College of Natural Sciences Office of the Registrar University of Texas at Austin
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Undergraduate Catalog | 2006-2008
College of Natural Sciences
page 2 of 15 in Chapter 11
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Graduation

Special Requirements of the College of Natural Sciences

All students must fulfill the general requirements for graduation given in chapter 1. Students in the College of Natural Sciences must also fulfill the following requirements.

  1. The University requires that the student complete in residence at least sixty semester hours of the coursework counted toward the degree. For the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I, these sixty hours must include at least eighteen hours in the major. For all other degrees offered by the College of Natural Sciences, thirty of these sixty hours must be taken in the College of Natural Sciences or the College of Liberal Arts.
  2. All University students must complete in residence at least twenty-four of the last thirty semester hours counted toward the degree. For students seeking the Bachelor of Science in Clinical Laboratory Science, this rule applies to the academic work completed at the University.
  3. The University requires that at least six semester hours of advanced coursework in the major be completed in residence. Additional hours in the professional or major sequence in many cases are required by individual degree programs.
  4. An Air Force, Army, or Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps student who elects the basic and/or advanced program in air force science, military science, or naval science will not be approved for graduation until the student's government contract is completed or the student is released from the ROTC.
  5. A candidate for a degree must be registered in the College of Natural Sciences either in residence or in absentia the semester or summer session the degree is to be awarded. Graduation applications must be submitted no later than the date given in the academic calendar. Applications are submitted online.
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Applying for a Degree

An electronic degree audit is created for each student each semester. The student should view the audit through IDA, the University's Interactive Degree Audit system. The degree audit tells the student the courses he or she must take and the requirements he or she must fulfill to receive the degree. The degree audit normally provides an accurate statement of requirements, but the student is responsible for knowing the requirements for the degree as stated in a catalog under which he or she is entitled to graduate and for registering so as to fulfill all these requirements. The student should seek an official ruling in the Student Division Office before registering if in doubt about any requirement.

In the semester or summer session in which the degree is to be conferred, the candidate must be registered at the University and must file a graduation application form in the Student Division Office. This should be done during the first week of classes, if possible, but in no event later than the deadline to apply for an undergraduate degree; this date is given in the official academic calendar. No degree will be conferred unless the graduation application form has been filed on time.

Degrees

The College of Natural Sciences offers the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I, and several bachelor of science degrees. The requirements of the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I, begin below. For this degree students may major in any of the departments of the College of Liberal Arts or the College of Natural Sciences; these majors are listed in the section "Degree Programs" in chapter 1. The Bachelor of Arts, Plan II, a broad liberal arts honors program for outstanding students, is described in chapter 10. Plan II emphasizes the humanities but also permits a concentration equivalent to a major in science.

A student may not earn more than one Bachelor of Arts degree from the University.

The bachelor of science degrees are listed in chapter 1. The requirements of these degrees are given in this chapter.

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Marine Science Program

The Department of Marine Science does not offer an undergraduate degree. However, students who are interested in marine science may pursue the Bachelor of Science in Biology, option III, marine and freshwater biology. The department also offers a number of courses that may be counted toward bachelor's degree requirements; with the approval of his or her major department, any University student may minor in marine science.

Marine science courses are taught both on campus and at the Marine Science Institute at Port Aransas.

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Applicability of Certain Courses

Physical Activity Courses

Physical activity (PED) courses and Kinesiology 119 may not be counted toward a degree in the College of Natural Sciences. However, they are counted among courses for which the student is enrolled, and the grades are included in the grade point average.

ROTC Courses

ROTC units are maintained on campus by the Departments of Air Force Science, Military Science, and Naval Science. For information about each program, consult the chair of the department concerned.

Nine semester hours of coursework in air force science, military science, or naval science may be counted toward any degree in the College of Natural Sciences. Such credit may be used only as electives and/or to fulfill the substantial writing component requirement, and only by students who are commissioned by the University ROTC program.

Bible Courses

No more than twelve semester hours of Bible courses may be counted toward a degree.

Admission Deficiencies

Students admitted to the University with deficiencies in high school units must remove them by the means prescribed in General Information.

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Concurrent Enrollment

Credit that a University student in residence earns simultaneously by correspondence or extension from the University or elsewhere, or in residence at another school, will not be counted toward a degree in the College of Natural Sciences unless specifically approved in advance by the college. Students petition for approval online. No more than 30 percent of the semester hours required for any degree offered in the College of Natural Sciences may be taken by correspondence.

