UT AUSTIN
cover photo

UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG
1998 - 2000


CONTENTS

CHAPTER 1
The University

CHAPTER 2
School of Architecture

CHAPTER 3
College of Business Administration

CHAPTER 4
College of Communication

CHAPTER 5
College of Education

CHAPTER 6
College of Engineering

CHAPTER 7
College of Fine Arts

CHAPTER 8
College of Liberal Arts

CHAPTER 9
College of Natural Sciences

CHAPTER 10
School of Nursing

CHAPTER 11
College of Pharmacy

CHAPTER 12
School of Social Work

CHAPTER 13
The Faculty

Texas Common Course Numbering System
(Appendix A)

APPENDIX B
Degree and Course Abbreviations

  CHAPTER FIVE CONTENTS
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 Chapter 5
 Education
  continued


Elementary Academic Specializations

Art

Twenty-four semester hours, consisting of

  1. Studio Art 302K, 302L, 320K (Topic: Basic Drawing Skills for Nonart Majors), and either another topic of 320K or 320L.
  2. Either Visual Art Studies 221C and 121D or 241C and 141D; and Visual Art Studies 261C and 161D.
  3. Art History 302 and 303.

Biology

Twenty to twenty-two semester hours, consisting of

  1. Biology 302, 303, and 304.
  2. At least two semester hours chosen from Biology 205, 206, 208, Botany 308, 419, Marine Science 307, Microbiology 226 and 129K, Zoology 314K, 316K, and 317.
  3. Science 360 (Topic 1: Life Science).
  4. Six semester hours of upper-division coursework chosen from cellular and molecular biology, genetics and evolution, systematics and environmental biology, and physiological and developmental biology.

Earth Science

Eighteen or nineteen semester hours, consisting of

  1. At least nine semester hours chosen from Geological Sciences 401, 302D, 302E, 302K, 303, 404C or 405, 307, and 416M.
  2. Geological Sciences 360K or Science 360 (Topic 2: Earth Science).
  3. Six semester hours of upper-division coursework chosen from Astronomy 367M or Physical Science 367M, Geological Sciences 320L, 335, 360L, 367K, and other courses approved by a teacher certification adviser.

English

Twenty-one semester hours, consisting of

  1. English 306, 316K, and three additional semester hours of lower-division English.
  2. Three semester hours of upper-division English, in either a single- or dual-author course or a lit erary period or survey course.
  3. Three semester hours of upper-division English, in either a literary genre or theme course or a comparative or interdisciplinary course.
  4. Three semester hours of upper-division English, in either a language or a writing course.
  5. Three additional semester hours in English.

French

Twenty-five semester hours, consisting of

  1. French 506, 507, 312K, and 312L or 312M or 312N; or the equivalent lower-division courses.
  2. French 320E; and French 340C, 340P, or 340T.
  3. Three additional semester hours of upper-division French.

Geography

Twenty-one semester hours, consisting of

  1. Geography 301C or 301K, 305, 308 or 312, 320K or 325, and 324 or 337.
  2. Six semester hours, three of which must be upper-division, in non-United States regional geography.

German

Twenty-five semester hours, consisting of

  1. German 506, 507 or 508K, 312K, 312L or 310, 328, and 356.
  2. Three additional semester hours of upper-division coursework in German literature or culture.

History

Twenty-one semester hours, consisting of

  1. History 309K, 309L, 315K, and 315L.
  2. Three semester hours of upper-division coursework in United States history.
  3. Three semester hours chosen from History 320L, 320P, and 320R.
  4. Three semester hours of upper-division coursework in non-European, non-United States history.

Kinesiology

Nineteen semester hours, consisting of

  1. Kinesiology 119 (Topic: Conditioning: Basic Core Course) and one semester hour chosen from kine-siology core topics in ballroom dance, basketball, gymnastics, swimming, tennis, and volleyball.
  2. Three semester hours chosen from Kinesiology 119 basic skills topics.
  3. Two semester hours chosen from Kinesiology 219D, 219S, and 219T.
  4. Kinesiology 310, 321M, 324K or 335, and 375.

Proficiency is required in three of the following areas of human movement: ballroom dance, basketball, gymnastics, swimming, tennis, and volleyball. One of these areas is covered by the required Kinesiology 119 core course, but students must demonstrate proficiency in two additional areas. Proficiency in each area may be demonstrated by passing skill tests and written tests or by earning a collegiate letter; information about skill and written tests is available from the Department of Kinesiology and Health Education. Students unable to demonstrate such proficiency must complete a basic core topic of Kinesiology 119 in each area of deficiency.

