen and one-half class hours a week for the first summer term. Only one of the following may be counted: Russian 612, 412K (or 312K), 312M, 515S. Prerequisite: Russian 507, 507T, 804, or appropriate score on Russian placement examination.

316C. Masterworks of Russian Literature in Translation. Introduction to the masterpieces of the Russian literary tradition in English translation, emphasizing cultural and social context. Conducted in English.

119S, 219S, 319S, 419S, 519S, 619S, 719S, 819S, 919S. Topics in Russian. This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Center for Global Educational Opportunities. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Slavic and Eurasian Studies. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

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Upper-Division Courses

324. Advanced Russian I. Oral expression, reading, and composition. Russian 324 and 525S may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Russian 612, 412L (or 312L), or appropriate score on Russian placement examination.

325. Advanced Russian II. Oral expression, reading, and composition. Prerequisite: Russian 324 or appropriate score on Russian placement examination.

525S. Intensive Third-Year Russian I. Intensive work in advanced composition and conversation skills in Russian, in preparation for study abroad program. Thirteen and one-half class hours a week for the first summer term. Russian 324 and 525S may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Russian 612, 412L (or 312L), or appropriate score on Russian placement examination.

326. Topics in Advanced Russian. A fourth-year course designed to enhance the student's skills in a variety of functional areas. Topics may include advanced oral communication, stylistics, Russian for business, literary translation of legal and business documents, scientific and technical translation. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

327. Advanced Training in Spoken Russian. Continuation of Russian 326. Prerequisite: Russian 326.

329. Survey of Original Texts in Russian Literature. Introduction to the reading and analysis of original literary texts representing prose, poetry, and drama, with emphasis on each work's cultural and historical background. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Two years of coursework in Russian, or the equivalent.

129S, 229S, 329S, 429S, 529S, 629S, 729S, 829S, 929S. Topics in Russian. This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Center for Global Educational Opportunities. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Slavic and Eurasian Studies. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

330. Topics in Russian Culture. Study of a selected aspect or aspects of Russian culture, including theatre, film, visual arts, folklore. Readings and lectures in English. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. May not be used to fulfill the foreign language requirement for any bachelor's degree. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: Contemporary Russian Culture. Same as European Studies 361 (Topic 3: Contemporary Russian Culture). Prerequisite: Upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

356. Russian Literature in Translation. A survey of nineteenth- and/or twentieth-century Russian literature. Lectures and readings in English. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. May not be used to fulfill the foreign language requirement for any bachelor's degree. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: The Russian Novel. Same as English 322 (Topic 37: The Russian Novel) and Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies 325 (Topic 9: The Russian Novel). European Studies 361 (Topic: The Russian Novel) and Russian 356 (Topic 1) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: For English majors, Rhetoric and Writing 306 and English 316K or their equivalents, and three additional semester hours of lower-division coursework in either English or rhetoric and writing; for others, upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

360. Study of an Individual Writer. Readings in translation of selected works of one major Russian writer. Conducted in English. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. May not be used to fulfill the foreign language requirement for any bachelor's degree. Prerequisite: For English majors, Rhetoric and Writing 306 and English 316K or their equivalents, and three additional semester hours of lower-division coursework in either English or rhetoric and writing; for others, upper-division standing.

369. Topics in Russian Linguistics. Introduction to selected topics in the structure or history of Russian. Conducted in English. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. May not be used to fulfill the foreign language requirement for any bachelor's degree. Prerequisite: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in Russian or consent of instructor.

379. Conference Course in Russian Language or Literature. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in Russian or consent of instructor and the chair of the department.

679H. Honors Tutorial Course. Supervised individual research on a literary or linguistic problem, which culminates in an honors paper of some length. Conference course for two semesters. Must be taken for special honors in addition to the major requirement. Prerequisite: For 679HA, upper-division standing, a University grade point average of at least 3.00, and a grade point average in Russian of at least 3.50; for 679HB, Russian 679HA.

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S C | Serbian/Croatian

Lower-Division Courses

506. First-Year Serbian/Croatian I. Emphasis on proficiency in four skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Five class hours a week for one semester.

507. First-Year Serbian/Croatian II. Emphasis on proficiency in four skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Five class hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Serbian/Croatian 506 or consent of instructor.

312K. Second-Year Serbian/Croatian I. Emphasis on proficiency in four skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Three class hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Serbian/Croatian 507 or consent of instructor.