A student in his or her final semester may not enroll concurrently at another educational institution in any course that is to be counted toward the degree. All transfer coursework must be added to the student's academic record before his or her last semester.

Courses Taken on the Pass/Fail Basis

No more than sixteen semester hours taken on the pass/fail basis may be counted toward the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I. In general, only electives may be taken on the pass/fail basis. Complete rules on registration on the pass/fail basis are given in General Information.

Courses in a Single Field

No more than thirty-six hours may be counted in any one subject, including the major, unless major requirements state otherwise. No more than thirty-six hours may be counted in any one college or school other than the College of Liberal Arts or the College of Natural Sciences.

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Bachelor of Arts, Plan I

The requirements for the Bachelor of Arts under Plan I are designed to give each student flexibility in the selection of courses to meet individual needs.

Summary

The following is a brief overview of the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I; for detailed regulations see "Degree Requirements, Specific" below.

A total of 120 semester hours is required for the degree. Of the 120 hours, thirty-six must be in upper-division courses. At least sixty hours, including eighteen hours of upper-division coursework, and at least twenty-four of the last thirty hours must be taken in residence at the University. Provided residence rules are met, credit may be earned by examination, by extension, by correspondence (up to 30 percent of the hours required for the degree), or, with the approval of the dean, by work transferred from another institution. A maximum of sixteen semester hours of classroom and/or correspondence coursework may be taken on the pass/fail basis.

Three categories of work must be completed: prescribed work; major requirements, including minor requirements, if any; and electives to provide a total of 120 semester hours.

Prescribed Work

For all majors for the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I, there are four specific area requirements that make up about half of the degree program:

Area A (English composition and literature, writing, and foreign language): Rhetoric and Writing 306 and English 316K and two courses certified as having a substantial writing component are required. The foreign language requirement is stated in terms of proficiency; the actual number of hours varies with the language selected and previous knowledge of the language.

Area B (social sciences): Eighteen semester hours must be completed, including courses in four subjects. Of these eighteen hours, six hours must be in American history and six hours must be in American government, including Texas government.

Area C (natural sciences): Eighteen semester hours are required, including three hours of mathematics. Lists of courses that may be used to fulfill this requirement are available in the Student Division Office.

Area D (general culture): Six semester hours are required. Lists of courses that may be used to fulfill this requirement are available in the Student Division Office.

Courses in the major may be used to fulfill area requirements unless expressly prohibited. A course taken to meet the requirements of one area may not also be used to fulfill the requirements of another area. The only exception to this rule is that a course taken to fulfill another area requirement may also be used to fulfill the requirement for courses having a substantial writing component, if the course is so certified. No courses used to fulfill area requirements may be taken on the pass/fail basis.

Major

Each candidate must select a major. The number of semester hours required in the major varies with the field selected. Some majors require specific courses in other subjects as well. At least eighteen hours of coursework in the major, including six hours of upper-division coursework, must be completed in residence at the University.

Electives

The remaining coursework to make the required total of 120 semester hours consists of electives. A maximum of sixteen hours of elective work may be taken on the pass/fail basis.

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Degree Requirements, Specific

Specific requirements for the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I, are divided into four areas: A, B, C, and D. With the dean's approval, interdepartmental courses, courses offered by other colleges and schools of the University, and credit by examination may be used to meet these requirements; however, these courses may not be used to meet the requirements of special programs or majors without the approval of the program director or the department chair. A course taken to meet the requirements of one area may not also be used to fulfill the requirements of another area; the only exception to this rule is that a course taken to fulfill the Area A foreign language requirement or the Area B, C, or D requirement may also be counted toward the writing requirement in Area A, if the course is certified as having a substantial writing component. No courses used to fulfill area requirements may be taken on the pass/fail basis.

In addition to the following requirements, the student must fulfill the University requirements for graduation given in chapter 1 and the requirements of the College of Natural Sciences given in this chapter.

Prescribed Work

Area A, Language and Literature

English composition and literature: Rhetoric and Writing 306 and English 316K.

