College of Natural Sciences Office of the Registrar University of Texas at Austin
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Undergraduate Catalog | 2006-2008
College of Natural Sciences
page 4 of 15 in Chapter 11
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Bachelor of Science in Chemistry

Four degree plans lead to the Bachelor of Science in Chemistry. Option I, chemistry, is intended to prepare students for professional careers as chemists, either upon graduation or after graduate study in chemistry or related fields. Option II, computation, is intended to prepare students for the workplace by giving them opportunities to develop hands-on computation skills. Option III, teaching, is intended to prepare students to enter the teaching profession. Option IV, chemistry honors, is intended to prepare students for academic or research careers. (To follow option IV, students must complete the application process described in this chapter in the section "Dean's Scholars Honors Options.")

The four degree plans may also serve as the basis for work in many areas outside pure chemistry, such as materials science, medicine and other health-related fields, pharmacology, patent law, business, computation, or environmental science. After general chemistry courses, depending on his or her background, the student makes an intensive core study of some of the major areas of chemistry—organic, physical, inorganic, and analytical chemistry. The chemistry coursework in these degree plans culminates in approximately three semesters of advanced work, allowing each student to study more broadly by taking courses in some areas of chemistry not covered in the core courses, such as macromolecular chemistry, biochemistry, or other areas of physical chemistry, or more deeply by taking advanced special topics courses in areas of special interest and by undertaking research projects. Throughout the curricula, emphasis is placed on laboratory experience—synthesis, separations and analysis, structure identification and determination, measurement of rates of reactions, determinations of energy changes accompanying reactions. Supporting work in mathematics and physics is an integral part of the degree programs. Compared to the program leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree, the Bachelor of Science in Chemistry degree programs are more thorough and demanding and potentially more rewarding to the student planning a career in chemistry.

Prescribed Work Common to All Options

  1. Rhetoric and Writing 306 and English 316K. In addition, in taking courses to fulfill other degree requirements, the student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component; one of these courses must be upper-division. If the writing requirement is not fulfilled by courses specified for the degree, the student must fulfill it either with electives or with coursework taken in addition to the number of hours required for the degree. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.
  2. Options I and II: One of the following foreign language/culture choices. Students in options III and IV are exempt from this requirement. [5]
    1. Second-semester-level proficiency in a foreign language.
    2. First-semester-level proficiency in a foreign language and a three-semester-hour course in the culture of the same language area.
    3. Two three-semester-hour foreign culture courses chosen from a list available in the dean's office and the college advising centers.
  3. Six semester hours of American government, including Texas government.
  4. Six semester hours of American history.
  5. Three semester hours in anthropology, economics, geography, linguistics, psychology, or sociology.
  6. Three semester hours in architecture, art (including art history, design, studio art, visual art studies), classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts, music (including music, instruments, ensemble), philosophy (excluding courses in logic), or theatre and dance.
  7. The following courses:
    1. General chemistry: Chemistry 301 or 301H, 302 or 302H, and 317. Students in option IV must complete Chemistry 301H and 302H.
    2. Organic chemistry: Chemistry 118K, 118L, 318M, and 318N; or 210C, 310M, and 310N.
    3. Biochemistry: Chemistry 339K or 369.
    4. Physical chemistry: Chemistry 353, 153K, 154K, and either 354 or 354L.
    5. Inorganic chemistry: Chemistry 431.
    6. Analytical chemistry: Chemistry 456 and 376K.
  8. Thirty-six semester hours of upper-division coursework.
  9. At least eighteen semester hours of upper-division coursework, including at least twelve semester hours of upper-division coursework in chemistry, must be completed in residence at the University.
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Additional Prescribed Work for Each Option

Option I: Chemistry

  1. Mathematics 408C and 408D, or 408K, 408L, and 408M; and at least three semester hours of upper-division coursework in mathematics or computer sciences.
  2. One of the following sequences: Physics 301, 101L, 316, and 116L; 303K, 103M, 303L, and 103N; 317K, 117M, 317L, and 117N.
  3. Six semester hours chosen from the following courses: Chemistry 339L, 341,* 354, 367L, 368, 369K,* 369L,* 370, 371K,* 375K, and 475K. At least three of these six hours must be in a laboratory course; courses marked with an asterisk may be used to fulfill this laboratory requirement. Chemistry 341 and 368 may be repeated for credit toward this requirement when the topics vary. No more than three semester hours in Chemistry 369K may be counted toward this requirement; three additional hours may be counted as electives. No more than three semester hours in Chemistry 371K may be counted toward this requirement; three additional hours may be counted as electives.
  4. Nine semester hours of coursework in the College of Natural Sciences (excluding chemistry), the College of Engineering, and the Jackson School of Geosciences. Any course designed for science or engineering majors may be counted. With the exception of courses in the Elements of Computing Program, a course may not be used to fulfill this requirement if it cannot be counted toward major requirements in the department that offers it. No more than six hours of laboratory or field research from the Jackson School or any department in the College of Natural Sciences or the College of Engineering may be counted.
  5. Enough additional coursework to make a total of 127 semester hours.

