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Graduation

Candidacy for Graduation

In accordance with University and College of Fine Arts regulations and policies, a student may choose an undergraduate major offered by the college, but candidacy for graduation in any degree plan is contingent on the following approvals:

  1. Before beginning upper-division coursework in the major, the student must have the written approval of the faculty of the major in which he or she wants to graduate.
  2. A student who has previously undertaken upper-division coursework in the major (for example, a transfer student) must have the written approval of the faculty of the major in which he or she wants to graduate before continuing coursework in the major.

Special Requirements of the College of Fine Arts

All students must fulfill the general requirements for graduation given in chapter 1. Students in the College of Fine Arts must also fulfill the following requirements.

Residence

General requirements on coursework to be taken in residence are given in chapter 1. Unless an exception is approved by the adviser and the dean, a student in the College of Fine Arts must also complete in residence the last eighteen semester hours in the major subject counted toward the degree.

Grade Point Average

All University students must have a grade point average of at least 2.00 to graduate. In addition, a student in one of the following majors must meet special grade point requirements.

Studio art. A student majoring in studio art must have a grade point average of at least 2.50 for all upper-division studio art courses taken in residence at the University.

Art history. A student majoring in art history must have a grade point average of at least 2.50 for all upper-division art history courses taken in residence at the University.

Bachelor of Arts in Theatre and Dance. A student pursuing the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Theatre and Dance must have a grade point average of at least 2.50 in all upper-division courses undertaken in the Department of Theatre and Dance.

Teacher certification in art, theatre arts, or music. A student pursuing teacher certification must meet certain grade point average requirements during the course of the certification program. For information, consult the teacher certification officer, College of Education.

School of Music Special Requirements

Ensemble Requirement

Ensembles that may be used to fulfill the following requirements are designated by the School of Music. For information, the student should contact the undergraduate student office of the school. With the approval of the designated adviser, a student may enroll in more than one ensemble in a semester, but no more than one ensemble a semester may be used to fulfill this requirement.

Bachelor of Music
Students seeking this degree must complete in residence at least eight long-session semesters of ensemble approved by the School of Music. Transfer students must complete an approved ensemble each long-session semester in residence until they have completed eight semesters of ensemble or until they graduate, whichever comes first. A transfer student may count toward this requirement two semesters of transferred ensemble approved by the School of Music.

The ensemble requirement is waived for music studies majors during the student teaching semester.

Bachelor of Arts in Music
Students seeking this degree must complete in residence at least four long-session semesters of ensemble approved by the School of Music. Transfer students must complete an approved ensemble each long-session semester in residence until they have completed four semesters of ensemble or until they graduate, whichever comes first. A transfer student may count toward this requirement one semester of transferred ensemble approved by the School of Music.

Other Music Students
If required by the School of Music, music majors who are "unclassified majors" or "degree holders, but nondegree seekers" must complete an approved ensemble each long-session semester in residence.

Recital Requirement for Music Studies Majors

A student majoring in music studies must make one recital appearance during the last semester of study on the principal instrument.

Applying for a Degree Audit

At registration periods, each student normally receives an advising aid that summarizes his or her progress toward a degree. A degree audit, however, is the required statement from the Office of the Dean of the student's official standing in a College of Fine Arts degree program. Students who have completed at least seventy-five semester hours of coursework are required to have a current degree audit application on file. Only students with a current degree audit may apply for graduation.

Degree audit applications are submitted to the Office of the Dean (Student Division). To apply for a degree audit, the student must have completed at least one long-session semester in residence at the University and must have completed at least sixty semester hours of coursework.

After the audit is completed, a copy is mailed to the student. The student does not need to submit another degree audit application unless he or she changes majors, catalogs, or a degree option that affects the requirements of the program. For example, a new degree audit application must be submitted by a music major who changes the principal or major instrument.

The degree audit provides an accurate statement of the requirements, but the student is responsible for knowing the requirements for the degree as stated in a catalog under which he or she is entitled to graduate, for registering so as to fulfill all the requirements, and for meeting all deadlines. Before registering, the student should seek an official ruling from the Office of the Dean (Student Division) if in doubt about any requirement.