312L. Second-Year Serbian/Croatian II. Emphasis on proficiency in four skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Three class hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Serbian/Croatian 312K or consent of instructor.

Upper-Division Courses

321. Introduction to Serbian/Croatian I. Designed to give qualified students a rapid introduction to the fundamentals of the language. May not be used to fulfill the foreign language requirement for any bachelor's degree. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and fulfillment of the foreign language requirement for the Bachelor of Arts degree, or consent of instructor.

322. Introduction to Serbian/Croatian II. Continuation of Serbian/Croatian 321. Designed to complete the student's study of the structure of the language and to introduce readings in Serbian and Croatian. May not be used to fulfill the foreign language requirement for any bachelor's degree. Prerequisite: Serbian/Croatian 321 or consent of instructor.

379. Conference Course in Serbian/Croatian. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Serbian/Croatian 321 and 322 and consent of instructor.

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SLA | Slavic

Lower-Division Courses

301. Introduction to Slavic Civilization. Introduction to selected topics in the cultures of the Slavic peoples. Conducted in English. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. May not be used to fulfill the foreign language requirement for any bachelor's degree.

119S, 219S, 319S, 419S, 519S, 619S, 719S, 819S, 919S. Topics in Slavic. This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Center for Global Educational Opportunities. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Slavic and Eurasian Studies. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Upper-Division Courses

320. Literature and Nationalism in the Balkans. Same as European Studies 361 (Topic 8: Literature and Nationalism in the Balkans). Examination of the literary and political movements among the Balkan nationalities in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies 325 (Topic: Literature and Nationalism in the Balkans) and Slavic 320 may not both be counted. May not be counted toward fulfillment of the foreign language requirement for any bachelor's degree. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

321. The Jewish Experience in Eastern Europe. A panorama of the sociocultural history of the Jews of Eastern Europe of the past three centuries. May not be counted toward fulfillment of the foreign language requirement for any bachelor's degree. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

324. Seminar on Slavic and East European Studies. Examination of selected topics in the cultures and societies of Central and Eastern Europe. Conducted in English. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. May not be counted toward fulfillment of the foreign language requirement for any bachelor's degree. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 2: Yiddish Drama and Film in Translation. Same as English 322 (Topic 34: Yiddish Drama and Film in Translation); Germanic Civilization 327E (Topic 8: Yiddish Drama and Film in Translation); Jewish Studies 361 (Topic 5: Yiddish Drama and Film in Translation); and Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies 325 (Topic 8: Yiddish Drama and Film in Translation). Jewish life in Poland and Russia before the Holocaust, and the transition to American Jewish life, as revealed in plays and films produced in Eastern Europe and in the United States. No knowledge of Yiddish is required. Prerequisite: For English majors, Rhetoric and Writing 306 and English 316K or their equivalents, and three additional semester hours of lower-division coursework in either English or rhetoric and writing; for others, upper-division standing.

325. Topics in Jewish Life and Culture in Eastern Europe. Study of a selected aspect or aspects of Jewish life in Eastern Europe—literature, theatre, visual arts, folklore, religious movements—with emphasis on relationships with Slavic and other East European cultures. Readings and lectures in English. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. May not be counted toward fulfillment of the foreign language requirement for any bachelor's degree. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: The New York Jew: A Literary Archetype. Study of Russian Jewish immigrants from 1880 to 1990, and exploration of the question of whether there is a Jewish American literature. Prerequisite: For English majors, nine semester hours of lower-division coursework in English, including English 316K or the equivalent; for others, upper-division standing.

129S, 229S, 329S, 429S, 529S, 629S, 729S, 829S, 929S. Topics in Slavic. This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Center for Global Educational Opportunities. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Slavic and Eurasian Studies. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

356. Slavic and East European Literatures in Translation. The nineteenth and twentieth centuries: representative works, chiefly prose. Conducted in English. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. May not be used to fulfill the foreign language requirement for any bachelor's degree. Prerequisite: For English majors, Rhetoric and Writing 306 and English 316K or their equivalents, and three additional semester hours of lower-division coursework in either English or rhetoric and writing; for others, upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

379. Conference Course in Slavic and East European Languages and Literatures. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and consent of instructor.

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Undergraduate Catalog | 2006-2008
College of Liberal Arts
page 37 of 41 in Chapter 10
« prev | next »
College of Liberal Arts Office of the Registrar University of Texas at Austin copyright 2006
Official Publications 15 Aug 2006