Option II: Computation

Students who complete option II may simultaneously fulfill the requirements of the Elements of Computing Program and may apply to the director of the program for a certificate of completion.

  1. Mathematics 408C and 408D, or 408K, 408L, and 408M; and Mathematics 340L or 341 or three semester hours of upper-division coursework in computer sciences.
  2. One of the following sequences: Physics 301, 101L, 316, and 116L; 303K, 103M, 303L, and 103N; 317K, 117M, 317L, and 117N.
  3. Chemistry 368 (Topic: Computational Chemistry).
  4. One of the following laboratory courses: Chemistry 341, 369K, 369L, 371K.
  5. Twelve semester hours in the elements of computing, consisting of Computer Sciences 303E, 313E, and six hours chosen from Computer Sciences 323E, 324E, 326E, 327E, and 329E.
  6. Enough additional coursework to make a total of 127 semester hours. Students are encouraged to take additional chemistry courses as electives.

Option III: Teaching

This option is designed to fulfill the course requirements for certification as a middle grades or secondary school science teacher in Texas; the student chooses either composite science certification with chemistry as the primary teaching field or physical science certification. However, completion of the course requirements does not guarantee the student's certification. For information about additional requirements, consult the UTeach-Natural Sciences academic adviser.

  1. Mathematics 408C and 408D, or 408K, 408L, and 408M.
  2. To fulfill requirement 6 above, students must complete History 329U or Philosophy 329U.
  3. One of the following sequences: Physics 301, 101L, 316, and 116L; 303K, 103M, 303L, and 103N; 317K, 117M, 317L, and 117N.
  4. In place of requirement 7 above, students must complete at least thirty-four semester hours of chemistry, including the following courses:
    1. General chemistry: Chemistry 301, 302, and either 204 or 317.
    2. Organic chemistry: Chemistry 118K, 118L, 318M, and 318N; or 210C, 310M, and 310N.
    3. Biochemistry: Chemistry 339K and 339L, or Chemistry 369.
    4. Physical chemistry: Chemistry 353 or 353M.
    5. Analytical chemistry: Chemistry 455 or 456.
    6. Chemistry 368 (Topic: Research Methods—UTeach) or, with the consent of the UTeach-Natural Sciences academic adviser, an upper-division chemistry course that includes a substantial research component.
  5. One of the following:
    1. For composite science certification: (1) Biology 311C and 311D; (2) six hours of coursework in geological sciences; courses intended for nonscience majors may not be counted toward this requirement; (3) enough additional approved coursework in biology, geological sciences, or physics to provide the required twelve hours in a second field.
            The physics courses used to fulfill requirement 12 above are also counted toward composite science certification.
    2. For physical science certification: (1) to fulfill requirement 12 above, Physics 301, 101L, 316, and 116L; (2) Physics 315 and 115L; (3) Mathematics 427K and 427L; (4) Chemistry 153K, 354L, and 154K; (5) Physics 453 and three additional hours of upper-division coursework in physics.
  6. Eighteen semester hours of professional development coursework: Curriculum and Instruction 650S, UTeach-Natural Sciences 101, 110, 350, 355, 360, 170.
  7. Students seeking middle grades certification must complete the following courses: Educational Psychology 363M (Topic 3: Adolescent Development), or Psychology 301 and 304; and Curriculum and Instruction 371 (Topic 10: Secondary School Reading in the Content Subjects).
  8. Enough additional coursework, if needed, to make a total of 120 semester hours.

Option IV: Chemistry Honors

  1. Breadth requirement: An honors mathematics course, Chemistry 301H and 302H, Physics 301 and 316, and a three-semester-hour honors course in biology or computer sciences.
  2. Chemistry 317.
  3. Natural Sciences 301C.
  4. A section of Rhetoric and Writing 309S that is restricted to Dean's Scholars.
  5. Chemistry 379H and a three-semester-hour upper-division course approved by the departmental honors adviser.
  6. Twenty-five additional hours of coursework approved by the departmental honors adviser.
  7. Six semester hours of coursework in the College of Liberal Arts or the College of Fine Arts.
  8. Enough additional coursework to make a total of 120 semester hours.
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Special Requirements

The student must fulfill the University-wide graduation requirements given in chapter 1 and the college requirements given in this chapter. He or she must also earn a grade of at least C in each course in chemistry taken at the University and counted toward the prescribed work for the degree.

