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Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry is intended to prepare students for professional careers as chemists, either upon graduation or after graduate study in chemistry or related fields. In addition, it may serve as the basis for work in many areas outside pure chemistry, such as materials science, medicine and other health-related fields, pharmacology, patent law, business, and environmental science.

Prescribed Work

  1. English 306 and 316K. In addition, in taking courses to fulfill other degree requirements, the student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component; one of these courses must be upper-division. If the writing requirement is not fulfilled by courses specified for the degree, the student must fulfill it either with electives or with coursework taken in addition to the number of hours required for the degree. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.

  2. Courses 506 and 507 or the equivalent in a single foreign language, and a three-semester-hour course in the same language for which 507 or the equivalent is a prerequisite; or as much of this coursework as required by the student's score on the placement test. For students who enter the University with fewer than two high school units in a single foreign language, the first two semesters in a language may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree.

  3. Six semester hours of American government, including Texas government.

  4. Six semester hours of American history.

  5. Three semester hours in anthropology, economics, geography, linguistics, psychology, or sociology.

  6. Mathematics 408C and 408D and at least three semester hours of upper-division mathematics or upper-division computer sciences. Algebra courses at the level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics 301 or 304E without degree credit to remove their deficiency.

  7. Three semester hours in architecture, art (including art history, design, studio art, visual art studies), classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts, music (including music, instruments, ensemble), philosophy (excluding courses in logic), or theatre and dance.

  8. Physics 301, 101L, 316, and 116L.

  9. Six semester hours of coursework in the College of Natural Sciences (excluding chemistry) and the College of Engineering, chosen from the following courses: Biology 302, 206, Chemical Engineering 317, Computer Sciences 310, 315, Electrical Engineering 316, 319K, Engineering Mechanics 306S, 314, 319, Geology 404C, 405, 312K, 416K, 416L, 416M, Microbiology 226, 227, 129K, Nutrition 342, 344, 144M, 370, and Physics 315 and 115L. An upper-division science or engineering course may be counted toward this requirement if (a) it is designed for science or engineering majors, (b) it has as a prerequisite a course designed for science or engineering majors, or (c) it has as a prerequisite a course required for the degree. Courses used to fulfill this requirement should be chosen to reinforce the student's program and must be approved by the undergraduate adviser.

    The following courses may not be used to fulfill this requirement: Aerospace Engineering 327, 363L, Astronomy 321, 324, 367M, Chemical Engineering 357, 376, 376K, Mathematics 333L, 469K, Mechanical Engineering 320, 353, Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 320, and Zoology 352.

  10. At least eighteen semester hours in the biological sciences, including at least three hours of upper-division coursework. These eighteen hours must include at least one course in each of the following areas:
    1. Genetics: Microbiology 366 or Zoology 325, and Zoology 362.
    2. Cellular and developmental biology: Biology 303, Botany 323K or Zoology 320, Botany 331, Microbiology 226, 227, 330, Microbiology 360 or Zoology 328K, Microbiology 362, Zoology 321, and 322K.
    3. Physiology: Botany 328, Zoology 351, 361K, 365L or 371L, and 365N.
  11. At least forty-two semester hours of chemistry, including the following courses:
    1. General chemistry: Chemistry 301, 302, and either 204 or 317.
    2. Organic chemistry: Chemistry 618A, 118K, 618B, and 118L; or 610A, 610B, and 210C.
    3. Biochemistry: Chemistry 339K, 339L, 369L, and 370.
    4. Physical chemistry: Chemistry 353 and 153K.
    5. Analytical chemistry: Chemistry 455.
    6. At least three hours in upper-division laboratory courses: Chemistry 431, 369K, or 376K.
    7. One of the following courses: Chemistry 431, 354, 367L, 375K, and 475K.

  12. At least thirty-six semester hours of upper-division coursework.

  13. At least eighteen semester hours of upper-division coursework, including at least twelve semester hours of upper-division coursework in chemistry, must be completed in residence at the University.

  14. Enough additional coursework to make a total of 132 semester hours.

Special Requirements

The student must fulfill the University-wide graduation requirements given in chapter 1 and the college requirements given in this chapter. He or she must also make a grade of at least C in each course in chemistry taken at the University and used to fulfill requirement 11 of the prescribed work above.

Order and Choice of Work

The student must consult the undergraduate adviser each semester regarding order and choice of work.

