UT AUSTIN
cover photo

UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG
1998 - 2000


CONTENTS

CHAPTER 1
The University

CHAPTER 2
School of Architecture

CHAPTER 3
College of Business Administration

CHAPTER 4
College of Communication

CHAPTER 5
College of Education

CHAPTER 6
College of Engineering

CHAPTER 7
College of Fine Arts

CHAPTER 8
College of Liberal Arts

CHAPTER 9
College of Natural Sciences

CHAPTER 10
School of Nursing

CHAPTER 11
College of Pharmacy

CHAPTER 12
School of Social Work

CHAPTER 13
The Faculty

Texas Common Course Numbering System
(Appendix A)

APPENDIX B
Degree and Course Abbreviations

  CHAPTER SIX CONTENTS
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 Chapter 6
 Engineering
  continued


Courses

The faculty has approval to offer the following courses in the academic years 1998-1999 and 1999-2000; however, not all courses are taught each semester or summer session. Students should consult the Course Schedule to determine which courses and topics will be offered during a particular semester or summer session. The Course Schedule may also reflect changes that have been made to the courses listed here since this catalog was printed.

A full explanation of course numbers is given in General Information. In brief, the first digit of a course number indicates the semester hour value of the course. The second and third digits indicate the rank of the course: if they are 01 through 19, the course is of lower-division rank; if 20 through 79, of upper-division rank; if 80 through 99, of graduate rank.

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Unless otherwise stated in the description below, each class meets for three lecture hours a week for one semester.

Mechanical Engineering: M E

Lower-Division Courses

302. Introduction to Engineering Design and Graphics.
Introduction to mechanical engineering education and practice through lectures and laboratory experiences. Graphics and modeling fundamentals for engineering design: freehand sketching, computer modeling of solid geometry, and generation of engineering drawings. Introduction to reverse engineering, computer-aided design, rapid prototyping, and manufacturing. Application of the design process and problem solving through individual and team projects. Two lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Mechanical Engineering 302 (or 202), 208 (or 208G), 210 (or 201G), 210H (or 201H).

103. Studies in Engineering Design Graphics.
Computer laboratory work in engineering design graphics for students with transfer credit for Mechanical Engineering 210 (or 201G) who need additional work. Three computer laboratory hours a week for one semester. Mechanical Engineering 102G and 103 may not both be counted. May not be counted by students with credit for Mechanical Engineering 302 (or 202), 208 (or 208G), 210 (or 201G), or 210H (or 201H). Prerequisite: Consent of the undergraduate adviser.

204. Professional Responsibility in Engineering.
Professional ethics, social and environmental responsibilities of engineers. Role of communication, considerations of risk, safety, and liability in engineering design and practice. Two lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for English 306 and admission to the College of Engineering.

208. Graphical and Computer-Aided Interior Design.
Freehand, instrument, and CADD drawing; shape and size description; pictorial methods; and working drawings. Two lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Mechanical Engineering 302 (or 202), 208 (or 208G), 210 (or 201G), 210H (or 201H). Prerequisite: A major in interior design.

210. Engineering Design Graphics.
Graphics and modeling fundamentals for engineering design: freehand sketching, computer modeling of solid geometry, and generation of engineering drawings. Introduction to reverse engineering, computer-aided design, rapid prototyping, and manufacturing. Application of the design process to problem solving. Individual and team design projects. One lecture hour and four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Mechanical Engineering 302 (or 202), 208 (or 208G), 210 (or 201G), 210H (or 201H). May not be counted toward the Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering degree. Prerequisite: A satisfactory score on the College Board Achievement Test in Mathematics Level I, or Mathematics 304E or 305G with a grade of at least C.

210H. Engineering Design Graphics: Honors.
Graphics and modeling fundamentals for engineering design: freehand sketching, computer modeling of solid geometry, and generation of engineering drawings. Introduction to reverse engineering, computer-aided design, rapid prototyping, and manufacturing. Application of the design process to problem solving. Individual and team design projects. One lecture hour and four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Mechanical Engineering 302 (or 202), 208 (or 208G), 210 (or 201G), 210H (or 201H). May not be counted toward the Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering degree. Prerequisite: A satisfactory score on the College Board Achievement Test in Mathematics Level I, or Mathematics 304E or 305G with a grade of at least C; and admission to an engineering honors program.