Applying for Graduation

In the semester or summer session he or she intends to graduate, the student must submit a graduation application to the Office of the Dean (Student Division) by the deadline given in the official academic calendar. A current degree audit must be on file at the time of the graduation application. Because the application process includes a review of all remaining degree requirements, candidates for graduation are encouraged to apply as early in the semester as possible. A student who applies for graduation but does not receive the degree must submit a new application in the semester he or she subsequently intends to graduate.

The student must be registered at the University for the semester or summer session in which the degree is to be granted. This requirement may be fulfilled by registering for courses in residence or by registering in absentia. For information about registration in absentia, the student should consult the Office of the Dean (Student Division) no later than the second week of the semester in which he or she intends to graduate.

Credit received by examination, correspondence, or transfer does not fulfill the residence requirement. If planning to receive credit by any of these means, the student must consult the Office of the Dean (Student Division) before the graduation semester for a ruling about whether the credit may be applied toward the degree and for information about the procedures and deadlines involving credit by examination, correspondence, and transfer.

No degree will be conferred unless all requirements have been fulfilled and all deadlines met.

Teacher Certification

To be recommended for a certificate to teach in Texas elementary or secondary schools, an undergraduate or graduate student must complete a University of Texas at Austin approved program for teacher preparation. The University maintains approved programs for art, theatre arts, and music, and students interested in one of these teaching areas ordinarily pursue the degree program in visual art studies, theatre studies, or music studies. For information about current teacher certification standards and the requirements for admission to the professional development sequence, the student should contact the teacher certification officer in the College of Education, George I. Sanchez Building 216, and the appropriate faculty adviser in art and art history, music, or theatre and dance.

Degrees

Degrees Offered

The College of Fine Arts offers a wide variety of degree programs. For undergraduate students who seek professional training in the arts or who feel the need for intensive training in their chosen art, the college offers the degrees of Bachelor of Fine Arts and Bachelor of Music. These degrees require that about two-thirds of the coursework be completed in the major area.

The student who wants a broad education with an emphasis in the arts may pursue the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Art, Bachelor of Arts in Music, or Bachelor of Arts in Theatre and Dance. These degrees require that about a third of the coursework be completed in the major area.

Department of Art and Art History

The Department of Art and Art History offers academic programs in studio art, art history, visual art studies, and design. Studio art instruction is given in drawing, painting, sculpture, photography, printmaking (intaglio, lithography, serigraphy), ceramics, metals, textiles, video art, transmedia art, and performance art. There is also a full range of instruction in art history and visual art studies; the latter includes an option leading to teacher certification in art. Students in design study technologies and methods and learn to deal creatively and critically with the dynamics of culture and technological progress.

The University's extensive resources for art research include the departmental Visual Resources Collection, the Fine Arts Library, the Archer M. Huntington Art Gallery, the Perry-Castaneda Library, and specialized collections such as the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the Classics Library, the Architecture and Planning Library, and the Benson Latin American Collection. While at the University, students also have access to the large permanent collection and traveling exhibitions.

Programs of study leading to the following undergraduate degrees are offered in the Department of Art and Art History.

    Bachelor of Fine Arts
      Studio art
      Design
      Art history
      Visual art studies
        Students who plan to pursue certification to teach art in Texas public schools should follow the visual art studies program.

    Bachelor of Arts in Art

      Studio art
      Art history

School of Music

The instructional programs in the School of Music are intended to meet a broad range of needs. Faculty members recognized for their professional and scholarly excellence teach courses extending from the traditional to the experimental, from the Western tradition to musics of diverse cultures from around the world, from individual instruction to more than twenty vocal and instrumental ensembles.

Facilities include the music building and the Performing Arts Center. Within the center are the Kate Broocks Bates Recital Hall, the Nancy Lee and Perry R. Bass Concert Hall, and the Ralph and Ruth McCullough Theatre, which are used for performances by students, faculty members, and guest artists. Also available are the academic recital hall and organ recital hall, as well as general and specialized studios such as chamber music rooms, harp studios, organ practice rooms, percussion studios, the choral, orchestra, and band rehearsal rooms, and the digital keyboard laboratory. Libraries including manuscripts, rare editions, and performance collections; a recording studio; a medieval and Renaissance instrument collection; an electronic and computer music center; a music education laboratory; and over one hundred individual practice modules are also available to students studying music at the University.