Writing: In addition to Rhetoric and Writing 306 and English 316K, in taking courses to fulfill other degree requirements, each student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component. One of these courses must be upper-division. If the writing requirement is not fulfilled by courses specified for the degree, the student must fulfill it either with electives or with coursework taken in addition to the number of hours required for the degree. Courses used to fulfill the writing requirement may be used simultaneously to fulfill other area requirements or major requirements. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.

Foreign language: Students must complete four semesters in a single foreign language.

The foreign language requirement is the attainment of a certain proficiency rather than the completion of a specified number of hours; however, the courses taken to gain this proficiency are not electives and may not be taken on the pass/fail basis. Any part of the requirement may be fulfilled by credit by examination. Students may accelerate their progress at any point in the sequence by means of credit by examination.

To achieve proficiency in a foreign language as rapidly as possible, qualified students are urged to take advantage of the intensive foreign language study program. Information about this program is available from the appropriate language department. Courses used to fulfill the foreign language requirement must be language courses; literature-in-translation courses, for example, may not be counted.

Area B, Social Sciences

Eighteen semester hours, distributed among at least four of the fields of study listed below. None of the courses used to fulfill Area B requirements may be taken on the pass/fail basis. Courses in anthropology, geography, linguistics, and psychology used to fulfill Area B requirements may not also be used to fulfill Area C requirements.

  1. Six hours in each of the following fields of study:
    1. American government, including Texas government
    2. American history
  2. Three hours each from any two of the following fields of study:
    1. Anthropology
    2. Economics
    3. Geography
    4. Linguistics
    5. Psychology
    6. Sociology
Area C, Natural Sciences

Each student must have credit for three semester hours in a course offered by the University of Texas at Austin Department of Mathematics, excluding Mathematics 301, 316K, and 316L. Algebra courses at the level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the Area C requirement or toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics 301 without degree credit to remove their deficiency.

Fifteen additional semester hours, with no more than nine in any one department, from the fields of study listed below. No more than nine hours of mathematics and computer sciences combined may be included in these fifteen hours. Nine of these fifteen hours must be taken in courses in the College of Natural Sciences or the Jackson School of Geosciences, items 1 through 10 below, with at least six hours taken in one subject from items 1 through 8; these nine hours may include no more than three hours of mathematics or computer sciences. The remaining six hours may be chosen from courses in the natural sciences listed below or from the list of approved alternative courses in subjects 11 through 16 that is available from the Student Division Office. Of these six hours, a maximum of three semester hours in courses in either the history of science or the philosophy of science may be used.

A course listed in two or more departments may be used as a course in only one department in fulfilling requirements under Area C. Courses in anthropology, geography, linguistics, and psychology used to fulfill Area C requirements may not also be used to fulfill Area B requirements. Courses in philosophy used to fulfill Area C requirements may not also be used to fulfill Area D requirements.

  1. Astronomy
  2. Biology
  3. Chemistry
  4. Geological sciences
  5. Marine science
  6. Nutrition
  7. Physical science
  8. Physics
  9. Mathematics
  10. Computer sciences
  11. Experimental psychology
  12. Physical anthropology
  13. Physical geography
  14. Philosophy (courses in logic)
  15. History of science and philosophy of science
  16. Other science courses approved by the dean

Students should confer with the staff in their advising center or the Student Division Office to determine which courses are included in items 11 through 16.

Students, counselors, and advisers are urged to make careful selection of Area C courses in order to develop a meaningful pattern and a coherent sequence.

Area D, General Culture

Six semester hours from the fields of study listed below. Three of these six hours must be chosen from subarea 1, 2, 3, or 4 (excluding courses in logic).

A student who uses Greek or Latin to meet the foreign language requirement may use additional coursework in the same language to meet the Area D requirement, but only courses beyond the fourth semester proficiency level may be used.

  1. Architecture
  2. Classics, including classical civilization, Greek, Latin
  3. Fine arts, including art history, design, ensemble, fine arts, instruments, music, studio art, theatre and dance, visual art studies
  4. Philosophy
  5. Approved interdisciplinary courses including, but not restricted to, those in programs of special concentration cutting across specific departments, schools, or colleges. Lists of approved courses are available in the advising centers and the Student Division Office.
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Special Requirements

Elective Requirements and Limitations

In addition to the area requirements given above and the major requirements given below, the student must take enough elective coursework to complete the 120 semester hours required for the degree. These 120 hours may include no more than twelve hours of Bible; nine hours of air force science, military science, or naval science; sixteen hours taken on the pass/fail basis; thirty-six hours in any one subject offered in the College of Natural Sciences or the College of Liberal Arts, unless major requirements state otherwise; and thirty-six hours in courses offered in any other single college or school of the University.

