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Bachelor of Science in Aerospace Engineering

The field of aerospace engineering developed because of humanity's desire for aircraft systems for military, commercial, and civilian purposes; it was first called aeronautical engineering or aeronautics. When the space age began, it was natural for aeronautical engineers to participate in the development of spacecraft systems for space exploration. This branch of engineering became known as astronautical engineering or astronautics, and the combined field is called aerospace engineering or aeronautics and astronautics. Because of the diverse nature of the work, the aerospace engineer must have a basic knowledge of physics, mathematics, digital computation, and the various disciplines of aerospace engineering: aerodynamics and propulsion, structural mechanics, flight mechanics and orbital mechanics, and control. Because of their extensive education in fundamental disciplines, aerospace engineers can work in areas other than aerospace engineering and are employed in a wide range of careers.

The aerospace engineering curriculum allows the student to obtain a sound background in science, mathematics, and engineering. The first two years emphasize fundamental material along with engineering sciences, while the third year introduces concepts in the areas of fluid mechanics, structural mechanics, system dynamics and control, and experimentation. The fourth year provides further depth in aerospace engineering, with emphasis on design and laboratory courses. Upon entering the major sequence, the student elects to pursue either of two technical areas, atmospheric flight or space flight. The courses required for each option are listed below. Both area options are complemented by general education courses and courses offered in other engineering disciplines. In addition, the student may choose technical electives that increase the breadth of the program or that provide additional depth within one or more subdisciplines. All of the following subdisciplines are also represented in the required courses for both technical area options.

Aerodynamics and propulsion. This subdiscipline embraces study in one of the more traditional areas of aerospace engineering. It involves fluid motion, propulsion, lift and drag on wings and other bodies, high-speed heating effects, and wind tunnel investigation of these problems. Topics of study include fluid mechanics, gas dynamics, heat transfer, aerodynamics, propulsion, and experimental fluid mechanics.

Structural mechanics. This subdiscipline includes the study of airplane, spacecraft, and missile structures, the materials that make them efficient, and methods for testing, analysis, and design of new structural systems. Course topics include structural analysis, structural dynamics, materials (including advanced composites), aeroelasticity, experimental structural mechanics, and computer-aided design of structures.

Flight mechanics and orbital mechanics. Flight mechanics involves the analysis of the motion of aircraft, missiles, rockets, reentry vehicles, and spacecraft that are subjected to gravitational, propulsive, and aerodynamic forces; the study of uncontrolled motion of satellites and coasting spacecraft is usually referred to as orbital mechanics. Subject matter in these areas includes trajectory analysis and optimization; attitude dynamics, stability, and control; flight test; orbit determination; orbital operations; and simulation.

Flight control. Control theory is applied in aerospace engineering to the development of automatic flight control systems for aircraft (autopilots and stability augmentation systems), attitude control systems for satellites, and guidance and control systems for missiles, rockets, reentry vehicles, and spacecraft. Course topics include linear system theory, classical control theory, digital control, and probability theory.

Curriculum

Course requirements are divided into three categories: basic sequence courses, major sequence courses, and other required courses. Enrollment in major sequence courses is restricted to students who have received credit for all of the basic sequence courses and have been admitted to the major sequence by the College of Engineering Admissions Committee. (Requirements for admission to a major sequence are given in this chapter.) Enrollment in other required courses is not restricted by completion of the basic sequence.

Courses used to fulfill technical and nontechnical elective requirements must be approved by the aerospace engineering faculty before the student enrolls in them. Courses that fulfill the social science and fine arts/humanities requirements are listed above.

Courses Semester Hours

Basic Sequence Courses
Aerospace Engineering 201, 102, 211, Chemistry 301, Engineering Mechanics 306S, 311M, 319, English 306, 316K, Mathematics 408C, 408D, 427K, 427L, Mechanical Engineering 210, Physics 303K, 303L, 103M, 103N 49

Major Sequence Courses
Aerospace Engineering 320, 120K, 221K, 121M, 324L, 330M, 340, 363Q, 365, 366K, 367K, 167M, 369K, 370L, 376K 38
Approved communication elective (Civil Engineering 333T or another course approved by the department) 3
Technical area courses 7
Approved technical electives 6