318. Engineering Computational Methods.
Numerical analysis; programming and numerical computation using mathematical software with applications to mechanical engineering problems. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Mechanical Engineering 218, 318, 319. Prerequisite: Mathematics 427K with a grade of at least C and admission to an appropriate major sequence in engineering.

Upper-Division Courses

320. Applied Thermodynamics.
First and second laws of thermodynamics; thermodynamic processes, cycles, and heat transfer. May not be counted toward the Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering degree. Prerequisite: Chemistry 301, Mathematics 408D, and Physics 303K.

321G. Computer-Aided Drafting and Design.
Introduction to interactive computer graphics hardware and techniques, and to their application to computer-aided drafting and design. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. May not be counted toward the Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering degree. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, an architectural or engineering drafting course, and a basic design course.

122M, 222M, 322M. Studies in Mechanical Engineering.
One, two, or three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

324. Kinematics and Dynamics of Mechanical Systems.
Analysis of motions, forces, momenta, and energies in mechanical systems. Mechanical Engineering 324 and 324H may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Engineering Mechanics 306S with a grade of at least C, Mathematics 408D with a grade of at least C, and admission to an appropriate major sequence in engineering.

325L. Cooperative Engineering.
This course covers the work period of mechanical engineering students in the Cooperative Engineering Program. Forty laboratory hours a week for three semesters. Only one of the following may be counted: Mechanical Engineering 325L, 362K, 371K, 377K. The student must complete Mechanical Engineering 325LX, 325LY, and 325LZ before a grade and degree credit are awarded. Prerequisite: For 325LX, application to become a member of the Cooperative Engineering Program, approval of the dean, and appointment for a full-time cooperative work tour; for 325LY, Mechanical Engineering 325LX and appointment for a full-time cooperative work tour; for 325LZ, Mechanical Engineering 325LY and appointment for a full-time cooperative work tour.

326. Thermodynamics.
Properties, heat and work, first and second laws, thermodynamic processes, introduction to ideal power cycles. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. For some sections, two discussion hours a week are also required; these sections are identified in the Course Schedule. Prerequisite: Chemistry 301, Mathematics 408D, and Physics 303K with a grade of at least C in each.

326H. Thermodynamics: Honors.
Properties, heat and work, first and second laws, thermodynamic processes, introduction to ideal power cycles. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. For some sections, two discussion hours a week are also required; these sections are identified in the Course Schedule. Mechanical Engineering 326 and 326H may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Chemistry 301, Mathematics 408D, and Physics 303K with a grade of at least C in each, and admission to an engineering honors program.

328. Thermodynamics II.
Power and refrigeration cycles; nonreactive and reactive mixtures; chemical equilibrium; real gas behavior; availability. Mechanical Engineering 328 and 343 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 326 or 326H with a grade of at least C and admission to an appropriate major sequence in engineering.

330. Fluid Mechanics.
Fluid properties, statics, conservation laws, inviscid and viscous incompressible flow, flow in confined streams and around objects. Civil Engineering 319F and Mechanical Engineering 330 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Mathematics 427K with a grade of at least C, Engineering Mechanics 306S, Mechanical Engineering 326 or 326H with a grade of at least C, and admission to an appropriate major sequence in engineering.

333H. Technical Communication: Honors.
Advanced technical communication skills, with emphasis on writing strategies for technical documents, oral presentations, and visual aids. Two lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Mechanical Engineering 333H and 333T may not both be counted. Prerequisite: English 316K with a grade of at least C and admission to an appropriate major sequence in engineering and to an engineering honors program.

333T. Technical Communication.
Advanced technical communication skills, with emphasis on writing strategies for technical documents, oral presentations, and visual aids. Two lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Mechanical Engineering 333H and 333T may not both be counted. Prerequisite: English 316K with a grade of at least C, and admission to an appropriate major sequence in engineering.

334. Materials Engineering.
Fundamental aspects of the structure, properties, and behavior of engineering materials. Prerequisite: For engineering majors, Chemistry 301, Engineering Mechanics 306S, and Mathematics 408D with a grade of at least C in each, and admission to an appropriate major sequence in engineering; for others, upper-division standing and written consent of instructor. Mechanical Engineering 334 is normally taken concurrently with 134L.

134L. Materials Engineering Laboratory.
Hands-on experiments in materials science and engineering topics and microstructure-property relationships discussed in Mechanical Engineering 334. One lecture hour and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Mechanical Engineering 334 and admission to an appropriate major sequence in engineering. Mechanical Engineering 134L is normally taken concurrently with 334.