Minimum Scholastic Requirements

The student must earn a grade point average of at least 2.00 in all courses taken at the University of Texas at Austin (including credit by examination, correspondence, and extension) for which a grade or symbol other than Q, W, X, or CR is recorded; in addition, the student must earn a grade point average of at least 2.00 in courses taken at the University and counted toward the major requirement.

The student should also refer to the description of his or her major program in the section Majors and Minors below, since some majors include higher minimum scholastic requirements.

For more information about grades and the grade point average, see General Information.

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Concentrations

Within the general requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Arts and the requirements of the major, a student may also complete a concentration in cultural studies; science, technology, and society; or western civilization and American institutions. These concentrations, administered by the College of Liberal Arts, are described in chapter 10. Students may also pursue a concentration in actuarial studies, administered by the Department of Mathematics.

Majors and Minors

Major requirements. The Bachelor of Arts, Plan I, requires the completion of all requirements for one major. Requirements for majors offered by the College of Natural Sciences are given below; those for majors offered by the College of Liberal Arts are given in chapter 10.

The major subject is not shown on the diploma. It is not possible for a student to receive a second Bachelor of Arts degree from the University.

Advising of majors. A student who has chosen a major is advised in the advising center for his or her major before registration each semester. Students who have not chosen a major must be advised in the Student Division Office, College of Natural Sciences. For matters concerning degree requirements, specific academic problems, petitions, and academic advice in general, the student should consult his or her advising center or the Student Division Office, Will C. Hogg 2.112.

Hour requirements for the major. A major consists of at least twenty-one but no more than forty-two semester hours, with at least twelve hours in upper-division courses. Of these twelve semester hours, six must be taken in residence. These restrictions exist in the context of the general residence requirement for the major of eighteen semester hours.

Unless otherwise indicated, a course taken to fulfill the requirements under "Prescribed Work" may also be counted toward fulfillment of the major requirements.

A student who earns credit by examination with a grade of C or better will be given the appropriate grade and degree credit, including hours required in the major.

Minors. Most departments require completion of a minor to accompany the major. These requirements, if any, are given below.

Astronomy

Major: Physics 301, 101L, 315, 115L, 316, and 116L; nine semester hours of upper-division coursework in astronomy, including at least two of the following courses: Astronomy 352K, 352L, 353, 358, and 364; and six additional upper-division hours in astronomy and/or physics.

Minor for astronomy majors: Six semester hours of coursework (other than astronomy, lower-division physics, lower-division mathematics, and Mathematics 427K) approved by the undergraduate adviser; and either six semester hours of upper-division physics in addition to the courses used to fulfill the major requirement or six semester hours of upper-division coursework approved by the undergraduate adviser.

A grade of at least C is required in each semester of each course counted toward the major and minor requirements.

All astronomy majors should consult the astronomy undergraduate adviser regularly about the choice of appropriate courses in both the major and the minor. Qualified students are encouraged to carry out a supervised research project by taking a conference course, such as Astronomy 375 or 379H. No more than six of the hours counted toward the major requirement may be earned in conference courses.

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Biochemistry

Biochemistry majors must take either Mathematics 408C and 408D or Mathematics 408K, 408L, and 408M; and eight semester hours of physics: either Physics 301, 101L, 316, and 116L; 303K, 103M, 303L, and 103N; or 317K, 117M, 317L, and 117N.

Major: Chemistry 301 or 301H, 302 or 302H, 204 or 317; either 118K, 118L, 318M, and 318N, or 210C, 310M, and 310N; 339K, 339L, 353M, 153K, 455, 369L, and 370.

Minor for biochemistry majors: Biology 311C, 311D, and 325; six additional semester hours in biology, three of which are chosen from Biology 328, 339, 345, 361T, 365R or 371M, and 365S; and three additional hours chosen from the preceding list or from Biology 320, 126L and 226R, 226T, 330, 331L, 344, 347, 349, and 360K.

Biology

In addition to the requirements below, biology majors must complete Mathematics 408C or 408K; Chemistry 301, 302, and 204; and one of the following: (1) Chemistry 210C, 310M, and 310N; (2) eight hours of coursework in physics, including laboratory work; or (3) six hours of coursework in computer sciences, including at least three hours of upper-division work.