Bachelor of Science in Biology

Many current areas in the study of biological systems require broadly based training that transcends the classical boundaries of biology. A student interested in specializing in one of these interdisciplinary areas should take courses in both biology and in sciences that complement biology. The Bachelor of Science in Biology degree program offers three areas of specialization: molecular biology; ecology, evolution, and conservation biology; and a teaching option. For a molecular biology concentration a strong background in chemistry, physics, mathematics, and, often, computer sciences is recommended. The program leading to the Bachelor of Science in Biology is based on that for the Bachelor of Arts but allows the student to take more hours in science in a more broadly based program of study and gives additional direction to the student in pursuit of these studies. The Bachelor of Science in Biology is intended primarily for students who plan to continue with graduate work in biology or a related area or to enter the teaching profession.

Option I: Molecular Biology

Prescribed Work

  1. English 306 and 316K. In addition, in taking courses to fulfill other degree requirements, the student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component; one of these courses must be upper-division. If the writing requirement is not fulfilled by courses specified for the degree, the student must fulfill it either with electives or with coursework taken in addition to the number of hours required for the degree. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.
  2. Proficiency in a single foreign language equivalent to that shown by completion of three semesters of college coursework. For students who enter the University with fewer than two high school units in a single foreign language, the first two semesters in a language may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree.
  3. Six semester hours of American government, including Texas government.
  4. Six semester hours of American history.
  5. Three semester hours in anthropology, economics, geography, linguistics, psychology, or sociology.
  6. Mathematics 408C and 408D. Algebra courses at the level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics 301 or 304E without degree credit to remove their deficiency.
  7. Three semester hours in architecture, art (including art history, design, studio art, visual art studies), classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts, music (including music, instruments, ensemble), philosophy (excluding courses in logic), or theatre and dance.
  8. Chemistry 301, 302, 204 or 317, and either 610A, 610B, and 210C, or 618A, 118K, 618B, and 118L.
  9. Six semester hours of physical chemistry chosen from Chemistry 353, 354, 354L, and 370.
  10. Physics 301, 101L, 316, and 116L; Physics 303K, 103M, 303L, and 103N; or Physics 317K, 117M, 317L, and 117N.
  11. Thirty-eight semester hours of coursework, consisting of (a) Biology 302, 303, and 304; (b) Microbiology 226, 227 or 228, and 129K; (c) Botany 323K or Zoology 320; (d) Zoology 321; (e) Zoology 322K; (f) Botany 331, Microbiology 368, or Chemistry 370; (g) Zoology 325; (h) Botany 367K, Microbiology 366, or Zoology 362; (i) Chemistry 339K; (j) Chemistry 339L or Microbiology 362.
  12. Two additional courses, one of which must include substantial laboratory work, chosen from the following: Biology 331* or Botany 331,* Botany 323L,* 328 and 128K,* 343M, 350M, Botany 370M or Zoology 370K, Botany 372K, Chemistry 369L, 370, Microbiology 330 and 130K, 331, 335, 342, 360 and 160K, 366, 368,* Zoology 328K, 351, 362, and 373. Courses marked with an asterisk are lecture courses that require concurrent enrollment in a laboratory course or courses that contain substantial laboratory work. Students may count three semester hours of special studies research courses in a molecular biology laboratory (Botany 377, Microbiology 379, Zoology 371K, or Chemistry 369K) toward this requirement.
  13. Of the courses chosen to fulfill requirements 11 and 12, at least one course must be taken in residence in each of the departments in the Division of Biological Sciences (botany, microbiology, and zoology).
  14. Thirty-six semester hours of upper-division coursework, of which at least eighteen hours must be in the biological sciences.
  15. At least eighteen semester hours of upper-division coursework, including at least twelve hours of upper-division coursework in biological sciences, must be completed in residence at the University.
  16. Enough additional coursework to make a total of 130 semester hours.

Special Requirements

The student must fulfill the University-wide graduation requirements given in chapter 1 and the college requirements given in this chapter. He or she must also make a grade of at least C in each course used to fulfill requirements 11 and 12 of the prescribed work above.