335. Probability and Statistics for Engineers.
Fundamentals of probability, distribution theory, data analysis and statistics, interval estimation, hypothesis testing, and statistical quality control. Prerequisite: Mathematics 408D with a grade of at least C and admission to an appropriate major sequence in engineering.

335M. Electric Machinery and Magnetic Devices.
Same as Electrical Engineering 335M. Transformers, motors, generators; starting, control, and protection of motors; emphasis on applications. Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 331K with a grade of at least C.

336. Materials Processing.
Casting, joining, forming, and machining; effects of processing on materials properties; materials selection. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 334 and 134L with a grade of at least C in each, Engineering Mechanics 319 with a grade of at least C, and admission to an appropriate major sequence in engineering. Mechanical Engineering 336 is normally taken concurrently with 136L.

136L. Materials Processing Laboratory.
Hands-on study of selected materials processing procedures and processing-microstructure-property relationships discussed in Mechanical Engineering 336. One lecture hour and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 134L and Engineering Mechanics 319 with a grade of at least C in each, credit or registration for Mechanical Engineering 336, and admission to an appropriate major sequence in engineering. Mechanical Engineering 136L is normally taken concurrently with 336.

337C. Introduction to Nuclear Power Systems.
Radioactivity, nuclear interactions: fission and fusion, fission reactors, nuclear power systems, nuclear power safety. Prerequisite: For engineering majors, Physics 303L and 103N with a grade of at least C in each and admission to an appropriate major sequence in engineering; for nonengineering majors, upper-division standing and written consent of instructor.

337D. Radiation and Radiation Protection.
Atoms and X rays; nuclei and nuclear radiations; radioactivity; nuclear reactions; interaction of radiations with matter; radiation dosimetry; biological effects of radiation; radiation protection and regulatory standards. Prerequisite: For engineering majors, Physics 303L and 103N with a grade of at least C in each and admission to an appropriate major sequence in engineering; for nonengineering majors, upper-division standing and written consent of instructor.

337E. Radioactive Waste Management.
An introduction to radioactive waste management, including waste forms; regulation and siting; public health and environmental issues; remediation and stabilization; low- and high-level waste management; air dispersion; and radioactive groundwater transport. Prerequisite: For engineering majors, Physics 303L and 103N with a grade of at least C in each and admission to an appropriate major sequence in engineering; for others, upper-division standing and written consent of instructor.

338. Machine Elements.
Analysis for the design and manufacture of basic mechanical elements, and their role in the design of machines; application of finite element modeling. Prerequisite: Engineering Mechanics 319 and Mechanical Engineering 334 with a grade of at least C in each, and admission to an appropriate major sequence in engineering.

339. Heat Transfer.
Steady and transient heat conduction; forced and natural convection; radiation; introduction to phase change heat transfer and to heat exchangers. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 318 (or 218), Mechanical Engineering 330 with a grade of at least C, and admission to an appropriate major sequence in engineering.

242L. Thermal-Fluid Laboratory.
Experimental design concepts, uncertainty analysis and systems analysis as applied to thermodynamics, fluid mechanics and heat transfer systems. One lecture hour and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 335 and 339 and admission to an appropriate major sequence in engineering.

343. Thermal-Fluid Systems.
Analysis and design of integrated systems involving simultaneous application of thermodynamics, heat transfer, and fluid mechanics. Applications to power generation, vehicle engineering, materials processing, environmental control, and manufacturing. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 326 or 326H with a grade of at least C, and Mechanical Engineering 339.

344. Dynamic Systems and Controls.
Lumped physical system models; electrical, fluid, mechanical, and thermal system analysis; linear system transient, steady-state behavior; introduction to feedback control. Prerequisite: Mathematics 427K and Mechanical Engineering 324 or 324H with a grade of at least C in each, credit or registration for Electrical Engineering 331K and Mechanical Engineering 338, and admission to an appropriate major sequence in engineering.

244L. Dynamic Systems and Controls Laboratory.
Modeling of engineering systems, digital simulation, and assessment of results with experimental study; methods for analysis of first- and second-order systems, system identification, frequency response and feedback control principles; hands-on experimentation with mechanical, fluid, electrical, and magnetic systems; data acquisition and analysis using oscilloscopes and microcomputer-based analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog conversion; theoretical and practical principles governing the design and use of various sensors and transducers. One lecture hour and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 335, credit or registration for Mechanical Engineering 344, and admission to an appropriate major sequence in engineering.

