College of Natural Sciences Office of the Registrar University of Texas at Austin
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Undergraduate Catalog | 2006-2008
College of Natural Sciences
page 11 of 15 in Chapter 11
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Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

Placement in Chemistry

Students seeking the degree of Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering, Bachelor of Science in Chemistry, or Bachelor of Science in Physics must take the University of Texas at Austin Test for Credit in Chemistry 301 if they were admitted to the University with high school credit in chemistry. Engineering majors in areas other than chemical engineering are encouraged to take the test. Students with three semesters or more of high school chemistry that included laboratory experience, or credit for Chemistry 301, are encouraged to take the University of Texas at Austin Test for Credit in Chemistry 302. These tests are offered only in Austin. Information about these tests is available from the Division of Instructional Innovation and Assessment, The University of Texas at Austin, P O Box 7246, Austin TX 78713-7246.

Each student planning to register for a chemistry course should consult an adviser in his or her major area to determine whether specific courses are required. Chemistry 304K and 305 may apply toward degree requirements such as those in Area C of the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I.

Unless otherwise stated below, each course meets for three lecture hours a week for one semester.

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BCH | Biochemistry

Lower-Division Course

119S, 219S, 319S, 419S, 519S, 619S, 719S, 819S, 919S. Topics in Biochemistry. This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Center for Global Educational Opportunities. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Upper-Division Course

129S, 229S, 329S, 429S, 529S, 629S, 729S, 829S, 929S. Topics in Biochemistry. This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Center for Global Educational Opportunities. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

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CH | Chemistry

The information in parentheses after a course number is the Texas Common Course Numbering (TCCN) designation. Only TCCN designations that are exact semester-hour equivalents of University courses are listed here. Additional TCCN information is given in Appendix A.

Lower-Division Courses

301 (TCCN: CHEM 1311). Principles of Chemistry I. Some sections also require one enrichment/discussion hour a week; these are identified in the Course Schedule. Chemistry 301 and 301H may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Mathematics 408C or 408K.

301H. Principles of Chemistry I: Honors. Chemistry 301 and 301H may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Mathematics 408C or 408K, and consent of the departmental honors adviser.

302 (TCCN: CHEM 1312). Principles of Chemistry II. Development and application of concepts, theories, and laws underlying chemistry. Some sections also require one enrichment/discussion hour a week; these are identified in the Course Schedule. Chemistry 302 and 302H may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Chemistry 301 or 301H with a grade of at least C, and credit or registration for Mathematics 408C or 408K.

302H. Principles of Chemistry II: Honors. Chemistry 302 and 302H may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Chemistry 301 or 301H with a grade of at least C, Mathematics 408C or 408K with a grade of at least C, and consent of the departmental honors adviser.

303. Mathematical Introduction to Theories of Matter. Introduction to the quantum theoretic description of atoms, molecules, solids, nuclei, elementary particles, and cosmology. Matrix mechanics and group theory. Chemistry 303 may be used instead of either Chemistry 302 or Chemistry 301 and 302 in fulfilling the prerequisites of other chemistry courses, except by students seeking the Bachelor of Science in Chemistry degree. Chemistry 303 may be counted in addition to Chemistry 301 and 302. Not recommended by the Health Professions Office for Medical College Admission Test preparation.

204 (TCCN: CHEM 1111 and 1112 combined). Introduction to Chemical Practice. Introductory laboratory course in chemistry. Four laboratory hours and one hour of discussion a week for one semester. Some sections may also require one hour of computer laboratory a week; these are identified in the Course Schedule. Chemistry 204 and 317 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Chemistry 302.

304K. Chemistry in Context I. Designed for nonscience majors. Chemistry 304K and 305 form a two-semester sequence designed to fulfill the science requirement for students not majoring in science or engineering. Issues of contemporary interest and importance, such as ozone depletion and global warming, motivate the discussion; the underlying chemistry is developed as needed. Social, political, economic, and ethical implications of scientific developments and science policy are considered. Chemistry 304K addresses the nature of matter, energy, chemical reactions, and chemical thermodynamics. May not be counted toward any chemistry or biochemistry degree. May not be counted by students who have earned a grade of C or better in Chemistry 301. Not intended as preparation for Chemistry 301.

305. Chemistry in Context II. Designed for nonscience majors. Chemistry 304K and 305 form a two-semester sequence designed to fulfill the science requirement for students not majoring in science or engineering. Chemistry 305 addresses nuclear reactions, alternative energy sources, elementary organic chemistry, polymers, pharmaceuticals, nutrition, and genetics. May not be counted toward any chemistry or biochemistry degree. May not be counted by students who have earned a grade of C or better in Chemistry 302. Prerequisite: Chemistry 301 or 304K.

206K. Undergraduate Research. Introduction to research practices; supervised individual undergraduate research in chemistry. Six to ten laboratory hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit, but no more than four semester hours may be counted toward a degree in chemistry or biochemistry. Hours beyond four must be taken on the pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: Consent of the undergraduate adviser in chemistry.

107, 207. Conference Course. Supervised study in chemistry. One discussion hour a week for one semester, with additional hours to be arranged. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Some sections are offered on the pass/fail basis only; these are identified in the Course Schedule. May not be counted toward a major or minor in chemistry or biochemistry. Prerequisite: Written consent of instructor.

