UT AUSTIN
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UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG
1998 - 2000


CONTENTS

CHAPTER 1
The University

CHAPTER 2
School of Architecture

CHAPTER 3
College of Business Administration

CHAPTER 4
College of Communication

CHAPTER 5
College of Education

CHAPTER 6
College of Engineering

CHAPTER 7
College of Fine Arts

CHAPTER 8
College of Liberal Arts

CHAPTER 9
College of Natural Sciences

CHAPTER 10
School of Nursing

CHAPTER 11
College of Pharmacy

CHAPTER 12
School of Social Work

CHAPTER 13
The Faculty

Texas Common Course Numbering System
(Appendix A)

APPENDIX B
Degree and Course Abbreviations

  CHAPTER EIGHT CONTENTS
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 Chapter 8
 Liberal Arts
  continued


Courses

The faculty has approval to offer the following courses in the academic years 1998-1999 and 1999-2000; however, all courses are not taught each semester or summer session. Students should consult the Course Schedule to determine which courses and topics will be offered during a particular semester or summer session. The Course Schedule may also reflect changes that have been made to the courses listed here since this catalog was printed.

A full explanation of course numbers is given in General Information. In brief, the first digit of a course number indicates the semester hour value of the course. The second and third digits indicate the rank of the course: if they are 01 through 19, the course is of lower-division rank; if 20 through 79, of upper-division rank; if 80 through 99, of graduate rank.

Humanities Program

Unless otherwise stated in the description below, each class meets for three lecture hours a week for one semester.

Humanities: HMN

Lower-Division Courses

101. Community Service.
Tutorial course, in which the student submits a report based on a community service project and appropriate supplementary reading. Conference course. Prerequisite: Consent of the humanities adviser.

305. Freshman Seminar.
Reading, discussion, writing, and oral reporting on various humanities topics. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Advanced placement credit for English 306 or the equivalent.

Upper-Division Courses

320. Core Course in the Humanities.
Analysis of major historical periods: their literature, philosophy, art, music, and architecture. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

321. Humanism and Western Civilization: The Ancient World.
A history of humanism in ancient Greece and Rome. The contributions of humanism to the values we place on the individual and human potential, democratic government, the arts, religion, and the family. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

322. Humanism and Western Civilization: The Renaissance.
A history of humanism during the European Renaissance, the thirteenth through the sixteenth century. The contributions of humanism to the values we place on the individual and human potential, democratic government, the arts, religion, and the family. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

323. Humanism and Western Civilization: The Enlightenment.
A history of humanism during the Enlightenment. The contributions of humanism to the values we place on the individual and human potential, democratic government, the arts, religion, and the family. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

125K. The Arts, Sciences, and Social Sciences.
Analysis of topics in the arts, sciences, and social sciences through reading, discussion, and lectures. One lecture hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Consent of the humanities adviser.

335. Topics in Italian Culture from Antiquity through the Renaissance.
The beliefs, images, and ideas in Italian culture from antiquity through the Renaissance. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

350. Topics in the Humanities.
Study of the values underlying humanistic disciplines. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: Shakespeare: Music and Visual Arts.

Topic 2: Daily Life in Northern Europe.

Topic 3: Geography and Religion. Same as Geography 358E and Middle Eastern Studies 322K (Topic 15: Geography and Religion). Ideas about the relationships among the natural world, myth, and ritual; principal focus on Christianity, Islam, and Judaism and their offshoots and antagonists in the Western world. Geography 356T (Topic: Geography and Religion) and Humanities 350 (Topic 3) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

Topic 4: Renaissance Art: Beliefs, Images, and Ideas. Same as Religious Studies 361 (Topic 30: Renaissance Art: Beliefs, Images, and Ideas). The content (not the aesthetics or the technical, compositional features) of selected Renaissance paintings, sculptures, and prints.

370. Senior Tutorial Course.
A tutorial program of supervised reading and writing, including an individual paper or papers in which the student draws together the central directions and discoveries of his or her studies in the humanities. Humanities 370 and 679HB may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Consent of the humanities adviser.

379. Conference Course.
Individual instruction in a topic approved by the instructor and the humanities adviser. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and consent of the humanities adviser.

679H. Honors Tutorial Course.
Directed reading and research, followed by the writing of a report or the creation of a project. Conference course for two semesters. Humanities 370 and 679HB may not both be counted. Prerequisite: For 679HA, admission to the Humanities Honors Program and consent of the humanities adviser; for 679HB, Humanities 679HA.

Jewish Studies

Unless otherwise stated in the description below, each class meets for three lecture hours a week for one semester.

Jewish Studies: J S

Lower-Division Courses

303. Introduction to Jewish Culture and History.
Same as Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures 303, Middle Eastern Studies 303, and Religious Studies 303. An introduction to Jewish life from the biblical period to the Holocaust, the rise of modern Israel, and the tumultuous present. Only one of the following may be counted: Jewish Studies 303, Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures 341 (Topic: Introduction to Jewish Culture and History), Middle Eastern Studies 322K (Topic: Introduction to Jewish Culture and History), Oriental and African Languages and Literatures 341 (Topic: Introduction to Jewish Culture and History), Religious Studies 361 (Topic: Introduction to Jewish Culture and History).