Programs of study leading to the following undergraduate degrees are offered in the School of Music.

    Bachelor of Music
      Performance
        Voice, piano, organ, harp, harpsichord, and orchestral instruments (including a concentration in jazz studies)
      Music theory
      Composition (including a concentration in jazz studies)
      Music studies
        Students who plan to pursue certification to teach music in Texas public schools should follow the music studies program.

    Bachelor of Arts in Music

Department of Theatre and Dance

The Department of Theatre and Dance serves students in all principal areas of theatre, drama, and dance. Students have an opportunity to choose programs of study leading to a variety of academic and professional goals.

The facilities of the department are among the best available to university programs in the United States. In addition to the performance areas, studios, and shops of the Performing Arts Center, the department has the B. Iden Payne Theatre, a flexible-space theatre, a laboratory theatre, an extensive costume collection, four dance studios, a drafting studio, and a creative drama room adjoining the classrooms and rehearsal studios in the F. Loren Winship Drama Building. Of special interest to students pursuing theatre research is the Hoblitzelle Theatre Arts Library, part of the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, which contains one of the world's most important collections of theatre material.

Programs of study leading to the following undergraduate degrees are offered in the Department of Theatre and Dance. Final approval of the Bachelor of Arts in Theatre and Dance is pending; contact the College of Fine Arts for more information.

    Bachelor of Fine Arts
      Theatre studies
        This program includes an option for students who plan to pursue certification to teach theatre arts in Texas public schools.
      Dance

    Bachelor of Arts in Theatre and Dance

Applicability of Certain Courses

Physical Activity Courses

Physical activity courses (PED) are offered by the Department of Kinesiology and Health Education. A limited number of these courses may be counted as electives toward degrees in the College of Fine Arts, but only at the discretion of the dean. All physical activity courses are counted among courses for which the student is enrolled, and the grades are included in the grade point average. For further information, contact the Office of the Dean (Student Division).

Bible Courses

Bible courses may be counted as lower-division electives in College of Fine Arts degree programs that have room for such electives. No more than twelve semester hours of such work may be counted toward any degree offered by the University.

Courses Taken on the Pass/Fail Basis

Regulations concerning courses taken on the pass/fail basis are given in General Information. For most degree programs in the College of Fine Arts, a very limited and restricted amount of coursework may be taken on the pass/fail basis. To be assured that a course taken on this basis will apply to the degree, the student must consult the Office of the Dean (Student Division) before enrolling in the course.

Credit by Examination, Correspondence, and Transfer

Credit that a student in residence earns by examination, correspondence, or extension will not be counted toward a degree in the College of Fine Arts unless specifically approved in advance by the dean.

Credit that the student earns at another institution while enrolled in residence at the University also will not be counted toward a degree in the college unless approved in advance by the dean. In addition to obtaining approval of the dean, the student should submit a request for concurrent enrollment to the Office of the Registrar.

A student planning to take coursework at another institution while not enrolled in residence at the University should also seek a ruling from the Office of the Dean as to whether the credit may be applied toward a degree and for information about procedures and deadlines. This ruling should be obtained before registering for the course.

No more than 10 percent of the semester hours required for any degree offered in the College of Fine Arts may be completed by correspondence.

Basic Education Requirements for All Programs except Music Performance

The following basic education requirements are part of all baccalaureate degree programs in the College of Fine Arts except those in music performance. Beyond this core, some degree programs include additional requirements in general education. Consult the degree program of interest for further information.

Writing: Both of the following requirements must be fulfilled.

  1. English: Six semester hours, consisting of English 306 or the equivalent and 316K or the equivalent. Courses used to fulfill this requirement may not also be counted toward the writing requirement below.
  2. Certified writing courses: In taking courses to fulfill other degree requirements, students must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component; at least one of these must be an upper-division course. If the writing requirement is not fulfilled by courses specified for the degree, the two courses certified as having a substantial writing component must be included within the electives or must be taken in addition to the minimum number of semester hours for the degree. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule. Students pursuing teacher certification should consult the University's teacher certification officer for information about the writing requirements for certification in Texas.
Foreign language: Demonstrated proficiency equivalent to that shown by completion of foreign language courses 506 and 507.