To graduate and be recommended for certification, students who follow the teaching option must have a University grade point average of at least 2.50. They must earn a grade of at least C in each of the professional development courses listed in requirement 15 and must pass the final teaching portfolio review; those seeking middle grades certification must also earn a grade of at least C in each of the courses listed in requirement 16. For information about the portfolio review and additional teacher certification requirements, consult the UTeach-Natural Sciences academic adviser.

To graduate under option IV, students must earn grades of A in the departmental research and thesis courses described in requirement 14 above and must present their research in an approved public forum, such as the annual College of Natural Sciences Poster Session. Students must also have a grade point average at graduation of at least 3.50 in coursework taken in residence at the University. Students who fail to maintain an in-residence grade point average of at least 3.25 will usually be academically dismissed from option IV; under special circumstances and at the discretion of the departmental honors adviser, a student may be allowed to continue under academic review.

Order and Choice of Work

Students are strongly recommended to take the chemistry/biochemistry–major sections of the following courses: Chemistry 301 or 301H (if taken), 302 or 302H, 118K, 118L, 318M, and 318N. Students planning a graduate program are strongly recommended to take Physics 301, 101L, 316, 116L, 315, and 115L.

Students in option II should consult the undergraduate adviser each semester regarding order and choice of work; those in option III should consult the UTeach-Natural Sciences academic adviser.

The following order of work is recommended as a typical minimum program for option I. It assumes that the student has high school credit in trigonometry, college algebra, and the first semester of general chemistry; is able to earn credit by examination for Chemistry 301; and is able to score well enough on the SAT Subject Test in Mathematics Level 1 to take Mathematics 408C in the first semester of the freshman year. Many students meet some of the following course requirements by credit by examination.

First year: Chemistry 302 or 302H, and 317; Mathematics 408C and 408D, or 408K, 408L, and 408M; Physics 301 and 101L, or 303K and 103M, or 317K and 117M (to be taken after Mathematics 408C); Rhetoric and Writing 306; three semester hours to fulfill requirement 5 and three hours to fulfill requirement 6 of the prescribed work.

Second year: Chemistry 118K, 118L, 318M, and 318N, or 210C, 310M, and 310N; any coursework needed to meet requirement 2 of the prescribed work; three semester hours to be counted toward requirement 13 of the prescribed work; English 316K; Physics 316 and 116L, or 303L and 103N, or 317L and 117N; an upper-division mathematics course (such as Mathematics 427K) or an upper-division computer sciences course.

Third year: Chemistry 339K or 369, 353, 153K, 354L, 456; six semester hours of American government; six semester hours of American history; three semester hours of electives; a three-semester-hour elective to fulfill requirement 1 of the prescribed work; three semester hours to be counted toward requirement 13 of the prescribed work.

Fourth year: Chemistry 431, 154K, 376K, and courses to fulfill requirement 12 of the prescribed work. The student must also take enough additional coursework to fulfill requirements 8, 9, 13, and 14 of the prescribed work. It is recommended that the majority of the elective courses taken to fulfill requirements 8 and 13 be chosen from upper-division courses in biology, chemistry, chemical engineering, mathematics, and physics.

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Bachelor of Science in Clinical Laboratory Science

The student preparing for a career in clinical laboratory science (medical technology) completes at least one hundred hours of academic work at the University. After this work is completed, the student enters an accredited school of clinical laboratory science (or medical technology) for an additional twelve to sixteen months of clinical education. After completion of this education, the student is awarded the Bachelor of Science in Clinical Laboratory Science and is eligible for national certifying examinations administered by the National Credentialing Agency for Laboratory Personnel (NCA) and the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP). Successful completion of these exams results in national certification as a clinical laboratory scientist or medical technologist.

The purpose of this degree program is to meet the increasing demand for laboratory professionals in hospital and clinic laboratories, research, industry, public health, education, and laboratory management. Clinical laboratory science is also an excellent foundation for graduate study in medicine, dentistry, management, education, and other disciplines.