207K. Introduction to Science Outreach in Elementary Schools. Students develop and present level-appropriate science laboratories to students in local elementary schools. A hands-on, discovery learning approach to science is emphasized. One class hour and four hours of fieldwork a week for one semester. May be counted as an elective only. Prerequisite: Consent of the UTeach adviser in the College of Natural Sciences.

207L. Peer Teaching. Students act as peer teaching assistants in other University chemistry courses, mainly large general chemistry lecture sections. Two hours of lecture and training a week for one semester, and two to three hours a week leading student group discussions. May not be counted toward any degree in chemistry or biochemistry. Prerequisite: Chemistry 301 and consent of the coordinator of the Peer Teaching Assistant Program.

210C. Organic Chemistry Laboratory. Primarily for premedical, predental, life sciences, and pharmacy majors. One lecture hour and five laboratory hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Chemistry 210C, 110L, 118L. Prerequisite: Chemistry 204 or 317 with a grade of at least C, Chemistry 310M (or 610A) with a grade of at least C, and credit or registration for Chemistry 310N (or credit for 610B).

110K (TCCN: CHEM 2123). Organic Chemistry Laboratory. Primarily for premedical, predental, life sciences, and pharmacy majors. One lecture hour and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. May not be counted by students with credit for Chemistry 210C. Chemistry 110K and 118K may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Chemistry 302 and 204 with a grade of at least C in each, and credit or registration for Chemistry 310M (or credit for 610A).

110L (TCCN: CHEM 2125). Organic Chemistry Laboratory. Primarily for premedical, predental, life sciences, and pharmacy majors. One lecture hour and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Chemistry 210C, 110L, 118L. Prerequisite: Chemistry 310M (or 610A) with a grade of at least C, 110K, and credit or registration for Chemistry 310N (or credit for 610B).

310M (TCCN: CHEM 2323). Organic Chemistry I. Primarily for premedical, predental, life sciences, and pharmacy majors. The development of organic chemical structure, nomenclature, and reactivity. Only one of the following may be counted: Chemistry 610A, 310M, 618A, 318M. Prerequisite: Chemistry 302 with a grade of at least C, and credit or registration for Chemistry 204 or 317.

310N (TCCN: CHEM 2325). Organic Chemistry II. Primarily for premedical, predental, life sciences, and pharmacy majors. The development of organic chemical reactivity, with a focus on carbohydrates, proteins, and nucleic acids. Only one of the following may be counted: Chemistry 610B, 310N, 618B, 318N. Prerequisite: Chemistry 204 or 317 with a grade of at least C, Chemistry 310M (or 610A) with a grade of at least C, and credit or registration for Chemistry 210C.

313N. General and Organic Chemistry. Recommended for human ecology and nursing students. Introduction to chemical principles and organic chemistry, with emphasis on compounds of biological importance. May not be counted by students with credit for Chemistry 610, 618, or an equivalent organic chemistry course. May not be counted toward any chemistry degree.

113P. General and Organic Chemistry Laboratory. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Chemistry 304K or 313N.

314N. Elementary Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry. A one-semester biochemistry course for human ecology and nursing students. May not be counted by students with credit for Chemistry 339K. May not be counted toward any chemistry degree. Prerequisite: Chemistry 313N, or Chemistry 310M (or 610A), 310N (or 610B), 110K, and 110L.

114P. Elementary Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry Laboratory. Introduction to biochemical laboratory procedures. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Chemistry 113P and credit or registration for Chemistry 314N.

317. Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry for Chemistry and Biochemistry Majors. Synthesis and properties of inorganic, bioinorganic, and organometallic compounds. One lecture hour and six laboratory hours a week for one semester. Chemistry 204 and 317 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Chemistry 302.

118K. Organic Chemistry Laboratory. Primarily for chemistry and chemical engineering majors. One lecture hour and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. May not be counted by students with credit for Chemistry 210C. Chemistry 110K and 118K may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Chemistry 302 and either 204 or 317 with a grade of at least C in each, and credit or registration for Chemistry 318M (or credit for 618A).

118L. Organic Chemistry Laboratory. Primarily for chemistry and chemical engineering majors. One lecture hour and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Chemistry 210C, 110L, 118L. Prerequisite: Chemistry 318M (or 618A) with a grade of at least C, 118K, and credit or registration for Chemistry 318N (or credit for 618B).

318M. Organic Chemistry I. Primarily for chemistry and chemical engineering majors. The development of organic chemical structure, nomenclature, and reactivity. Only one of the following may be counted: Chemistry 610A, 310M, 618A, 318M. Prerequisite: Chemistry 302 and either Chemistry 204 or 317 with a grade of at least C in each, and credit or registration for Chemistry 118K.

318N. Organic Chemistry II. Primarily for chemistry and chemical engineering majors. The development of organic chemical reactivity, with an emphasis on synthesis and polymers. Only one of the following may be counted: Chemistry 610B, 310N, 618B, 318N. Prerequisite: Chemistry 318M (or 618A) with a grade of at least C, Chemistry 118K with a grade of at least C, and credit or registration for Chemistry 118L.