Life/Earth Science

Twenty-four or twenty-five semester hours, consisting of

  1. Twelve or thirteen semester hours of biological sciences and earth science, including at least nine hours in one of these areas and at least three hours in the other, chosen from Astronomy 367M or Physical Science 367M, Biology 302, 303, 304, Botany 308, 419, Geological Sciences 401, 302D, 302K, 303, 405, 307, 335, Marine Science 307, Microbiology 226 and 129K, Zoology 314K, 316K, and 317.
  2. Science 360 (Topic 1: Life Science) and either Geological Sciences 360K or Science 360 (Topic 2: Earth Science).
  3. Six additional semester hours of biological science or earth science, three of which must be upper-division.

Mathematics

Twenty-three semester hours, consisting of

  1. Mathematics 305G, 408C, 408D, and 333L.
  2. Nine semester hours chosen from Mathematics 311, 325K, 328K, 360M, and appropriate topics of Mathematics 175, 275, 375, 475.

Music

Eighteen semester hours, consisting of

  1. Music 302L, 606A (The Elements of Music--Education Majors), 313 (Fundamentals of Music--Classroom Instruments), and 354.
  2. Six semester hours chosen from Music 334, 338, 342, and 343J.

Physical Science

Twenty-four semester hours, consisting of

  1. Physical Science 303 and 304.
  2. Nine semester hours, including six in one science, chosen from Astronomy 301, 302, 307, 309, 309N, 309R, 309T, Astronomy 367M or Physical Science 367M, Chemistry 301, 302, 204, 304K, 305, 313N, 113P, Physics 302K and 102M, and 302L and 102N.
  3. Science 360 (Topic 3: Physical Science).
  4. Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in chemistry, physical science, or physics.

Russian

Twenty-five semester hours, consisting of Russian 506, 507, 312K, 312L, 320K, 324, and 330.

Spanish

Twenty-five semester hours, consisting of

  1. Spanish 506, either 507 or 508K, and either 312K and 312L or 612.
  2. Spanish 328 and either 326K or 326L; or Spanish 322K and three semester hours chosen from Spanish 325K, 325L, and 341K.
  3. Spanish 327.

Special Education

Twenty-four semester hours, consisting of

  1. Applied Learning and Development 322 and 326.
  2. Special Education 366, 372, 675, 376, and 377.

Speech

Twenty-one semester hours, consisting of

  1. Speech 305, 310K, 313, and 315M.
  2. Six semester hours chosen from Speech 334K, 342K, 350K, 352, 355K, 358, 362K, 365K, and 370L.
  3. Speech 332 or 332K.

Theatre Arts

Eighteen semester hours, consisting of

  1. Theatre and Dance 301, 303, 326, 326C, and 326D.
  2. Three semester hours chosen from Theatre and Dance 317C, 317D, topics of 356T, and other theatre and dance courses approved by the drama education adviser.

Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology

The field of kinesiology consists of biomechanical, physiological, psychological, and sociocultural approaches to the study of movement. The degree program in kinesiology offers two majors: kinesiology teacher certification and kinesiology noncertification. The kinesiology certification major is designed for students interested in studying human movement as a background for teacher certification in physical education. Students who have completed this program may be entitled to teach in grades six through twelve; those who add the all-level option may be entitled to teach in grades one through twelve.

Students who major in kinesiology noncertification choose either the general program or the health promotion and fitness option. The general program is appropriate preparation for further study in sport and exercise sciences or in movement-related areas such as physical therapy. The health promotion and fitness option is designed to prepare graduates for a number of nonschool professions involving wellness, fitness, rehabilitation, and disease prevention.

A total of at least 130 semester hours of credit, forty-two of which must be upper-division, is required for the degree. The curriculum for the degree has three components: the basic education requirements, fifty-eight semester hours of coursework in arts and sciences; a major course of study, with the number of specified hours varying with the major chosen; and electives.

Basic Education Requirements

The basic education requirements below apply to both majors leading to the Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology degree. However, the kinesiology teacher certificationmajor calls for specific courses to meet some of the basic education requirements; these modifications are given under the heading for the major below.

Area A: English, Writing, Foreign Language

  1. English: English 306 and 316K.

  2. Writing: In addition to the specified English courses, the student must complete six semester hours in courses certified as having a substantial writing component. These courses are identified in theCourse Schedule. At least three of these six semester hours, either in English or in another subject, must be at the upper-division level.

  3. Foreign language: All beginning students entering the College of Education must have completed two years in a single foreign language in high school. In addition, students must demonstrate proficiency in a single foreign language equivalent to that shown by completion of the second college semester in the language; proficiency is usually shown by earning credit for language courses 506 and 507 or the equivalent. Students who enter the University with fewer than two high school units in a single foreign language must take the two college semesters in a language without degree credit to remove their language deficiency. Prospective Texas teachers are strongly encouraged to take Spanish to fulfill the language requirement.