Major: The following coursework:

  1. Biology 311C, 311D, and 325.
  2. Biology 205L, 206L, 208L, or 309H.
  3. Eighteen semester hours of coursework, including three hours in each of the following areas; no course may be counted toward more than one area.
    1. Cellular, developmental, and molecular biology: Biology 320, 323L, 325L, 325T, 226R, 126L, 226T, 327, 127L, 328D, 330, 130L, 331L, 332, 333, 335, 336, 337 (Topic: Development and Evolution), 337J, 339, 339M, 343M, 344, 347, 349, 350M, 360K, 160L, 366, 366R, 367, 368L, 379G, 379J.
    2. Physiology, neurobiology, and behavior: Biology 322, 122L, 328, 128L, 329, 129L, 438L, 339, 345, 345E, 359J, 359K, 359R, 360K, 160L, 361, 361L, 361T, 365D, 365L, 465M, 365N, 365R, 365S, 365T, 365W, 371L, 371M.
    3. Ecology and evolution: Biology 321L, 340L, 342L, 448L, 351, 352, 353L, 354L, 455L, 456L, 357, 458L, 359, 359J, 262, 262L, 363, 364, 369L, 370, 471G, 472L, 373, 373L, 375, 376, Marine Science 352C, 354Q.
    4. Animal biology: Biology 321L, 438L, 340L, 345E, 448L, 353L, 354L, 455L, 359K, 359R, 361T, 369L, 478L, Marine Science 354, 354C.
    5. Plant biology: Biology 322, 122L, 324 and 124L, 327 and 127L, 328, 328D, 128L, 350M, 351, 352, 262, 262L, 363, 472L, 374 and 174L, Marine Science 352D.
    6. Microbiology: Biology 126L, 226R, 226T, 327, 127L, 329, 129L, 330, 130L, 333, 339, 364, Marine Science 354E.
  4. Three additional hours of coursework chosen from the following: the biology and marine science courses listed in areas a through f above; other upper-division biology courses; Chemistry 339K and 339L, or 369.
          The courses counted toward requirements 3 and 4 must include at least three laboratory courses. They may include three hours in undergraduate research or special studies courses. Another three hours in special studies courses may be counted as electives. The student must earn a grade of at least C in each course taken at the University and counted toward the major requirement.
Chemistry

Chemistry majors must take Mathematics 408C and 408D, or 408K, 408L, and 408M; and eight semester hours of physics: either Physics 30l, 101L, 316, and 116L; 303K, 103M, 303L, and 103N; or 317K, 117M, 317L, and 117N.

Major: Chemistry 301 or 301H, 302 or 302H, 204 or 317; either 210C, 310M, and 310N, or 118K, 118L, 318M, and 318N; 353, 153K, 354 or 354L, 154K, 456, 376K.

Minor for chemistry majors: Either (1) twelve semester hours of biology, geological sciences, mathematics, physics, or, with written consent of the department chair and approval of the dean, a field of study outside the College of Natural Sciences or the Jackson School of Geosciences; or (2) Computer Sciences 303E, 313E, and six hours chosen from Computer Sciences 323E, 324E, 326E, 327E, and 329E. Students who complete the second option may simultaneously fulfill the requirements of the Elements of Computing Program and may apply to the director of the program for a certificate of completion.

The student must complete each course in the major and the minor with a grade of at least C.

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Computer Sciences

An undergraduate may not enroll in any computer sciences course more than once without written consent of an undergraduate adviser in computer sciences. No student may enroll in any computer sciences course more than twice. No student may take more than three upper-division computer sciences courses in a semester without written consent of an undergraduate adviser in computer sciences.

Major: Computer Sciences 307, 310 or 310H, 313K or 313H, 315 or 315H, 336 or 336H, 337 or 337H, 341 or 341H, 352 or 352H, 372 or 372H, and at least twelve additional semester hours of approved upper-division coursework in computer sciences. [1] Computer Sciences 370 may be counted toward the degree only once.

Minor for computer sciences majors: Mathematics 408C, 408D, Electrical Engineering 316, and one of the following courses: Mathematics 427K, 328K, 340L, 341, 343K, 343L, 344K, 346, 348, 358K, 362K, 362M, 364K, 364L, 367K, 372K, 373K, 374G, 374K, 474M, 376C, 378K.