347. Processing of Materials.
Analysis of forces in processing operations; effects of friction and their control; metalworking efficiencies. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: For engineering majors, Mechanical Engineering 336, credit or registration for Mechanical Engineering 136L, and admission to an appropriate major sequence in engineering; for nonengineering majors, upper-division standing and written consent of instructor.

Topic 1: Powder Processing. Powder particle characterization and size/shape/distribution, powder synthesis, compaction, sintering theory, sintering maps, full-density processing, powder-processed part microstructure and properties.

Topic 2: Deformation Processing. Analysis of forces in processing operations; effects of friction and their control; slab method; upper-bound force theory; slip-line field theory; metalworking efficiencies.

348. Introduction to Mechatronics.
Interfacing microcomputers with sensors and actuators; hybrid (analog/digital) design; digital logic and analog circuitry; data acquisition and control; microcomputer architecture, assembly language programming; signal conditioning, filters, analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog conversion. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: For engineering majors, Electrical Engineering 331K and admission to an appropriate major sequence in engineering; for nonengineering majors, upper-division standing and written consent of instructor.

349. Corrosion Engineering.
Corrosion principles; electrochemical, environmental, and metallurgical effects; types of corrosion; corrosion testing and prevention; modern theories: principles and applications. Prerequisite: For engineering majors, Mechanical Engineering 334 or the equivalent with a grade of at least C, an introductory course in thermodynamics, and admission to an appropriate major sequence in engineering; for nonengineering majors, upper-division standing and written consent of instructor.

350. Machine Tool Operations for Engineers.
Hands-on manual and computer-numerical-controlled machine tool operation. Part design and tool selection for production. One lecture hour and six laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Mechanical Engineering 350 and 379M (Topic 7: Machine Tool Operations for Engineers) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Admission to an appropriate major sequence in engineering.

352K. Engineering Computer Graphics.
Introduction to interactive computer graphics as a tool in computer-aided design. Use of graphics software packages. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: For engineering majors, admission to an appropriate major sequence in engineering; for others, upper-division standing and written consent of instructor.

353. Engineering Economic Analysis.
Techniques of economic analysis for engineering decisions; economic evaluation, mathematical models, risk analysis, and introduction to engineering cost estimation. Three lecture hours and two discussion hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Mathematics 408C with a grade of at least C and admission to an appropriate major sequence in engineering.

354. Biomedical Engineering.
Introduction to engineering analysis of transport phenomena in living systems, including fluid flow, heat transfer, pharmacokinetics, and membrane fluxes with clinical applications. Prerequisite: For engineering majors, Mathematics 427K with a grade of at least C and admission to an appropriate major sequence in engineering; for nonengineering majors, upper-division standing and written consent of instructor.

354M. Biomechanics of Human Movement.
Modeling and simulation of human movement; neuromuscular control; computer applications; introduction to experimental techniques. Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: For engineering majors, admission to an appropriate major sequence in engineering; for nonengineering majors, upper-division standing and written consent of instructor.

355K. Fundamentals of Engineering Vibrations.
Time-domain and frequency-domain analysis of vibrating systems; matrix methods, instrumentation, and vibration control; numerical methods. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 324 (or 324H) with a grade of at least C, Mathematics 427K with a grade of at least C, and admission to an appropriate major sequence in engineering.

259. Materials Selection.
Description of commercial metals, polymers, ceramics, concrete, and wood for use in mechanical engineering applications. Applications include strength, toughness, stiffness, fatigue, creep, corrosion, casting, forming, machining, and welding. Two lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: For engineering majors, Mechanical Engineering 336 and admission to an appropriate major sequence in engineering; for nonengineering majors, upper-division standing and written consent of instructor.



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Undergraduate catalog

Contents  |  Chapter 1  |  Chapter 2  |  Chapter 3  |  Chapter 4
Chapter 5  |  Chapter 6  |  Chapter 7  |  Chapter 8  |  Chapter 9
Chapter 10  |  Chapter 11  |  Chapter 12  |  Chapter 13
Texas Common Course Numbering System (Appendix A)
Appendix B


Related information

Catalogs  |  Course Schedules  |  Academic Calendars
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Office of the Registrar
University of Texas at Austin

11 September 1998. Registrar's Web Team
Comments to rgcat@utxdp.dp.utexas.edu