Prescribed Work

  1. Rhetoric and Writing 306 and English 316K. In addition, in taking courses to fulfill other degree requirements, the student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component; one of these courses must be upper-division. If the writing requirement is not fulfilled by courses specified for the degree, the student must fulfill it either with electives or with coursework taken in addition to the number of hours required for the degree. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.
  2. One of the following foreign language/culture options: [6]
    1. Second-semester-level proficiency in a foreign language.
    2. First-semester-level proficiency in a foreign language and a three-semester-hour course in the culture of the same language area.
    3. Two three-semester-hour foreign culture courses chosen from a list available in the dean's office and the college advising centers.
  3. Six semester hours of American government, including Texas government.
  4. Six semester hours of American history.
  5. Three semester hours in anthropology, economics, geography, linguistics, psychology, or sociology.
  6. Mathematics 408C or 408K.
  7. Three semester hours in architecture, art (including art history, design, studio art, visual art studies), classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts, music (including music, instruments, ensemble), philosophy (excluding courses in logic), or theatre and dance.
  8. Biology 311C, 311D, 318M, 320 or 329 or 330, 325, 126L, 226R, 226T, 344, 360K, 160L, 361, 361L, and 365S.
  9. Chemistry 301, 302, 204, 210C, 310M, 310N, and 369.
  10. Eight semester hours of physics, in one of the following sequences: Physics 317K, 117M, 317L, and 117N; or 302K, 102M, 302L, and 102N.
  11. Enough additional elective coursework, if necessary, to make a total of at least one hundred semester hours of academic work completed at the University before the clinical education program.
  12. The completion of twelve to sixteen months of clinical education in a program of clinical laboratory science (or medical technology) accredited by the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Science (NAACLS). The student must apply to and be accepted into a clinical education program. The faculty adviser in the School of Biological Sciences and the clinical education program director work closely with each student to ensure his or her success in the program. Upon completion of the clinical education program, the student must submit a letter from the program director verifying completion of coursework and a transcript showing grades in all courses in the program to The University of Texas at Austin, Office of the Dean, College of Natural Sciences, 1 University Station G2500, Austin TX 78712. To be counted toward the degree, the coursework must be approved by the faculty adviser in the School of Biological Sciences and the dean. None of the coursework completed in the clinical education program may be used to fulfill in-residence degree requirements, requirements 1 through 11 of the prescribed work above, or the requirements for a second bachelor's degree.

Special Requirements

The student must fulfill the University-wide graduation requirements given in chapter 1 and the college requirements given in this chapter. He or she must also make a grade of at least C in each course used to fulfill requirements 8 and 12 of the prescribed work above.

Order and Choice of Work

The student should consult with his or her academic and faculty advisers each semester regarding order and choice of work and balancing the laboratory load. To complete the program within four years, it may be necessary for the student to take some courses during the summer.

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Bachelor of Science in Computer Sciences

The Bachelor of Science in Computer Sciences degree program provides a strong technical background for students planning to begin careers upon graduation and for those interested in graduate study in computer sciences. This program allows students to take more coursework in computer sciences and related technical areas than does the Bachelor of Arts degree program.

Students who would like to pursue the Bachelor of Science in Computer Sciences must first be admitted to the degree program. The admission process for option I is described in the section "Admission to the Department of Computer Sciences"; for option II, in the section "Turing Scholars in Computer Sciences"; and for option III, in the section "Dean's Scholars Honors Options."

Prescribed Work Common to All Options

  1. Rhetoric and Writing 306 and English 316K. In addition, in taking courses to fulfill other degree requirements, the student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component; one of these courses must be upper-division. If the writing requirement is not fulfilled by courses specified for the degree, the student must fulfill it either with electives or with coursework taken in addition to the number of hours required for the degree. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.
  2. Options I and II: One of the following foreign language/culture choices. Students in option III are exempt from this requirement. [7]
    1. Second-semester-level proficiency in a foreign language.
    2. First-semester-level proficiency in a foreign language and a three-semester-hour course in the culture of the same language area.
    3. Two three-semester-hour foreign culture courses chosen from a list available in the dean's office and the college advising centers.
  3. Six semester hours of American history.
  4. Six semester hours of American government, including Texas government.
  5. Three semester hours in psychology, anthropology, economics, sociology, geography, or linguistics (excluding Linguistics 340).
  6. Three semester hours in architecture, art (including art history, design, studio art, visual art studies), classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts, music (including music, instruments, ensemble), philosophy (excluding courses in logic), or theatre and dance. Courses in computer programming may not be used to fulfill this requirement.
  7. At least forty-two semester hours of upper-division coursework.
  8. At least eighteen semester hours of upper-division coursework in computer sciences must be completed in residence at the University.