Option II: Ecology, Evolution, and Conservation Biology

Prescribed Work

  1. English 306 and 316K. In addition, in taking courses to fulfill other degree requirements, the student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component; one of these courses must be upper-division. If the writing requirement is not fulfilled by courses specified for the degree, the student must fulfill it either with electives or with coursework taken in addition to the number of hours required for the degree. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.
  2. Proficiency in a foreign language equivalent to that shown by the completion of three semesters of college coursework. Spanish or another language useful for fieldwork is recommended. For students who enter the University with fewer than two high school units in a single foreign language, the first two semesters in a language may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree.
  3. Six semester hours of American government, including Texas government.
  4. Six semester hours of American history.
  5. Six semester hours in anthropology, economics, geography, psychology, or sociology chosen from the following courses: Anthropology 301, 302, 318L, Economics 302, 303, Geography 301C, 301K, 308, 312, 322, 326K, 328C, 331K, 334, 334C, 334K, 335C, 335K, 339, 339K, 342C, 346, 350L, 351, 356, 357, 360G, 360L, 362K, 366K, 367K, 372K, Psychology 301, 317, Sociology 302, 317L, 319, 369K.
  6. Three semester hours in architecture, art (including art history, design, studio art, visual art studies), classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts, music (including music, instruments, ensemble), philosophy (excluding courses in logic), or theatre and dance.
  7. Mathematics 408C and 408D. Algebra courses at the level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics 301 or 304E without degree credit to remove their deficiency.
  8. Physics 317K, 317L, 117M, and 117N; or another eight-semester-hour sequence of physics courses for which credit or registration for Mathematics 408D is a prerequisite; or six semester hours in mathematics courses for which credit or registration for Mathematics 408D is a prerequisite.
  9. Chemistry 301, 302, and 204.
  10. Chemistry 610A, 610B, and 210C; or six to eight semester hours chosen from the following courses:
    1. Mathematics 316.
    2. Mathematics courses for which Mathematics 408D is a prerequisite.
    3. Physics 315 and 115L, and upper-division physics courses other than Physics 341.
    4. Upper-division chemistry courses.
    5. Computer sciences courses. Only one introductory computer language course may be counted toward requirement 10.
    6. Geology 401 or 303 or 312K, and other geology courses that may be counted toward a major in geology.
    7. Civil Engineering 311S, 341, 345, 346K, 369L, and 370K.

    The courses used to fulfill requirements 7, 8, 9, and 10 must provide at least thirty semester hours of credit.

  11. Biology 302, 303, 304, 208, and Zoology 325.
  12. At least one course or sequence of courses chosen from each of the following areas:
    1. Ecology: Botany 373K, Marine Science 440, 352C, Microbiology 363, Zoology 440, 357, and 369.
    2. Evolution: Botany 370M and Zoology 370K.
    3. Upper-division courses in applied ecology, such as Botany 375C, Marine Science 354Q, and Zoology 370C (Topic 2: Conservation Biology).
    4. Biological diversity: Botany 321 and 121C, 327 and 127K, 362, Marine Science 352D, 354, 354C, 354E, Microbiology 321, Zoology 432, 333, 436, 346, and 453.
    5. Cellular/molecular biology: Microbiology 226, 227, and 129K, 330 and 130K, 331, 335, 342, 360 and 160K, 362, Botany 323K, 323L, 331, 343M, 350M, 372K, Chemistry 339K, Zoology 320, 322K, 328K, 351, and 362.
    6. Physiology, developmental biology, and anatomy: Botany 320 and 120C, 328 and 128K, 374 and 174K, Marine Science 354S, Zoology 321, 361K, and 365L and 365N.
    7. An additional course chosen from items a through d; or an advanced evolution course chosen from Botany 352, 362L, 365M, and 370N; or an animal behavior course chosen from Zoology 354 and 370C (Topic: Behavioral Ecology).
  13. An upper-division field course or equivalent experience is required. The student may satisfy this requirement by taking a field course; by taking two upper-division biology courses with substantial field components; or by completing an appropriate, supervised research project, an appropriate internship, or an equivalent experience designed by the student and approved by the academic adviser.
  14. At least thirty-six semester hours of upper-division coursework, of which at least eighteen must be in biological sciences.
  15. Of the courses used to fulfill requirement 12, at least one must be taken in residence in each of the departments of the Division of Biological Sciences. Special studies research courses in botany, microbiology, and zoology may not be counted as the only course in residence in a department.
  16. At least three organized courses in addition to Biology 208 must contain a substantial laboratory or field component.
  17. Enough additional coursework to make a total of 130 semester hours.

Special Requirements

The student must fulfill the University-wide graduation requirements given in chapter 1 and the college requirements given in this chapter. He or she must also earn a grade of at least C in each course used to fulfill requirements 11 and 12 of the prescribed work above.

Option III: Teaching[1]

This program is designed to fulfill the course requirements for certification as a secondary school teacher in Texas, but completion of the program does not guarantee the student's certification. For information about additional certification requirements, see chapter 5 of this catalog and consult the University's teacher certification officer in the College of Education.