Other Required Courses
Electrical Engineering 331K, Mechanical Engineering 326 6
American government, including Texas government 6
American history 6
Approved natural science elective 3
Approved social science elective 3
Approved fine arts or humanities elective 3

Minimum Required 130

Technical Area Options

The technical area option allows the student to choose seven semester hours of technical area courses in either atmospheric flight or space flight. Each student should choose a technical area by the end of the first semester of the junior year and plan an academic program to meet the area requirements in the next three semesters. Many students choose technical electives that will strengthen their backgrounds in one specialty area, but this is not required. It should be noted that a student may choose the technical area courses in the other technical area as electives and that, with the addition of only one semester hour beyond the minimum number required, the student can complete all required courses in both technical areas. This route provides a greater emphasis on the design process. The technical area courses should be taken in the order in which they are listed.

Area I, Atmospheric Flight

Also called aeronautics, this area provides the student with a well-rounded program of study emphasizing the major disciplines of aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, design, performance, and control of aircraft. These subjects are treated at a fundamental level that lays a foundation for work in a broad variety of specialties in the aircraft industry. This option is intended for the undergraduate student whose primary interest is aircraft.

Aerospace Engineering 362K, Compressible Fluid Mechanics
Aerospace Engineering 162M, Applied Compressible Fluid Mechanics
Aerospace Engineering 261K, Aircraft Design
Aerospace Engineering 161M, Aircraft Design Laboratory

Area II, Space Flight

Also called astronautics, this area composes a well-rounded program of study that provides a background in the traditional areas of fluid mechanics, materials, structures, propulsion, controls, and flight mechanics, while also giving the student a chance to learn about the space environment, attitude determination and control, orbital mechanics, mission design, and spacecraft systems and design. These subjects are treated at a fundamental level that lays a foundation for work in a broad variety of specialties in space-related industries. This option is intended for the undergraduate student whose primary interest is space and spacecraft.

Aerospace Engineering 166M, Space Applications Laboratory
Aerospace Engineering 372K, Advanced Spacecraft Dynamics
Aerospace Engineering 274L, Spacecraft/Mission Design Principles
Aerospace Engineering 174M, Spacecraft/Mission Design Laboratory

Suggested Arrangement of Courses

First Year--Fall Semester

Courses Semester Hours

ASE 102, Introduction to Aerospace Engineering 1
CH 301, Principles of Chemistry I 3
E 306, Rhetoric and Composition 3
M 408C, Differential and Integral Calculus 4
M E 210, Engineering Design Graphics 2
Social science or fine arts/humanities elective 3
Total 16
First Year--Spring Semester

Courses Semester Hours

ASE 201, Introduction to Computer Programming 2
M 408D, Sequences, Series, and Multivariable Calculus 4
PHY 303K, Engineering Physics I 3
PHY 103M, Laboratory for Physics 303K 1
American government 3
Social science or fine arts/humanities elective 3
Total 16
Second Year--Fall Semester

Courses Semester Hours

ASE 211, Engineering Computation 2
E 316K, Masterworks of Literature 3
E M 306S, Statics and Dynamics 3
M 427K, Advanced Calculus for
Applications I
4
PHY 303L, Engineering Physics II 3
PHY 103N, Laboratory for Physics 303L 1
Total 16
Second Year--Spring Semester

Courses Semester Hours

E M 311M, Dynamics 3
E M 319, Mechanics of Solids 3
M 427L, Advanced Calculus for
Applications II
4
M E 326, Thermodynamics I 3
Approved natural science elective 3
Total 16
Third Year--Fall Semester

Courses Semester Hours

ASE 320, Introduction to Fluid Mechanics 3
ASE 120K, Applications of Fluid Mechanics 1
ASE 221K, Structural Analysis 2
ASE 121M, Structural Analysis Laboratory 1
ASE 330M, Linear System Analysis 3
ASE 366K, Spacecraft Dynamics 3
E E 331K, Electric Circuits and Electronics 3
Total 16
Third Year--Spring Semester

Courses Semester Hours

ASE 365, Structural Dynamics 3
ASE 367K, Flight Dynamics 3
ASE 369K, Measurements and Instrumentation 3
ASE 376K, Propulsion 3
C E 333T, Technical Communication 3
American history 3
Total 18
Fourth Year--Fall Semester