Additional Prescribed Work for Each Option

Option I: Computer Sciences

  1. Mathematics 408C, 408D, either 340L or 341, and one of the following: Mathematics 427K, 328K, 343K, 343L, 344K, 346, 348, 358K, 362K, 362M, 364K, 364L, 367K, 372K, 373K, 374G, 374K, 474M, 376C, 378K.
  2. One of the following sequences of coursework:
    1. Biology 311C and 311D; and Biology 205L, 206L, or 208L.
    2. Chemistry 301, 302, and 204.
    3. Geological Sciences 401 and either 404C or 405.
    4. Physics 303K, 303L, 103M, and 103N.
  3. An additional sequence chosen from those in requirement 10 above, or one of the following sequences:
    1. Biology 325 and at least three hours of upper-division coursework in biology approved by the undergraduate adviser.
    2. Chemistry 118K, 118L, 318M, and 318N, or Chemistry 210C, 310M, and 310N, or at least six hours of upper-division coursework in chemistry approved by the undergraduate adviser.
    3. Geological Sciences 416K and 426P, or at least six hours of upper-division coursework in geological sciences approved by the undergraduate adviser.
    4. Physics 315 and at least three hours of upper-division coursework in physics approved by the undergraduate adviser.
    5. At least six hours of upper-division coursework in mathematics approved by the undergraduate adviser. A course may not be counted toward both requirement 10 and requirement 11.
    6. Electrical Engineering 313 and 331.
  4. Electrical Engineering 316.
  5. At least forty-five semester hours in computer sciences, consisting of Computer Sciences 307, 310, 313K, 315, 336, 337, 341, 345, 352, 372, and fifteen additional hours of approved upper-division coursework.
  6. Enough additional coursework to make a total of 130 semester hours.

Option II: Turing Scholars Honors

  1. Mathematics 408C, 408D, either 340L or 341, and one of the following: Mathematics 427K, 328K, 343K, 343L, 344K, 346, 348, 358K, 362K, 362M, 364K, 364L, 367K, 372K, 373K, 374G, 374K, 474M, 376C, 378K.
  2. One of the following sequences of coursework:
    1. Biology 311C and 311D; and Biology 205L, 206L, or 208L.
    2. Chemistry 301, 302, and 204.
    3. Geological Sciences 401 and either 404C or 405.
    4. Physics 303K, 303L, 103M, and 103N.
  3. An additional sequence chosen from those in requirement 10 above, or one of the following sequences.
    1. Biology 325 and at least three hours of upper-division coursework in biology approved by the undergraduate adviser.
    2. Chemistry 118K, 118L, 318M, and 318N, or Chemistry 210C, 310M, and 310N, or at least six hours of upper-division coursework in chemistry approved by the undergraduate adviser.
    3. Geological Sciences 416K and 426P, or six hours of upper-division coursework in geological sciences approved by the undergraduate adviser.
    4. Physics 315 and at least three hours of upper-division coursework in physics approved by the undergraduate adviser.
    5. At least six hours of upper-division coursework in mathematics approved by the undergraduate adviser. A course may not be counted toward both requirement 10 and requirement 11.
    6. Electrical Engineering 313 and 331.
  4. Electrical Engineering 316.
  5. Computer Sciences 310 or 310H, 313K or 313H, and 315 or 315H.
  6. At least thirty-four semester hours of upper-division coursework in computer sciences, including Computer Sciences 336 or 336H, 337 or 337H, 341 or 341H, 345 or 345H, 352 or 352H, 372 or 372H, 178H, and 379H. [8] The courses the student chooses to fulfill this requirement must be approved by the Turing Scholars program director; at least five of them, in addition to Computer Sciences 178H and 379H, must be honors courses. The honors thesis the student completes in Computer Sciences 379H must be approved by the program director.
  7. Enough additional coursework to make a total of 130 semester hours.

Option III: Computer Sciences Honors

  1. Breadth requirement: An honors mathematics course; Computer Sciences 310H, 313H, and 315H; and six semester hours chosen from the following courses, including coursework in two fields of study: Biology 315H, 325H, Chemistry 301, 302, Physics 301, 315, 316.
  2. At least six semester hours of upper-division coursework in mathematics approved by the undergraduate adviser.
  3. Computer Sciences 336H, 352H, 372H, and twelve additional hours of upper-division coursework in computer sciences. [8]
  4. Natural Sciences 301C.
  5. A section of Rhetoric and Writing 309S that is restricted to Dean's Scholars.
  6. Computer Sciences 379H and a three-semester-hour upper-division research course approved by the departmental honors adviser.
  7. Thirty-one additional semester hours of coursework approved by the departmental honors adviser.
  8. Six semester hours of coursework in the College of Liberal Arts or the College of Fine Arts.
  9. Enough additional coursework to make a total of 120 semester hours.

Special Requirements

The student must fulfill the University-wide graduation requirements given in chapter 1 and the college requirements given in this chapter. He or she must also make a grade of at least C in each course in computer sciences used to fulfill the prescribed work requirements for his or her option; students in options I and II must also earn a grade of at least C in each course used to fulfill requirements 9 and 12 of the prescribed work.