119S, 219S, 319S, 419S, 519S, 619S, 719S, 819S, 919S. Topics in Chemistry. This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Center for Global Educational Opportunities. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

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Upper-Division Courses

129S, 229S, 329S, 429S, 529S, 629S, 729S, 829S, 929S. Topics in Chemistry. This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Center for Global Educational Opportunities. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

329W. Cooperative Chemistry/Biochemistry. This course covers the work period of chemistry and biochemistry students in the Cooperative Education program, which provides supervised work experience by arrangement with the employer and the supervising instructor. Forty laboratory hours a week for one semester. The student must repeat the course each work period and must take it twice to receive credit toward the degree; at least one of these registrations must be during a long-session semester. No more than three semester hours may be counted toward the major requirement; no more than six semester hours may be counted toward the degree. The student's first registration must be on the pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: Chemistry 310N (or 610B) or 318N (or 618B) with a grade of at least C, application to become a member of the Cooperative Chemistry/Biochemistry Program, and consent of the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry undergraduate adviser.

431. Inorganic Chemistry. Survey of the chemistry of the elements, incorporating both descriptive and theoretical aspects. Open-ended experiments designed to illustrate a variety of synthetic techniques. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Chemistry 302, and either Chemistry 204 or 317 with a grade of at least C.

339K. Biochemistry I. Chemistry 339K and 339L should be taken as a two-semester sequence. Students who do not plan to take Chemistry 339L should register for Chemistry 369 rather than 339K. Structure and function of amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids. Chemistry 339K and 369 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Eight semester hours of coursework in organic chemistry.

339L. Biochemistry II. A second-semester biochemistry course designed for chemistry, premedical, predental, and life sciences majors. Biosynthesis of nucleic acids and proteins. Prerequisite: Chemistry 339K.

341. Special Topics in Laboratory Chemistry. Examples of topics are physical measurements techniques; electronics for scientists; advanced synthetic chemistry (organic or inorganic); separation techniques. One lecture hour and six laboratory hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Eight semester hours of coursework in organic chemistry and consent of the undergraduate adviser.

644. Chemical Education: Secondary School. Issues and techniques in secondary school teaching of chemical sciences. Three lecture hours a week for two semesters. For students seeking the Bachelor of Science in Chemistry: Teaching Option degree. May not be counted toward any other degree in chemistry or biochemistry. Prerequisite: For 644A, eight semester hours of coursework in organic chemistry and credit or registration for Chemistry 144K; for 644B, Chemistry 644A, 144K, and credit or registration for Chemistry 144L.

144K. Chemical Education Laboratory I. Development of classroom demonstrations, laboratory experiments, and teaching aids for secondary school teaching of the chemical sciences. Two laboratory hours a week for one semester. For students seeking the Bachelor of Science in Chemistry: Teaching Option degree. May not be counted toward any other degree in chemistry or biochemistry. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Chemistry 644A.

144L. Chemical Education Laboratory II. Development of classroom demonstrations, laboratory experiments, and teaching aids for secondary school teaching of the chemical sciences. Two laboratory hours a week for one semester. For students seeking the Bachelor of Science in Chemistry: Teaching Option degree. May not be counted toward any other degree in chemistry or biochemistry. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Chemistry 644B.

353. Physical Chemistry I. For chemistry and chemical engineering majors. Equations of state, laws of thermodynamics, ideal and nonideal solutions, phase equilibria, thermodynamics of chemical reactions. Chemistry 353 and 353M may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Mathematics 408C and 408D, or two of the following: Mathematics 408K, 408L, 408M; Chemistry 302 or 302H with a grade of at least C; and Physics 316 and 116L, 303 and 103N, or 317L and 117N.

153K. Physical Chemistry Laboratory. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Chemistry 353 or 353M with a grade of at least C.

353M. Physical Chemistry I for Life Sciences. For biochemistry and biology majors. Thermochemistry and kinetics of reactions in cells, enzyme catalysis, electrical and transport properties of membranes. Chemistry 353 and 353M may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Mathematics 408C and 408D, or two of the following: Mathematics 408K, 408L, 408M; Chemistry 302 or 302H with a grade of at least C; and Physics 316 and 116L, 303 and 103N, or 317L and 117N.

354. Quantum Chemistry and Spectroscopy. Fundamental principles of quantum mechanics, exactly soluble model problems, electronic structure of atoms and molecules, spectroscopy. Prerequisite: Mathematics 408C and 408D, or two of the following: Mathematics 408K, 408L, 408M; and Physics 316 and 116L.

154K. Physical Chemistry Laboratory. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Chemistry 353 or 353M with a grade of at least C, and credit or registration for Chemistry 354 or 354L.

354L. Physical Chemistry II. Molecular energy levels, statistical thermodynamics (macroscopic thermodynamic functions from molecular input), and physical and chemical kinetics, with emphasis on the molecular viewpoint. May be counted toward a biochemistry or chemistry degree. Chemistry 354, rather than this course, is recommended for students planning graduate study in chemistry. Prerequisite: Chemistry 353 or 353M with a grade of at least C.

455. Fundamentals of Analytical Chemistry. For biochemistry, engineering, and clinical laboratory science majors. Chemical and instrumental methods in analytical chemistry. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Chemistry 455 and 456 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Chemistry 302 and either 204 or 317, with a grade of at least C in each.

456. Analytical Chemistry. For chemistry majors. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Chemistry 455 and 456 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Chemistry 302 or 302H with a grade of at least C, and Chemistry 204 or 317 with a grade of at least C.

367L. Macromolecular Chemistry. Designed for chemistry and chemical engineering students. Occurrence, preparation, structure, and properties of macromolecular substances. Prerequisite: Chemistry 610A and 610B, 310M and 310N, 618A and 618B, or 318M and 318N; Chemistry 210C, or 118K and 118L; and Chemistry 353 or 353M with a grade of at least C.