Courses Semester Hours

ASE 324L, Aerospace Materials Laboratory 3
ASE 340, Boundary Layer Theory and Heat Transfer 3
ASE 167M, Flight Dynamics Laboratory 1
ASE 370L, Flight Control Systems 3
Technical area courses 4
Approved technical elective 3
Total 17
Fourth Year--Spring Semester

Courses Semester Hours

ASE 363Q, Design and Testing of Aerospace Structures 3
Technical area courses 3
American government 3
American history 3
Approved technical elective 3
Total 15

Bachelor of Science in Architectural Engineering

An unprecedented growth in the building industry, already one of the largest industries in the nation, has created a pressing demand for engineers with specialized training to plan and direct the activities of the industry. This need has been further intensified by the introduction of new materials, new structural systems, and new methods and management techniques. The curriculum in architectural engineering is designed to meet this demand. It offers training in the fundamentals of engineering, with specialization in structural engineering, construction engineering and project management, environmental systems for buildings, or construction materials.

This curriculum affords the student the opportunity to attain competence in the structural design of buildings from high-rise to long-span structures and from commercial buildings to complex industrial facilities. Courses in environmental control systems permit graduates to integrate modern electrical, mechanical, and utility distribution systems with the structural and architectural elements of buildings. Courses in construction methods and project management offer the student an opportunity to obtain a versatile background suitable for all areas of the building industry.

The extensive technical requirements, coupled with courses in arts and sciences, provide the architectural engineering graduate with an opportunity to obtain a background that is ideally suited for careers and positions of responsibility with consulting engineers, general contractors, manufacturers, government agencies, and architecture firms. The curriculum also serves as an excellent springboard to graduate study in the areas of structural engineering, construction engineering and project management, environmental systems for buildings, and construction materials.

Dual Degree Program in Architectural Engineering and Architecture

A program that leads to both the Bachelor of Science in Architectural Engineering degree and the Bachelor of Architecture degree is available to qualified students. The program combines the course requirements of both degrees and requires six years for completion. Students who wish to pursue both degrees must apply for admission to the School of Architecture according to the procedures and deadlines established by the school. The program is described in chapter 2; additional information is available from the undergraduate adviser for architectural engineering.

Curriculum

Course requirements are divided into three categories: basic sequence courses, major sequence courses, and other required courses. Enrollment in major sequence courses is restricted to students who have received credit for all of the basic sequence courses and have been admitted to the major sequence by the College of Engineering Admissions Committee. (Requirements for admission to a major sequence are given in this chapter.) Enrollment in other required courses is not restricted by completion of the basic sequence.

Courses used to fulfill technical and nontechnical elective requirements must be approved by the architectural engineering faculty before the student enrolls in them. Courses that fulfill the social science and fine arts/humanities requirements are listed above.

Courses Semester Hours

Basic Sequence Courses
Architectural Engineering 102, Chemistry 301, Civil Engineering 311K, 311S, 314K, Engineering Mechanics 306S, 319, English 306, 316K, Mathematics 408C, 408D, 427K, Physics 303K, 303L, 103M, 103N 45

Major Sequence Courses
Architectural Engineering 320K, 320L, 323K, 125, 235K, 235L, 346K, 346L, 362L, 465, 366, Civil Engineering 319F, 329, 331, 333T, 335, 357 48
Approved technical electives 6

Other Required Courses
Electrical Engineering 331, Geology 312K, Mechanical Engineering 320 9
American government, including Texas government 6
American history 6
Approved architectural history elective[1] 3
Approved social science elective 3
Approved mathematics/science elective 3

Minimum Required 129

Technical Electives

Technical electives in architectural engineering are listed in four areas of specialization below. Six semester hours, the "approved technical electives," must be chosen from the following technical area courses or selected with the approval of the chairman. Lower-division courses may not be used as technical electives.

Area I, Structural Engineering

Structural engineering is of special interest to the student who plans to pursue a career in the structural analysis and design of buildings for a consulting firm, in industry, or in research. Emphasis is on analysis of indeterminate structures and current design procedures in foundations, reinforced concrete, metals, and timber.