A grade of at least C is required in each course counted toward the major and minor requirements.

With the exception of Computer Sciences 307, 313K, and 315, all computer sciences courses that may be counted toward a degree in computer sciences are restricted to students who have been admitted to the computer sciences major or have the consent of the undergraduate faculty adviser.

Human Ecology

To fulfill the Area C requirement for the Bachelor of Arts, human ecology majors must complete Mathematics 305G, 408K, or 408C; Mathematics 316; either (a) Chemistry 301, 302, and Biology 311C, or (b) Chemistry 301 and Biology 311C and 311D; and two to four additional hours in astronomy, biology, chemistry, computer sciences, geological sciences, mathematics, and/or physics. Courses designed for nonscience majors may not be counted toward this requirement.

Major: Thirty semester hours of coursework in the Department of Human Ecology, including at least fifteen hours of upper-division coursework and at least six hours chosen from each of the following areas: (a) Human Development and Family Sciences 304, 312, 313, 113L, 315L, 322, and 337; (b) Nutrition 307, 107L, 311, 111L, 315, 316, 318, 332, and 338W; and (c) Textiles and Apparel 205, 105L, 316Q, 319, 325L, and 325M.

The student must earn a grade of at least C in each course in the major. To develop a meaningful and coherent degree program, the student should select courses with the assistance of faculty and academic advisers.

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Mathematics

Undergraduates seeking a Bachelor of Arts degree in mathematics must choose either the standard option or the middle grades or secondary school teaching option.

Major, standard option: At least twenty-four semester hours of upper-division coursework in mathematics. Mathematics 301, 302, 303D, 305G, and equivalent courses may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. The student must earn a grade of at least C in Mathematics 408C and 408D and in each mathematics course used to fulfill the major requirement.

The student must complete the following:

  1. Mathematics 408C and 408D.
  2. Mathematics 340L or 341.
  3. Mathematics 328K, 343K, or 373K.
  4. Mathematics 361K or 365C.
  5. Mathematics 362K.
  6. At least one course chosen from the following: Mathematics 333L, 339J, 343L, 343M, 344K, 348, 358K, 361, 367K, 368K, 372K, 474M, 376C, 378K. This requirement is intended to broaden the student's training.

Major, mathematics for middle grades and secondary school teaching options: At least twenty-four semester hours of upper-division coursework in mathematics. Mathematics 301, 302, 303D, 305G, and equivalent courses may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. The student must earn a grade of at least C in Mathematics 408C and 408D and in each mathematics course used to fulfill the major requirement.

The middle grades and secondary school teaching options are designed to give students the mathematical background appropriate for teaching middle grades and secondary school mathematics, but students must meet additional requirements, including grade point average requirements, to obtain certification. Lists of the combined requirements of the UTeach-Natural Sciences certification programs and these options are available from the UTeach-Natural Sciences academic adviser. The UTeach-Natural Sciences program is described in this chapter.

The student must complete the following:

  1. Mathematics 408C and 408D.
  2. Mathematics 340L or 341.
  3. Mathematics 315C, 325K, 333L, 358K, and 362K.
  4. Mathematics 326K or 360M or Science 360 (Topic: Math Domain). Students seeking middle grades mathematics certification must complete Mathematics 326K.
  5. Mathematics 361K or 365C.
  6. Mathematics 328K, 343K, or 373K.
Physics

Students majoring in physics must take Chemistry 301, 302, and 204.

Major: Physics 315, 115L, and at least sixteen semester hours of upper-division physics, including Physics 336K, 352K, and 453.

First minor for physics majors: Twelve semester hours of mathematics, of which six must be in upper-division coursework; the upper-division coursework must include three hours in differential equations.

Second minor for physics majors: Six semester hours, of which three must be in upper-division coursework, in any one of the following: biology, chemistry, geological sciences, philosophy, psychology; or in courses offered in the College of Education or the College of Engineering. Courses used to fulfill specific degree requirements other than the substantial writing component requirement may not also be used to fulfill this requirement.

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Undergraduate Catalog | 2006-2008
College of Natural Sciences
page 2 of 15 in Chapter 11
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College of Natural Sciences Office of the Registrar University of Texas at Austin copyright 2006
Official Publications 15 Aug 2006