With the exception of Computer Sciences 307, 313K, and 315, all computer sciences courses that may be counted toward a degree in computer sciences are restricted to students who have been admitted to the computer sciences major or have the consent of the undergraduate faculty adviser.

An undergraduate may not enroll in any computer sciences course more than once without written consent of an undergraduate adviser in computer sciences. No student may enroll in any computer sciences course more than twice. No student may take more than three upper-division computer sciences courses in a semester without written consent of an undergraduate adviser in computer sciences.

Students in the Turing Scholars program must maintain a University grade point average of at least 3.50; like all students, they must also know and abide by the academic and disciplinary policies given in this catalog and in General Information. Those who fail to do so will be considered for academic dismissal from the Turing Scholars program. Under special circumstances and at the discretion of the director, a student will be allowed to continue in the program under academic review. A student who is academically dismissed from the program may enter another computer sciences program if he or she fulfills the scholastic standards for continuance in the University given in General Information. Students in scholastic difficulty should discuss their problems with a Turing Scholars program academic adviser and the director.

To graduate under option III, students must earn grades of A in the departmental research and thesis courses described in requirement 14 above and must present their research in an approved public forum, such as the annual College of Natural Sciences Poster Session. Students must also have a grade point average at graduation of at least 3.50 in coursework taken in residence at the University. Students who fail to maintain an in-residence grade point average of at least 3.25 will usually be academically dismissed from option III; under special circumstances and at the discretion of the departmental honors adviser, a student may be allowed to continue under academic review.

Order and Choice of Work

The student must consult the faculty adviser each semester regarding order and choice of work.

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Bachelor of Science in Human Development and Family Sciences

The Bachelor of Science in Human Development and Family Sciences focuses on the study of human development, individuals in a family context, relationships, and well-being within the family and the broader social, economic, community, and governmental environment. Students in the program are expected to develop knowledge and understanding about human development and family dynamics through classroom experiences, observation of children and families, and research. They have opportunities to apply their knowledge through practicum experiences in research and placements in the field. The program is designed to give students excellent preparation for graduate training that leads to careers in academia, research, medicine, and other health professions, as well as for employment in a field involving work with children, families, and adults.

Students seeking the Bachelor of Science in Human Development and Family Sciences must choose one of six options: option I, early childhood; option II, human development; option III, families and personal relationships; option IV, families and society; option V, general human development and family sciences; and option VI, human development and family sciences honors. Option V is limited to students with an in-residence University grade point average of at least 3.00, credit for Human Development and Family Sciences 304, 312, 313, 113L, and 315L with a grade of at least C in each, and consent of the faculty undergraduate adviser in human development and family sciences; admission to option VI requires completion of the application process described in this chapter in the section "Dean's Scholars Honors Options."

Prescribed Work Common to All Options

  1. Rhetoric and Writing 306 and English 316K. In addition, in taking courses to fulfill other degree requirements, the student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component; one of these courses must be upper-division. If the writing requirement is not fulfilled by courses specified for the degree, the student must fulfill it either with electives or with coursework taken in addition to the number of hours required for the degree. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.
  2. Students who enter the University with fewer than two high school units in a single foreign language must take the first two semesters in a language without degree credit to remove their language deficiency.
  3. Six semester hours of American government, including Texas government; six semester hours of American history; Psychology 301; and six semester hours, at least three of which must be upper-division, chosen from courses in economics, social or cultural anthropology, and psychology. Neither Psychology 304 nor 333D may be counted toward this degree.
  4. Three semester hours in architecture, art (including art history, design, studio art, visual art studies), classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts, music (including music, instruments, ensemble), philosophy (excluding courses in logic), or theatre and dance.
  5. At least thirty-six semester hours of upper-division coursework.
  6. Eighteen semester hours in the Department of Human Ecology must be completed in residence at the University.

Additional Prescribed Work for Each Option

Option I: Early Childhood

This option is designed to provide the necessary foundation for further study or a career in working with children in applied settings.