Architectural Engineering 345K, Masonry Engineering
Civil Engineering 362M, Advanced Reinforced Concrete Design
Civil Engineering 362N, Advanced Steel Design
Civil Engineering 362P, Prestressed Concrete Design
Civil Engineering 363, Advanced Structural Analysis

Area II, Construction Engineering and Project Management

Construction engineering and project management integrates the technical education of engineering with the financial, legal, and administrative skills required for business management. The expected growth of construction volume and the increasing complexity of projects should provide engineering management career opportunities with construction companies, construction management consultants, government agencies, educational institutions, material suppliers, real estate firms, and others.

Architectural Engineering 358, Construction Cost Estimating
Civil Engineering 352, Civil Engineering Measurements
Mechanical Engineering 366L, Operations Research Models

Area III, Environmental Systems for Buildings

This area emphasizes the design of controlled and comfortable environments in buildings and industrial facilities. Special attention is given to water distribution and sanitary waste in buildings; heating, ventilating, and air conditioning; noise and vibration control; and illumination. Graduates are prepared to seek employment with consulting firms and industries that specialize in the selection and design of mechanical, electrical, and acoustical systems and equipment for buildings.

Mechanical Engineering 339, Heat Transfer
Mechanical Engineering 374L, Design of Thermal Systems
Mechanical Engineering 374R, Air Conditioning Systems Design
Mechanical Engineering 374S, Solar Energy Systems Design
Mechanical Engineering 379N, Noise and Vibration Control

Area IV, Construction Materials

The construction materials area is of special interest to the student who plans a career in materials testing, forensic engineering, or building materials research and development.

Civil Engineering 351, Construction Materials
Civil Engineering 366K, Design of Bituminous Mixtures
Civil Engineering 366M, Modern Pavement Materials
Mechanical Engineering 349, Corrosion Engineering
Mechanical Engineering 360K, Introduction to Phase Transformations
Mechanical Engineering 370K, Structure and Properties of Materials
Mechanical Engineering 378K, Mechanical Behavior of Materials

Suggested Arrangement of Courses

First Year--Fall Semester

Courses Semester Hours

ARE 102, Introduction to Architectural Engineering 1
CH 301, Principles of Chemistry I 3
E 306, Rhetoric and Composition 3
M 408C, Differential and Integral Calculus 4
Approved social science elective 3
Total 14
First Year--Spring Semester

Courses Semester Hours

C E 311K, Introduction to Computer Methods 3
GEO 312K, Geology of Engineering 3
M 408D, Sequences, Series, and Multivariable Calculus 4
PHY 303K, Engineering Physics I 3
PHY 103M, Laboratory for Physics 303K 1
American government[2] 3
Total 17
Second Year--Fall Semester

Courses Semester Hours

C E 311S, Elementary Statistics for Civil Engineers 3
E M 306S, Statics and Dynamics 3
M 427K, Advanced Calculus for
Applications I
4
PHY 303L, Engineering Physics II 3
PHY 103N, Laboratory for Physics 303L 1
Approved architectural history elective 3
Total 17
Second Year--Spring Semester

Courses Semester Hours

C E 314K, Properties and Behavior of Engineering Materials 3
E 316K, Masterworks of Literature 3
E M 319, Mechanics of Solids 3
American history 3
Approved mathematics/science elective 3
Total 15
Third Year--Fall Semester

Courses Semester Hours

ARE 320K, Introduction to Design I 3
ARE 125, Computer-Aided Design and Graphics 1
ARE 235K, Materials and Methods of Building Construction I 2
ARE 346K, Environmental Systems I 3
C E 319F, Elementary Mechanics of Fluids 3
C E 329, Structural Analysis 3
American government 3
Total 18
Third Year--Spring Semester

Courses Semester Hours

ARE 320L, Introduction to Design II 3
ARE 235L, Materials and Methods of Building Construction II 2
ARE 346L, Environmental Systems II 3
C E 333T, Technical Communication 3
C E 335, Elements of Steel Design 3
M E 320, Applied Thermodynamics 3
Total 17
Fourth Year--Fall Semester

Courses Semester Hours

ARE 323K, Project Management and Economics 3
ARE 362L, Wood Engineering Design 3
C E 331, Reinforced Concrete Design 3
E E 331, Electrical Circuits, Electronics, and Machinery 3
American history 3
Total 15
Fourth Year--Spring Semester

Courses Semester Hours

ARE 465, Integrated Design Project 4
ARE 366, Contracts, Liability, and Ethics 3
C E 357, Geotechnical Engineering 3
Approved technical electives 6
Total 16

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