368. Advanced Topics in Chemistry. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Chemistry 610A and 610B, 310M and 310N, 618A and 618B, or 318M and 318N; Chemistry 353 or 353M with a grade of at least C; and Chemistry 354 or 354L with a grade of at least C.

369. Fundamentals of Biochemistry. Chemistry 339K and 369 may not both be counted. May not be counted by biochemistry majors. Prerequisite: Chemistry 310M (or 610A) or 318M (or 618A).

369K. Techniques of Research. Advanced laboratory practice and introduction to research. One lecture hour and six laboratory hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit. May be taken for a letter grade no more than twice. No more than six semester hours may be counted toward a degree in chemistry or biochemistry. Prerequisite: Eight semester hours of coursework in organic chemistry; and six semester hours of upper-division chemistry courses approved by the undergraduate adviser's office, or consent of the undergraduate adviser in chemistry.

369L. Biochemistry Laboratory. An introduction to modern fundamental techniques of biochemistry. Two lecture hours and seven laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Chemistry 339K and credit or registration for 339L.

369T. Biotechnology Laboratory. Advanced techniques in biotechnology. Nine laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

370. Physical Methods for Biochemistry. Theory of electrophoresis, ultracentrifugation, spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and diffraction as applied to biological macromolecules. Prerequisite: Chemistry 339K.

371K. Science Outreach in Elementary Schools. Students develop and present level-appropriate science laboratories to students in local elementary schools. Students also plan and create the infrastructure needed to administer the science program in concert with the science curriculum at a specific elementary school. A hands-on, discovery learning approach to science is emphasized. One class hour and six hours of fieldwork a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit. May be taken for a letter grade no more than twice. No more than six semester hours may be counted toward a degree in chemistry or biochemistry. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, at least six hours of upper-division coursework in the College of Natural Sciences, and consent of the UTeach adviser in the College of Natural Sciences.

375K, 475K. Individual Study in Chemistry and Biochemistry. Supervised reading or individual tutorial sessions on advanced topics in chemistry and biochemistry. Three or four class hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit. No more than six semester hours may be counted toward a degree in chemistry or biochemistry. Prerequisite: Eight semester hours of coursework in organic chemistry, Chemistry 353, and consent of the undergraduate adviser.

376K. Advanced Analytical Chemistry. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Chemistry 353 and 456 with a grade of at least C in each.

379H. Chemistry Honors Tutorial Course. Laboratory research project in a specific field of chemistry under the supervision of one or more faculty members. Conference course. May be repeated once for credit. Must be taken in addition to the required hours for the Bachelor of Science in Chemistry degree. Students must enter no later than the first semester of the year of graduation. Prerequisite: Consent of the student's research supervisor and the departmental honors adviser.

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Department of Computer Sciences

An undergraduate may not enroll in any computer sciences course more than once without written consent of an undergraduate adviser in computer sciences. No student may enroll in any computer sciences course more than twice. No student may take more than three upper-division computer sciences courses in a semester without written consent of an undergraduate adviser in computer sciences.

Unless otherwise stated below, each course meets for three lecture hours a week for one semester.

C S | Computer Sciences

The information in parentheses after a course number is the Texas Common Course Numbering (TCCN) designation. Only TCCN designations that are exact semester-hour equivalents of University courses are listed here. Additional TCCN information is given in Appendix A.

Lower-Division Courses

301K. Foundations of Logical Thought. Introductory logic in the context of computing; introduction to formal notations; basic proof techniques; sets, relations, and functions. Some sections also require one discussion hour a week; these are identified in the Course Schedule. Prerequisite: Credit with a grade of at least C or registration for Computer Sciences 303E or 307.

302. Computer Fluency. An introduction to the fundamental concepts of computing: how computers work, what they can do, and how they can be used effectively. Some programming is required. Credit for Computer Sciences 302 may not be earned after a student has received credit for Computer Sciences 303E, 305J, or 307.

303E. Elements of Computers and Programming. Problem solving and fundamental algorithms for various applications in science and business and on the World Wide Web. Introductory programming in a modern object-oriented programming language. Computer Sciences 303E and 305J may not both be counted. Credit for Computer Sciences 303E may not be earned after a student has received credit for Computer Sciences 307. Prerequisite: Credit with a grade of at least C or registration for Mathematics 305G, or equivalent score on the SAT Mathematics Level 1 or Level 2 test.

105. Computer Programming. An introduction to programming in a particular computer language. Students design and implement programs. One lecture hour a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the languages vary. Prerequisite: Computer Sciences 315 or 315H with a grade of at least C.

305J (TCCN: COSC 1337). Introduction to Computing. Introduction to computer science concepts. Programming in a modern object-oriented programming language. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Computer Sciences 303E and 305J may not both be counted. Credit for Computer Sciences 305J may not be earned after a student has received credit for Computer Sciences 307. Prerequisite: Some knowledge of and experience in computer programming; and credit with a grade of at least C or registration for Mathematics 305G, or equivalent score on the SAT Mathematics Level 1 or Level 2 test.

307 (TCCN: COSC 2336). Foundations of Computer Science. Fundamental computer science concepts: data types, data structures, algorithms, and programming; functions and recursion; abstraction and encapsulation. Correctness: specification, testing, and proving. Simple sorting and searching algorithms. Introduction to analysis of algorithms. Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: One of the following: one year of programming in high school, Computer Sciences 303E or 305J with a grade of at least C, or consent of instructor; and credit or registration for Mathematics 408C or 408K, or a score of at least 520 on the SAT Mathematics Level 1 or Level 2 test.