  1. This requirement may be fulfilled by
    1. Completing two high school units (two years) in a single foreign language.
    2. Earning college-level credit for courses 506 and 507 or their equivalents in a single foreign language. Credit may be earned either by examination or by completing the appropriate courses. Credit for courses 506 and 507 or their equivalents in the foreign language used to fulfill this requirement may not be counted toward a degree in the College of Fine Arts. To achieve proficiency in a foreign language as rapidly as possible, a qualified student may take accelerated courses in some languages. Information about these courses is available from the departments offering them.
  2. Some degree programs require proficiency in a specific foreign language. Consult the degree program of interest for pertinent requirements.
Courses used to fulfill the foreign language requirement must be language courses; literature-in-translation courses, for example, may not be used.

Social science: Fifteen semester hours:

  1. Six semester hours of American government, including Texas government, consisting of Government 310L and 312L or their equivalents.
  2. Six semester hours of American history.
  3. Three semester hours in one of the following areas:
    1. Anthropology
    2. Economics
    3. Geography
    4. Linguistics
    5. Psychology
    6. Sociology
Natural sciences and mathematics: Twelve semester hours as indicated below. Visual art studies, theatre studies, and music studies majors must complete at least one laboratory science course. A list of courses approved to fulfill this requirement is available in the Office of the Dean.

  1. Six semester hours in one of the following areas:
    1. Astronomy
    2. Biological science (biology, botany, microbiology, zoology)
    3. Chemistry
    4. Geology
    5. Marine science
    6. Physical science
    7. Physics
  2. Three semester hours of mathematics.
  3. Three additional semester hours of natural science (chosen from any of the areas of natural science listed above), mathematics, or computer sciences.
Fine arts: Six semester hours outside the student's major department, chosen from Art History 301, Music 302L, and Theatre and Dance 301.

Basic Education Requirements for Programs in Music Performance

The following basic education requirements are part of all baccalaureate degree programs in music performance. Beyond this core, some degree programs include additional requirements in general education. Consult the degree program of interest for further information.

Writing: Both of the following requirements must be fulfilled.

  1. English: Six semester hours, consisting of English 306 or the equivalent and 316K or the equivalent. Courses used to fulfill this requirement may not also be counted toward the writing requirement below.
  2. Certified writing courses: In taking courses to fulfill other degree requirements, students must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component; at least one of these must be an upper-division course. If the writing requirement is not fulfilled by courses specified for the degree, the two courses certified as having a substantial writing component must be included within the electives or must be taken in addition to the minimum number of semester hours for the degree. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.
Foreign language: Demonstrated proficiency equivalent to that shown by the completion of foreign language courses 506 and 507.

  1. This requirement may be fulfilled by
    1. Completing two high school units (two years) in a single foreign language.
    2. Earning college-level credit for courses 506 and 507 or their equivalents in a single foreign language. Credit may be earned either by examination or by completing the appropriate courses. Credit for courses 506 and 507 or their equivalents in the foreign language used to fulfill this requirement may not be counted toward a degree in the College of Fine Arts. To achieve proficiency in a foreign language as rapidly as possible, a qualified student may take accelerated courses in some languages. Information about these courses is available from the departments offering them.
  2. Some degree programs require proficiency in a specific foreign language. Consult the degree program of interest for pertinent requirements.
Courses used to fulfill the foreign language requirement must be language courses; literature-in-translation courses, for example, may not be used.

Social science: Twelve semester hours:

  1. Six semester hours of American government, including Texas government, consisting of Government 310L and 312L or their equivalents.
  2. Six semester hours of American history.
  3. Each student is encouraged to take additional elective coursework in social sciences such as anthropology, economics, geography, linguistics, psychology, and sociology.
Natural sciences and mathematics: Six semester hours:

  1. Three semester hours in one of the following areas:
    1. Astronomy
    2. Biological science (biology, botany, microbiology, zoology)
    3. Chemistry
    4. Geology
    5. Marine science
    6. Physical science
    7. Physics
  2. Three semester hours of mathematics.
  3. Each student is encouraged to take additional elective coursework in the natural sciences and mathematics.
Fine arts: Six semester hours: Art History 301 and Theatre and Dance 301.

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28 August 1996. Registrar's Web Team
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