311. Topics in Jewish Studies.
May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Topic 1: Women and Gender in Judaism. Same as Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures 309 (Topic 1: Women and Gender in Judaism), Middle Eastern Studies 310 (Topic 2: Women and Gender in Judaism), Religious Studies 311 (Topic 4: Women and Gender in Judaism), and Women's Studies 301 (Topic 9: Women and Gender in Judaism). Only one of the following may be counted: Jewish Studies 311 (Topic 1), 361 (Topic: Women and Gender in Judaism), Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures 341 (Topic: Women and Gender in Judaism), Middle Eastern Studies 325 (Topic: Women and Gender in Judaism), Religious Studies 361 (Topic: Women and Gender in Judaism), Women's Studies 340 (Topic: Women and Gender in Judaism).

Upper-Division Courses

361. Topics in Jewish Studies.
Three lecture hours a week for one semester; additional hours may be required for some topics. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: Jewish Prayer: The Siddur. Same as Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures 341 (Topic 13: Jewish Prayer: The Siddur), Middle Eastern Studies 320 (Topic 12: Jewish Prayer: The Siddur), and Religious Studies 361 (Topic 29: Jewish Prayer: The Siddur). The philosophical basis, nature, and historical development of Jewish prayer as it is reflected in the Jewish prayer book, the Siddur. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

Topic 2: Rome and Jerusalem. Same as History 321G, Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures 341 (Topic 7: Rome and Jerusalem), Middle Eastern Studies 320 (Topic 2: Rome and Jerusalem), and Religious Studies 361 (Topic 24: Rome and Jerusalem). A study of daily life in Israel during the Roman period, focusing on Jerusalem, ancient Palestinian synagogues and churches, Jewish and Christian symbolism, agriculture, warfare, and burial practices. Only one of the following may be counted: History 366N (Topic: Rome and Jerusalem), Jewish Studies 361 (Topic 2), Oriental and African Languages and Literatures 341 (Topic 29: Rome and Jerusalem). Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

Topic 3: The Bible and History. Same as History 372P, Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures 341 (Topic 1: The Bible and History), Middle Eastern Studies 320 (Topic 3: The Bible and History), and Religious Studies 361 (Topic 14: The Bible and History). Designed to show the critical uses of biblical and extra-biblical data for a reconstruction of the history of the biblical period. Jewish Studies 361 (Topic 3) and Oriental and African Languages and Literatures 372 (Topic 20: The Bible and History) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

Topic 4: Dead Sea Scrolls. Same as History 366N (Topic 8: Dead Sea Scrolls), Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures 341 (Topic 14: Dead Sea Scrolls), Middle Eastern Studies 320 (Topic 13: Dead Sea Scrolls), and Religious Studies 361 (Topic 31: Dead Sea Scrolls). Prerequisite: Upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

Topic 5: Yiddish Drama and Film in Translation. Same as English 322 (Topic 34: Yiddish Drama and Film in Translation); Germanic Civilization 327E (Topic 8: Yiddish Drama and Film in Translation); Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies 325 (Topic 8: Yiddish Drama and Film in Translation); and Slavic 324 (Topic 2: Yiddish Drama and Film in Translation). Jewish life in Poland and Russia before the Holocaust, and the transition to American Jewish life, as revealed in plays and films produced in Eastern Europe and in the United States. No knowledge of Yiddish is required. Only one of the following may be counted: English 323M (Topic: Yiddish Drama and Film in Translation), Jewish Studies 361 (Topic 5), Post-Soviet and East European Studies 325 (Topic: Yiddish Drama and Film in Translation). Prerequisite: For English majors, nine semester hours of lower-division English, including English 316K or the equivalent; for others, upper-division standing.

Topic 6: Israeli Cinema and Television. Same as Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures 372 (Topic 15: Israeli Cinema and Television) and Middle Eastern Studies 325 (Topic 2: Israeli Cinema and Television). Israeli culture and society as expressed in films and television programs. Three lecture hours and one two-hour film screening a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Jewish Studies 361 (Topic 6), Middle Eastern Studies 322K (Topic: Israeli Cinema and Television), Oriental and African Languages and Literatures 372 (Topic: Israeli Cinema), 372 (Topic: Israeli Cinema and Television), Radio-Television-Film 345 (Topic 2: Israeli Cinema and Television). Prerequisite: Upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

362. Independent Research in Jewish Studies.
Tutorially directed research in Jewish studies. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and consent of instructor.



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Undergraduate catalog

Contents  |  Chapter 1  |  Chapter 2  |  Chapter 3  |  Chapter 4
Chapter 5  |  Chapter 6  |  Chapter 7  |  Chapter 8  |  Chapter 9
Chapter 10  |  Chapter 11  |  Chapter 12  |  Chapter 13
Texas Common Course Numbering System (Appendix A)
Appendix B


Related information

Catalogs  |  Course Schedules  |  Academic Calendars
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Office of the Registrar
University of Texas at Austin

11 September 1998. Registrar's Web Team
Comments to rgcat@utxdp.dp.utexas.edu