108. Software Systems. Introduction to the use of a particular software system. Students build applications that exploit the system being studied. One lecture hour a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Offered on the pass/fail basis only. Prerequisite: Computer Sciences 315 or 315H with a grade of at least C.

310. Computer Organization and Programming. Basic computer organization; machine representation of instructions and data; hardware/software interface. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Computer Sciences 310 and 310H may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Computer Sciences 315 or 315H with a grade of at least C.

310H. Computer Organization and Programming: Honors. Basic computer organization; machine representation of instructions and data; hardware/software interface. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Computer Sciences 310 and 310H may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Computer Sciences 315 or 315H with a grade of at least C, and consent of the honors director.

313E. Elements of Software Design. Object-oriented design of software in a modern high-level language, using software library packages. Introduction to elementary data structures and complexity of algorithms. May not be counted toward a degree in computer sciences. Prerequisite: Computer Sciences 303E or 305J with a grade of at least C.

313H. Logic, Sets, and Functions: Honors. Propositional and predicate logic; proof techniques, including induction, sets, relations, and functions. Introduction to the analysis of algorithms and techniques for proving properties of programs. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Computer Sciences 313H, 313K, Philosophy 313, 313K, 313Q. Prerequisite: Consent of the honors director.

313K. Logic, Sets, and Functions. Propositional and predicate logic; proof techniques, including induction, sets, relations, and functions. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Computer Sciences 313H, 313K, Philosophy 313, 313K, 313Q. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Mathematics 408C or 408K.

315. Algorithms and Data Structures. Implementation of basic data structures, including stacks, queues, lists, priority queues, trees, binary search trees, graphs, and sets. Recursion. Efficient sorting and searching algorithms. Hashing. Multithreaded programs. Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour a week for one semester. Computer Sciences 315 and 315H may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Computer Sciences 307 with a grade of at least C and credit or registration for Philosophy 313K.

315H. Algorithms and Data Structures: Honors. Data types, data structures, algorithms, and programming; functions and recursion; abstraction and encapsulation. Correctness: specification, testing, proving. Introduction to analysis of algorithms. Implementation and use of basic data structures, including stacks, queues, lists, priority queues, trees, binary search trees, graphs, sets. Efficient sorting and searching algorithms. Hashing. Multithreaded programs. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Computer Sciences 315 and 315H may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Consent of the honors director.

119S, 219S, 319S, 419S, 519S, 619S, 719S, 819S, 919S. Topics in Computer Sciences. This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Center for Global Educational Opportunities. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Computer Sciences. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

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Upper-Division Courses

120N, 220N, 320N. Topics in Computer Sciences for Nonmajors. For each semester hour of credit earned, one lecture hour a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. May not be counted toward a degree in computer sciences. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

321H. Functional and Symbolic Programming: Honors. Introduction to functional and symbolic programming and to the use of these concepts throughout computer science. Prerequisite: Credit with a grade of at least C or registration for Computer Sciences 337 or 337H, and consent of the honors director.

323E. Elements of Scientific Computing. Fundamentals of software issues related to scientific computing. Topics include floating-point computations, numerical computation errors, interpolation, integration, solution of linear systems of equations, optimization, and initial value problems of ordinary differential equations. Implementation of algorithms are investigated using MATLAB for matrix and vector computations. Examples are drawn from a variety of science and mathematics areas. May not be counted toward a degree in computer sciences. Computer Sciences 323E and 323H may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Computer Sciences 303E or the equivalent, Mathematics 408C or 408K, 408D or 408M, and credit with a grade of at least C or registration for Mathematics 341 or 340L.

323H. Elements of Scientific Computing: Honors. Fundamentals of software issues related to scientific computing. Topics include floating-point computations, numerical computation errors, interpolation, integration, solution of linear systems of equations, optimization, and initial value problems of ordinary differential equations. Implementation of algorithms are investigated using MATLAB for matrix and vector computations. Examples are drawn from a variety of science and mathematics areas. May not be counted toward a degree in computer sciences. Computer Sciences 323E and 323H may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Computer Sciences 303E, 305J, or 307; Mathematics 408D or 408M; credit with a grade of at least C or registration for Mathematics 341 or 340L; and consent of the honors director.

324E. Elements of Graphics and Visualization. Basics of two- and three-dimensional computer graphics systems, modeling and rendering, and selected graphics software APIs. Other topics may include interactive graphics, animation, graphical user interfaces, and the graphical presentation of information. May not be counted toward a degree in computer sciences. Prerequisite: Computer Sciences 303E, 313E, and Mathematics 408C or 408L with a grade of at least C in each.

326E. Elements of Networking. Introduction to the principles and basic concepts of the Internet. Networking applications and protocols. Simple client/server applications. Other topics may include network technologies and topologies, packet and circuit switching, LANS and WANS, Internet security, and network management. May not be counted toward a degree in computer sciences. Prerequisite: Computer Sciences 303E and 313E with a grade of at least C in each.

327E. Elements of Databases. A practical introduction to database management systems, with discussion of database administration and management. Survey of logical modeling, database design with a focus on relational databases, SQL query language, and current applications. Topics may include data integrity, performance, concurrency, transaction processing, recovery, security, and Web applications. May not be counted toward a degree in computer sciences. Prerequisite: Computer Sciences 303E and 313E with a grade of at least C in each.