    Although the foreign language requirement is the attainment of a certain proficiency rather than the completion of a specified number of hours, the courses taken to gain this proficiency are not electives and may not be taken on the pass/fail basis. Any part of the requirement may be fulfilled by credit by examination.

    To achieve proficiency as rapidly as possible, qualified students are urged to take the intensive foreign language study program. Information about this program is available from the appropriate language department. Courses used to fulfill the foreignlanguage requirement must be language courses; literature-in-translation courses, for example, may not be counted.

    College of Education students may substitute nine semester hours in specific multicultural courses for the foreign language requirement. This program is open only to students who have completed two years of a single foreign language in high school. Acceptable substitute courses are

    1. Applied Learning and Development 327.

    2. Three semester hours chosen from Applied Learning and Development 323, 324, 325, Anthropology 307, 325M, Curriculum and Instruction 371 (Topic 13: Applied Linguistics and Methods in English as a Second Language), and Linguistics 306.

    3. Three semester hours chosen from African and African American Studies 301, Anthropology 302, Mexican American Studies 310, 318, Sociology 309, 344, 347K, and other multicultural courses approved in the student dean's office, George I. Sánchez Building 216.

    Applied Learning and Development 324 and 325 may not be counted toward both the foreign language substitution and the prescribed work in applied learning and development.

Area B: Social Sciences

  1. History 315K and 315L, or six semester hours in other United States history courses that fulfill the legislative requirement described in chapter 1.
  2. Government 310L and 312L.
  3. Psychology 301.
  4. Three semester hours in anthropology, economics, geography, linguistics, or sociology.

Area C: Mathematics and Natural Sciences

  1. Three semester hours of mathematics. Kinesiology teacher certification majors and kinesiology noncertification majors who follow the general program must complete either Mathematics 305G or coursework in calculus. Kinesiology non-certification majors who follow the health promotion and fitness option may choose any mathematics course, excluding Mathematics 301.
  2. Biology 302 and Zoology 316K or 365L.
  3. Six semester hours of chemistry.
  4. Three additional semester hours chosen from astronomy, biological sciences, chemistry, computer applications, computer sciences, geological sciences, mathematics, physical science, physics, experimental psychology, physical anthropology, physical geography, and history of science and philosophy of science.

No more than nine semester hours in one field may be counted toward fulfillment of the mathematics and natural sciences requirement. Kinesiology teacher certification majors must take at least one laboratory course as part of the science requirement.

Area D: General Culture

  1. Three semester hours in architecture, art (including art history, design, studio art, visual art studies), classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), drama, fine arts, music (including music, instruments, ensemble), philosophy (excluding courses in logic), or theatre and dance.
  2. Three semester hours in speech, emphasizing oral language proficiency.

Major Requirements

Kinesiology Teacher Certification

For the major in kinesiology with teacher certification, students must complete

  1. The basic education requirements given above for the Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology, with the following modifications:

    1. Three semester hours of English in addition to English 306 and 316K.

    2. Documented evidence of proficiency in oral communication. This proficiency is assessed in Curriculum and Instruction 332S. Students who lack proficiency must take three semester hours chosen from Speech 305, 319, Theatre and Dance 303, 303C, 326, 326C, and 326D.

    3. Documented evidence of proficiency in computing or three semester hours in computer sciences, management information systems, or courses in computer literacy.

    4. Six semester hours in human development, consisting of

      1. One of the following courses: Child Development 313, Educational Psychology 332 or 363M (Topic 3: Adolescent Development), Psychology 304 or 309.

      2. Applied Learning and Development 322 or Psychology 345.

  2. Prescribed work in the area of specialization

    1. Major: Thirty-two to thirty-seven semester hours, consisting of

      1. Two semester hours of coursework chosen from core topics of Kinesiology 119.

      2. Kinesiology 219D, 219S, 219T, 321M, 324K, 325K, 326K, 335, 360, and 376.

      3. Three hours in psychosocial development chosen from Kinesiology 330, 333, 352K (Topic: Psychological Aspects of Exercise), 352K (Topic: Physical Aging in America), 352K (Topic: Sociological Aspects of Sport and Physical Activity), 352K (Topic 3: Women and Sport), 366, 370K (Topic: Social and Cultural Foundations of Health).