  1. Educational Psychology 371 or Mathematics 316; Mathematics 408C or 408K.
  2. Chemistry 301 or 313N; Biology 311C; Biology 311D or Chemistry 302 or 314N; and three additional semester hours of coursework in astronomy, biology, chemistry, computer sciences, geological sciences, mathematics, nutrition (other than Nutrition 311), or physics. Courses designed for nonscience majors may not be counted toward this requirement; students should consult the Department of Human Ecology for a list of courses that may be counted.
  3. Nine semester hours from an approved list of supporting courses available from the Department of Human Ecology. Students should confer with their advisers about courses appropriate to their career goals.
  4. Thirty-one semester hours in the Department of Human Ecology, consisting of Nutrition 311; Human Development and Family Sciences 304, 312, 313, 113L, 315L, and 360; six hours chosen from Human Development and Family Sciences 352, 652F, 352L, 652P, and 355; and six additional hours of coursework in human development and family sciences. Registration for Human Development and Family Sciences 352, 652F, 352L, 652P, and 355 is restricted to students whose applications have been approved. Applications for these courses may be obtained in the human development and family sciences division office; application deadlines are May 1 for enrollment the following spring semester and December 1 for enrollment the following fall semester.
  5. Nine additional semester hours chosen from Human Development and Family Sciences 338, 339, 351, 366, 378K (Topic 6: Introduction to Early Childhood Intervention), and 378L.
  6. Enough additional coursework to make a total of 126 semester hours.

Option II: Human Development

This option involves the study of development across the lifespan.

  1. Educational Psychology 371 or Mathematics 316; Mathematics 408C or 408K.
  2. Chemistry 301 or 313N; Biology 311C; Biology 311D or Chemistry 302 or 314N; and three additional semester hours of coursework in astronomy, biology, chemistry, computer sciences, geological sciences, mathematics, nutrition (other than Nutrition 311), or physics. Courses designed for nonscience majors may not be counted toward this requirement; students should consult the Department of Human Ecology for a list of courses that may be counted.
  3. Nine semester hours from an approved list of supporting courses available from the Department of Human Ecology. Students should confer with their advisers about courses appropriate to their career goals.
  4. Thirty-one semester hours in the Department of Human Ecology, consisting of Nutrition 311; Human Development and Family Sciences 304, 312, 313, 113L, 315L, and 360; six hours chosen from Human Development and Family Sciences 352, 652F, 352L, 652P, and 355; and six additional hours of coursework in human development and family sciences. Registration for Human Development and Family Sciences 352, 652F, 352L, 652P, and 355 is restricted to students whose applications have been approved. Applications for these courses may be obtained in the human development and family sciences division office; application deadlines are May 1 for enrollment the following spring semester and December 1 for enrollment the following fall semester.
  5. Nine additional semester hours chosen from Human Development and Family Sciences 335, 345, 351, 371, 372K, and 378L.
  6. Enough additional coursework to make a total of 126 semester hours.

Option III: Families and Personal Relationships

This option involves the study of the formation and maintenance of close relationships, especially couple and family relationships.

  1. Educational Psychology 371 or Mathematics 316; Mathematics 408C or 408K.
  2. Chemistry 301 or 313N; Biology 311C; Biology 311D or Chemistry 302 or 314N; and three additional semester hours of coursework in astronomy, biology, chemistry, computer sciences, geological sciences, mathematics, nutrition (other than Nutrition 311), or physics. Courses designed for nonscience majors may not be counted toward this requirement; students should consult the Department of Human Ecology for a list of courses that may be counted.
  3. Nine semester hours from an approved list of supporting courses available from the Department of Human Ecology. Students should confer with their advisers about courses appropriate to their career goals.
  4. Thirty-one semester hours in the Department of Human Ecology, consisting of Nutrition 311; Human Development and Family Sciences 304, 312, 313, 113L, 315L, and 360; six hours chosen from Human Development and Family Sciences 352, 652F, 352L, 652P, and 355; and six additional hours of coursework in human development and family sciences. Registration for Human Development and Family Sciences 352, 652F, 352L, 652P, and 355 is restricted to students whose applications have been approved. Applications for these courses may be obtained in the human development and family sciences division office; application deadlines are May 1 for enrollment the following spring semester and December 1 for enrollment the following fall semester.
  5. Nine additional semester hours chosen from Human Development and Family Sciences 322, 337, 345, 347, 358, and 372K.
  6. Enough additional coursework to make a total of 126 semester hours.
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Option IV: Families and Society

This option involves the study of the family and its interactions with larger socioeconomic systems, such as the economy, work, the media, public policy, and government.