328. Advanced Programming. Analysis and implementation of algorithms and applications. Combinatorial and search algorithms. Correctness proofs of recursive programs. Lower bounds and hardness. Dynamic storage management. Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Computer Sciences 310 or 310H with a grade of at least C, and consent of the undergraduate adviser.

329E. Topics in Elements of Computing. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. May not be counted toward a degree in computer sciences. Prerequisite: Computer Science 303E and 313E with a grade of at least C in each, and consent of instructor.

129S, 229S, 329S, 429S, 529S, 629S, 729S, 829S, 929S. Topics in Computer Sciences. This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Center for Global Educational Opportunities. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Computer Sciences. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

329W. Cooperative Computer Sciences. This course covers the work period of computer sciences students in the Cooperative Education program, which provides supervised work experience by arrangement with the employer and the supervising instructor. Forty laboratory hours a week for one semester. The student must repeat the course each work period and must take it twice to receive credit toward the degree; at least one of these registrations must be during a long-session semester. However, no more than three semester hours may be counted toward the major requirement. The student's first registration must be on the pass/fail basis; the second must be on the letter-grade basis. Prerequisite: Computer Sciences 336 or 336H with a grade of at least C, and consent of the undergraduate adviser.

234. Technical Writing. Application of techniques and strategies of effective technical writing, and of conventions used in documents such as letters, memos, proposals, abstracts, and reports. Two lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Computer Sciences 134, 234, 178 (Topic: Technical Writing). May not be counted toward the number of hours in computer sciences required for the Bachelor of Science in Computer Sciences degree. Prerequisite: Computer Sciences 310 or 310H with a grade of at least C.

336. Analysis of Programs. Proofs of program correctness and a survey of mathematical techniques useful in the analysis and verification of programs. Computer Sciences 336 and 336H may not both be counted. Prerequisite: The following courses, with a grade of at least C in each: Computer Sciences 315 or 315H, Mathematics 408C or 408L, and Philosophy 313K or Computer Sciences 313H.

336H. Analysis of Programs: Honors. A survey of mathematical techniques useful in the analysis and verification of programs. Computer Sciences 336 and 336H may not both be counted. Prerequisite: The following courses, with a grade of at least C in each: Computer Sciences 315 or 315H, Philosophy 313K or Computer Sciences 313H, and Mathematics 408C or 408L; and consent of the honors director.

337. Theory in Programming Practice. Application of program-analysis theory to program design. Methodologies for large-scale program design. Designed to help students bring together theoretical and programming skills. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Computer Sciences 337 and 337H may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Computer Sciences 315 or 315H with a grade of at least C; Computer Sciences 336 or 336H with a grade of at least C, or consent of the honors director; and Mathematics 408C or 408L with a grade of at least C.

337H. Theory in Programming Practice: Honors. Application of program-analysis theory to program design. Methodologies for large-scale program design. Designed to help students bring together theoretical and programming skills. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Computer Sciences 337 and 337H may not both be counted. Prerequisite: The following courses, with a grade of at least C in each: Computer Sciences 315 or 315H, 336 or 336H, and Mathematics 408C or 408L; and consent of the honors director.

341. Automata Theory. Introduction to the formal study of automata and of related formal languages with applications in computer science. Only one of the following may be counted: Computer Sciences 341, 341H, Linguistics 340. Prerequisite: The following courses, with a grade of at least C in each: Computer Sciences 310 or 310H, 336 or 336H, 328 or 337 or 337H, and Mathematics 408D or 408M.

341H. Automata Theory: Honors. Introduction to the formal study of automata and of related formal languages with applications in computer science. Only one of the following may be counted: Computer Sciences 341, 341H, Linguistics 340. Prerequisite: The following courses, with a grade of at least C in each: Computer Sciences 310 or 310H, 336 or 336H, 337 or 337H, and Mathematics 408D or 408M; and consent of the honors director.

342. Neural Networks. Biological information processing; architectures and algorithms for supervised learning, self-organization, reinforcement learning, and neuro-evolution; hardware implementations and simulators; applications in engineering, artificial intelligence, and cognitive science. Prerequisite: The following courses, with a grade of at least C in each: Computer Sciences 310 or 310H, 336 or 336H, and Mathematics 408D or 408M.

343. Artificial Intelligence. A survey of current artificial intelligence issues, including search, production systems, knowledge representation, knowledge-based systems, planning, natural language processing, and machine learning. Artificial intelligence programming projects are required. Prerequisite: The following courses, with a grade of at least C in each: Computer Sciences 310 or 310H, 336 or 336H, and Mathematics 408D or 408M.

344M. Autonomous Multiagent Systems. Introduction to autonomous agents, with an emphasis on multiagent systems. Students use a robotics simulator. Emphasis on computer science research activities, including speaking, writing, programming, and working in groups. Computer Sciences 344M and 378 (Topic: Autonomous Multiagent Systems) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: The following courses, with a grade of at least C in each: Computer Sciences 310 or 310H, 336 or 336H, and Mathematics 408D or 408M.

344R. Robotics. A survey of methods and techniques important for intelligent robotics. Students work in teams, applying these methods to get intelligent behavior from physical robots. Computer Sciences 344R and 378 (Topic: Robotics) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: The following courses, with a grade of at least C in each: Computer Sciences 310 or 310H, 336 or 336H, and Mathematics 408D or 408M.