      Proficiency is required in seven areas of human movement: ballroom dance, basketball, conditioning, gymnastics, swimming, tennis, and volleyball. Two of these areas are covered by the required Kinesiology 119 core courses, but students must demonstrate proficiency in all five additional areas. Proficiency in each area may be demonstrated by passing skill tests and written tests or by earning a collegiate letter; information about the skill and written tests is available from the Department of Kinesiology and Health Education. Students unable to demonstrate such proficiency must complete a basic core topic of Kinesiology 119 in each area of deficiency.

    2. Minor: Eighteen semester hours of professional development coursework, consisting of Curriculum and Instruction 331C, 332S, 364 or 371, 667S, and 370S. Students seeking secondary school certification must take Curriculum and Instruction 371 (Topic 18: Critical Issues in Schooling); those seeking all-level certification must take Curriculum and Instruction 364 (Internship).

      Admission to the professional development sequence is restricted to those who have met the requirements given in this chapter.

  3. A second teaching field or the all-level option

    1. Students seeking secondary school certification must complete the requirements of one of the second teaching fields listed in this chapter.

    2. Students seeking all-level certification must complete the following courses: Kinesiology 119 (Topic: Creative Rhythms), 119 (Topic: Developmental Gymnastics), 119 (Topic: Manipulative Skills), and 375.

Kinesiology Noncertification

General Program

For the kinesiology noncertification general program, students must complete

  1. The basic education requirements given above for the Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology.
  2. Prescribed work in the area of specialization
    1. Major: Thirty-two semester hours, consisting of
      1. Two semester hours of coursework chosen from Kinesiology 119 core courses.
      2. Kinesiology 321L or 321M, 324K, 325K, 326K, and 335.
      3. Three semester hours of coursework in psychosocial foundations chosen from Kinesiology 330, 333, 352K (Topic: Psychological Aspects of Exercise), 352K (Topic: Physical Aging in America), 352K (Topic: Sociological Aspects of Sport and Physical Activity), 352K (Topic 3: Women and Sport), 366, 370K (Topic: Social and Cultural Foundations of Health).
      4. Twelve additional semester hours in kinesiology, six of which must be upper-division. No more than six semester hours may be selected from Kinesiology 127L, 227L, 327L, and 627L.
    2. Minor: Eighteen semester hours, nine of which are upper-division, in one subject outside the major approved by the undergraduate adviser. No more than six semester hours may be counted both toward the minor and toward the basic education requirements.

Health Promotion and Fitness

For the health promotion and fitness option, students must complete

  1. The basic education requirements given above for the Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology. The student must also provide evidence of proficiency in computing. He or she may demonstrate this proficiency by completing three hours of coursework in computer sciences, management information systems, or computer literacy as part of the work taken to fulfill the Area C requirement.
  2. Prescribed work in the area of specialization
    1. Major: Forty-two semester hours, consisting of
      1. Kinesiology 324K, 325K, 352K (Topic 4: Management of Sport and Health Promotion Programs), 352K (Topic: Diagnosis and Evaluation of Fitness), 373, and 377.
      2. Nine semester hours of coursework in kinesiology approved by the undergraduate adviser. Kinesiology 119, 127L, 227L, 327L, and 627L may not be used to fulfill this requirement.
      3. A sequence of professional development courses within the major, consisting of Kinesiology 352K (Topic: Techniques of Fitness Leadership), taken concurrently with 127L (Fieldwork: Aiding in Fitness Leadership); 352K (Topic: Techniques of Health Promotion); 627L; and either 227L (Fieldwork: Aiding in Exercise Leadership) or 227L (Fieldwork: Aiding in Exercise Testing). To enroll in the major professional development sequence, the student must have a grade point average in kinesiology of at least 2.50.
    2. Minor: Nutrition 311 and twelve additional semester hours, six of which must be upper-division, in biology and zoology, business, communication, nutrition, psychology, sociology, or another approved subject. No more than three semester hours may be counted both toward the minor and toward the basic education requirements.

Electives

Additional semester hours of coursework to bring the total to 130 semester hours. Kinesiology teacher certification majors may use some of the additional courses required for certification as electives. No more than twelve semester hours in Kinesiology 127L, 227L, 327L, and 627L may be counted toward the degree.



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Undergraduate catalog

Contents  |  Chapter 1  |  Chapter 2  |  Chapter 3  |  Chapter 4
Chapter 5  |  Chapter 6  |  Chapter 7  |  Chapter 8  |  Chapter 9
Chapter 10  |  Chapter 11  |  Chapter 12  |  Chapter 13
Texas Common Course Numbering System (Appendix A)
Appendix B


Related information

Catalogs  |  Course Schedules  |  Academic Calendars
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Office of the Registrar
University of Texas at Austin

11 September 1998. Registrar's Web Team
Comments to rgcat@utxdp.dp.utexas.edu