  1. Educational Psychology 371 or Mathematics 316; Mathematics 408C or 408K.
  2. Chemistry 301 or 313N; Biology 311C; Biology 311D or Chemistry 302 or 314N; and three additional semester hours of coursework in astronomy, biology, chemistry, computer sciences, geological sciences, mathematics, nutrition (other than Nutrition 311), or physics. Courses designed for nonscience majors may not be counted toward this requirement; students should consult the Department of Human Ecology for a list of courses that may be counted.
  3. Nine semester hours from an approved list of supporting courses available from the Department of Human Ecology. Students should confer with their advisers about courses appropriate to their career goals.
  4. Thirty-one semester hours in the Department of Human Ecology, consisting of Nutrition 311; Human Development and Family Sciences 304, 312, 313, 113L, 315L, and 360; six hours chosen from Human Development and Family Sciences 352, 652F, 352L, 652P, and 355; and six additional hours of coursework in human development and family sciences. Registration for Human Development and Family Sciences 352, 652F, 352L, 652P, and 355 is restricted to students whose applications have been approved. Applications for these courses may be obtained in the human development and family sciences division office; application deadlines are May 1 for enrollment the following spring semester and December 1 for enrollment the following fall semester.
  5. Nine additional semester hours chosen from Human Development and Family Sciences 322, 339, 347, 354, 362, 375, 378K (Topic 5: Media and the Family), and 378K (Topic 6: Introduction to Early Childhood Intervention).
  6. Enough additional coursework to make a total of 126 semester hours.

Option V: General Human Development and Family Sciences

This option allows the student to individualize the degree plan to match his or her career goals. Option V is limited to students with an in-residence University grade point average of at least 3.00, credit for Human Development and Family Sciences 304, 312, 313, 113L, and 315L with a grade of at least C in each, and consent of the faculty undergraduate adviser.

  1. Educational Psychology 371 or Mathematics 316; Mathematics 408C or 408K.
  2. Chemistry 301 or 313N; Biology 311C; Biology 311D or Chemistry 302 or 314N; and three additional semester hours of coursework in astronomy, biology, chemistry, computer sciences, geological sciences, mathematics, nutrition (other than Nutrition 311), or physics. Courses designed for nonscience majors may not be counted toward this requirement; students should consult the Department of Human Ecology for a list of courses that may be counted.
  3. Nine semester hours from an approved list of supporting courses available from the Department of Human Ecology. Students should confer with their advisers about courses appropriate to their career goals.
  4. Thirty-one semester hours in the Department of Human Ecology, consisting of Nutrition 311; Human Development and Family Sciences 304, 312, 313, 113L, 315L, and 360; six hours chosen from Human Development and Family Sciences 352, 652F, 352L, 652P, and 355; and six additional hours of coursework in human development and family sciences. Registration for Human Development and Family Sciences 352, 652F, 352L, 652P, and 355 is restricted to students whose applications have been approved. Applications for these courses may be obtained in the human development and family sciences division office; application deadlines are May 1 for enrollment the following spring semester and December 1 for enrollment the following fall semester.
  5. Nine additional semester hours in human development and family sciences.
  6. Enough additional coursework to make a total of 126 semester hours.

Option VI: Human Development and Family Sciences Honors

This option is designed to prepare students for academic or research careers.

  1. Breadth requirement: An honors mathematics course; Biology 315H and 325H; Chemistry 301H and 302H; and either a three-semester-hour honors-designated computer sciences course or Physics 301, 316, or 315.
  2. Human Ecology 115H and 225H.
  3. Human Development and Family Sciences 304, 312, 313, 113L, 315L, and eighteen semester hours chosen from the following: Human Development and Family Sciences 335, 337, 345, 347, 351, 358, 362, 371, 372K, 378L, and approved social science courses.
  4. Natural Sciences 301C.
  5. A section of Rhetoric and Writing 309S that is restricted to Dean's Scholars.
  6. Human Development and Family Sciences 379H and a three-semester-hour upper-division research course approved by the departmental honors adviser.
  7. Twenty additional semester hours of coursework approved by the departmental honors adviser.
  8. Six hours of coursework in the College of Liberal Arts or the College of Fine Arts.
  9. Enough additional coursework to make a total of 120 semester hours.

Special Requirements

All students must fulfill the University-wide graduation requirements given in chapter 1 and the college requirements given in this chapter. They must also make a grade of at least C in each course in the Department of Human Ecology that is counted toward the degree. Students in options I through V must also make a grade of at least C in each course used to fulfill requirement 10 of the prescribed work for the option.

To graduate under option VI, students must earn grades of A in the departmental research and thesis courses described in requirement 12 above and must present their research in an approved public forum, such as the annual College of Natural Sciences Poster Session. Students must also have a grade point average at graduation of at least 3.50 in coursework taken in residence at the University. Students who fail to maintain an in-residence grade point average of at least 3.25 will usually be academically dismissed from option VI; under special circumstances and at the discretion of the departmental honors adviser, a student may be allowed to continue under academic review.

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Undergraduate Catalog | 2006-2008
College of Natural Sciences
page 4 of 15 in Chapter 11
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College of Natural Sciences Office of the Registrar University of Texas at Austin copyright 2006
Official Publications 15 Aug 2006