345. Programming Languages. Survey of significant concepts underlying modern programming languages, including syntax, functions, expressions, types, polymorphism, assignment, procedures, pointers, encapsulation, classes, and inheritance, with some discussion of implementation issues. Prominent programming paradigms, such as sequential, concurrent, object-oriented, functional, and logic programming. Illustrative examples drawn from a variety of current languages. Computer Sciences 345 and 345H may not both be counted. Prerequisite: The following courses, with a grade of at least C in each: Computer Sciences 310 or 310H, 336 or 336H, and Mathematics 408D or 408M.

345H. Programming Languages: Honors. Survey of significant concepts underlying modern programming languages, including syntax, functions, expressions, types, polymorphism, assignment, procedures, pointers, encapsulation, classes, and inheritance, with some discussion of implementation issues. Prominent programming paradigms, such as sequential, concurrent, object-oriented, functional, and logic programming. Illustrative examples drawn from a variety of current languages. Computer Sciences 345 and 345H may not both be counted. Prerequisite: The following courses, with a grade of at least C in each: Computer Sciences 310 or 310H, 336 or 336H, and Mathematics 408D or 408M; and consent of the honors director.

346. Cryptography. A theoretical introduction to cryptography. Topics include private key cryptosystems, public key cryptosystems, digital signatures, secret sharing schemes, and the necessary mathematical background. Computer Sciences 346 and 378 (Topic: Cryptography) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: The following courses, with a grade of at least C in each: Computer Sciences 310 or 310H, 336 or 336H, and Mathematics 408D or 408M.

347. Data Management. Concepts of database design and database system implementation. Data models, query processing, database design theory, crash recovery, concurrent control, and distributed databases. Prerequisite: The following courses, with a grade of at least C in each: Computer Sciences 310 or 310H, 336 or 336H, and Mathematics 408D or 408M.

349. Contemporary Issues in Computer Science. Social, professional, and ethical issues involved in the use of computer technology. Topics may include software engineering ethics, computer safety and reliability, constitutional issues, intellectual property, computer crime, societal impact, emerging technologies, philosophical issues. Computer Sciences 349 and 378 (Topic: Contemporary Issues in Computer Science) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Computer Sciences 315 or 315H with a grade of at least C.

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351. LISP and Symbolic Computation. Symbolic computation for artificial intelligence, such as pattern-matching, unification, frames, flavors, semantic networks, deductive retrieval, rule-based and constraint-based inference. Substantial programming projects in LISP. Prerequisite: The following courses, with a grade of at least C in each: Computer Sciences 310 or 310H, 336 or 336H, and Mathematics 408D or 408M.

352. Computer Systems Architecture. Computer architecture and organizational issues; structural and behavioral characteristics of system components. Processor, memory hierarchy, and input/output issues. Evaluation of design alternatives. The relationship between hardware and software. Computer Sciences 352 and 352H may not both be counted. Prerequisite: The following courses, with a grade of at least C in each: Computer Sciences 310 or 310H, 336 or 336H, Electrical Engineering 316, and Mathematics 408D or 408M.

352H. Computer Systems Architecture: Honors. Computer architecture and organizational issues; structural and behavioral characteristics of system components. Processor, memory hierarchy, and input/output issues. Evaluation of design alternatives. The relationship between hardware and software. Computer Sciences 352 and 352H may not both be counted. Prerequisite: The following courses, with a grade of at least C in each: Computer Sciences 310 or 310H, 336 or 336H, Electrical Engineering 316, and Mathematics 408D or 408M; and consent of the honors director.

353. Theory of Computation. A survey of the theoretical bases of computation: computational complexity (including the classes P and NP) and formal models of the semantics of programming languages. Prerequisite: Computer Sciences 341 or 341H with a grade of at least C.

354. Computer Graphics. Introduction to techniques for human-machine communication through imagery. Topics include display hardware, transformations, interactive techniques, geometric modeling, two- and three-dimensional display algorithms, graphics software systems architecture, and hidden-line and surface elimination. Projects are assigned and in-depth exploration is encouraged. Prerequisite: The following courses, with a grade of at least C in each: Computer Sciences 310 or 310H, 336 or 336H, Mathematics 408D or 408M, and Mathematics 341 or 340L.

356. Computer Networks. Introduction to computer networks, including common terminology, basic design issues, and types of networks and protocols. Prerequisite: The following courses, with a grade of at least C in each: Computer Sciences 310 or 310H, 336 or 336H, and Mathematics 408D or 408M; and credit with a grade of at least C or registration for Computer Sciences 352 or 352H.

357. Algorithms. Algorithmic paradigms: divide and conquer, greedy algorithms, dynamic programming, branch and bound. NP-completeness and topics selected from the following: cryptography algorithms, approximation algorithms, randomized algorithms, parallel algorithms, lower bounds. Prerequisite: The following courses, with a grade of at least C in each: Computer Sciences 310 or 310H, 336 or 336H, 328 or 337 or 337H, and Mathematics 408D or 408M.

361. Introduction to Computer Security. Computer security, both in the abstract and in the context of real systems, including recognizing potential threats to confidentiality, integrity and availability, and developing familiarity with current security-related issues in computer science. Computer Sciences 361 and 378 (Topic: Introduction to Security) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: The following courses, with a grade of at least C in each: Computer Sciences 310 or 310H, 336 or 336H, and Mathematics 408D or 408M.

367. Numerical Methods. Topics include systems of linear equations, numerical integration, ordinary differential equations, and nonlinear equations. Construction and use of large numerical systems. Influence of data representation and computer architecture on algorithm choice and development. Only one of the following may be counted: Computer Sciences 367, Mathematics 368K, Physics 329. Prerequisite: The following courses, with a grade of at least C in each: Computer Sciences 310 or 310H, 336 or 336H, Mathematics 408D or 408M, and Mathematics 341 or 340L.

369. Systems Modeling I. Introduction to performance modeling, with emphasis on computer systems. Modeling methodology, queueing network models, simulation, analysis of results. Prerequisite: The following courses, with a grade of at least C in each: Computer Sciences 310 or 310H, 336 or 336H, and Mathematics 362K.

370. Undergraduate Reading and Research. Supervised study of selected problems in computer sciences, by individual arrangement with supervising instructor. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. No more than three semester hours may be counted toward a degree in computer sciences. Prerequisite: The following courses, with a grade of at least C in each: Computer Sciences 310 or 310H, 336 or 336H, and Mathematics 408D or 408M; and consent of the undergraduate adviser.

371D. Distributed Computing. Models, principles, and fundamental protocols, including event ordering and global predicate detection, atomic commit, state-machine replication, rollback recovery, primary backup, consensus for synchronous and asynchronous systems, and byzantine fault-tolerance. Prerequisite: The following courses, with a grade of at least C in each: Computer Sciences 310 or 310H, 336 or 336H, 372 or 372H, and Mathematics 408D or 408M.

371P. Object-Oriented Programming. Programming using class derivation, inheritance, and dynamic polymorphism. Application of a simple object-oriented design methodology to several software development problems. Prerequisite: The following courses, with a grade of at least C in each: Computer Sciences 310 or 310H, 336 or 336H, 328 or 337 or 337H, and Mathematics 408D or 408M.

371R. Information Retrieval and Web Search. Introduction to traditional and recent methodologies for indexing, processing, querying, and classifying unstructured and semistructured textual data, including hypertext and World-Wide Web documents. Computer Sciences 371R and 378 (Topic: Intelligent Information Retrieval and Web Search) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: The following courses, with a grade of at least C in each: Computer Sciences 310 or 310H, 336 or 336H, and Mathematics 408D or 408M.

371S. Object-Oriented Software Engineering. Object-oriented formulations of software systems as executable specifications, object-oriented analysis, design of software architectures, translation of high-level specification systems. Prerequisite: The following courses, with a grade of at least C in each: Computer Sciences 310 or 310H, 336 or 336H, and Mathematics 408D or 408M.

372. Introduction to Operating Systems. Basic concepts of operating systems: concurrent process management, virtual memory, file systems, scheduling, and protection. Computer Sciences 372 and 372H may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Computer Sciences 328, 337, or 337H with a grade of at least C, and Computer Sciences 352 or 352H with a grade of at least C.

372H. Introduction to Operating Systems: Honors. Basic concepts of operating systems: concurrent process management, virtual memory, file systems, scheduling, and protection. Computer Sciences 372 and 372H may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Computer Sciences 328, 337, or 337H with a grade of at least C, Computer Sciences 352 or 352H with a grade of at least C, and consent of the honors director.

373. Software Engineering. Introduction to current knowledge, techniques, and theories in large software system design and development. Prerequisite: The following courses, with a grade of at least C in each: Computer Sciences 310 or 310H, 336 or 336H, and Mathematics 408D or 408M.

375. Compilers. Formal description of languages, lexical analysis, syntax analysis, syntax-directed translation, run-time system management, code generation, code optimization, compiler-building tools. Prerequisite: The following courses, with a grade of at least C in each: Computer Sciences 310 or 310H, 336 or 336H, and Mathematics 408D or 408M. Computer Sciences 341 or 341H and 345 or 345H are recommended.

377. Principles and Applications of Parallel Programming. Models of parallel computation, fundamental concepts for representation of parallel computation structures, study of representative parallel programming systems, programming of parallel algorithms and computations. Prerequisite: Computer Sciences 345 or 345H with a grade of at least C.

178, 378. Undergraduate Topics in Computer Sciences. One or three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Only one of the following may be counted unless the topics vary: Computer Sciences 178, 378, 178H, 378H. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing. Additional prerequisites vary with the topic and are given in the Course Schedule.

178H, 378H. Undergraduate Topics in Computer Sciences: Honors. One or three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Only one of the following may be counted unless the topics vary: Computer Sciences 178, 378, 178H, 378H. Prerequisite: The following courses, with a grade of at least C in each: Computer Sciences 310 or 310H, 336 or 336H, and Mathematics 408D; and consent of the honors director.

379H. Computer Sciences Honors Thesis. Directed reading, research, and/or projects in areas of computer sciences, under supervision of a faculty member, leading to an honors thesis. The thesis must be approved by a committee of three readers. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester, by arrangement with a faculty member. Prerequisite: The following courses, with a grade of at least C in each: Computer Sciences 310 or 310H, 336 or 336H, and Mathematics 408D or 408M; nine additional semester hours of upper-division coursework in computer sciences, with a grade of at least C in each course; and consent of the student's research supervisor and the departmental honors adviser.

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Undergraduate Catalog | 2006-2008
College of Natural Sciences
page 11 of 15 in Chapter 11
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College of Natural Sciences Office of the Registrar University of Texas at Austin copyright 2006
Official Publications 15 Aug 2006