Sequence A: Composite Teaching Field: Science

Completion of this program usually requires 126 to 149 semester hours of coursework.

Prescribed Work
  1. English 306, 316K, and three additional semester hours in English; English 309K or 309L is recommended. In addition, in taking courses to fulfill other degree requirements, the student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component; one of these courses must be upper-division. The additional required course(s) in English may be counted toward this requirement if certified to contain a substantial writing component. If the writing requirement is not fulfilled by courses specified for the degree, the student must fulfill it either with electives or with coursework taken in addition to the number of hours required for the degree. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.
  2. Proficiency in a single foreign language equivalent to that shown by completion of courses 506, 507, and either 310K or 312K. For students who enter the University with fewer than two high school units in a single foreign language, the first two semesters in a language may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree.
  3. Six semester hours of American government, including Texas government.
  4. Six semester hours of American history.
  5. Three semester hours in anthropology, economics, geography, linguistics, psychology, or sociology. Psychology 301 is highly recommended.
  6. Mathematics 408C; and Mathematics 408D, 316, or Computer Sciences 304P. Algebra courses at the level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics 301 or 304E without degree credit to remove their deficiency.
  7. Three semester hours in architecture, art (including art history, design, studio art, visual art studies), classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts, music (including music, instruments, ensemble), philosophy (excluding courses in logic), or theatre and dance.
  8. Six semester hours in human development, consisting of one course from each of the following groups:
    1. Child Development 313, Educational Psychology 363M (Topic 3: Adolescent Development), Psychology 304, 309, 333D, or 339.
    2. Applied Learning and Development 322 or Psychology 345.
  9. Eighteen semester hours in education: Curriculum and Instruction 331C, 332S, 364, 667S (Student Teaching in Secondary Schools: Science), and 370S (Topic 2: Science).
  10. Documented evidence of proficiency in oral communication. Proficiency is assessed in Curriculum and Instruction 332S. Students who lack proficiency must take Speech 305, 319, Theatre and Dance 303, 303C, or 326.
  11. Documented evidence of proficiency in computing or credit for three semester hours in computer sciences, data processing, management information systems, or coursework intended to provide computer literacy. This requirement is fulfilled by completion of Biology 208.
  12. Biology 302, 303, 304, and one laboratory course chosen from Biology 205, 206, and 208.[2]
  13. The following courses:
    1. Microbiology 226, 227 or 228, and 129K.
    2. Botany 323K or Zoology 320.
    3. Zoology 325.
    4. One of the following: Botany 328, Marine Science 354S, Microbiology 362, Zoology 321, 361K, or both Zoology 365L and 365N.
    5. Botany 321 and 121C, or 320 and 120C.
    6. One of the following: Botany 373K, Marine Science 352C, 353 (Topic 6: Marine Ecology), 354E, Microbiology 363, Zoology 357, 369.
    7. An additional upper-division course in botany, microbiology, or zoology that includes a laboratory, or an upper-division course in one of these fields and a freshman-level laboratory course in biology.
  14. Chemistry 301, 302, 204, 610A, 610B, and 210C.
  15. Physics 302K, 102M, 302L, and 102N; or any eight-semester-hour calculus-based physics sequence.
  16. Six semester hours of approved coursework in geology.
Special Requirements
The student must fulfill the University-wide graduation requirements given in chapter 1 and the college requirements given in this chapter. He or she must also make a grade of at least C in each course used to fulfill requirements 13 through 16 of the prescribed work above. For additional teacher certification requirements, see chapter 5 of this catalog and consult the University's teacher certification officer in the College of Education.

Sequence B: Two Teaching Fields: Biology and Chemistry

Completion of this program usually requires 124 to 148 semester hours of coursework.

Prescribed Work
  1. English 306, 316K, and three additional semester hours in English; English 309K or 309L is recommended. In addition, in taking courses to fulfill other degree requirements, the student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component; one of these courses must be upper-division. The additional required course(s) in English may be counted toward this requirement if certified to contain a substantial writing component. If the writing requirement is not fulfilled by courses specified for the degree, the student must fulfill it either with electives or with coursework taken in addition to the number of hours required for the degree. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.
  2. Proficiency in a single foreign language equivalent to that shown by completion of courses 506, 507, and either 310K or 312K. For students who enter the University with fewer than two high school units in a single foreign language, the first two semesters in a language may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree.
  3. Six semester hours of American government, including Texas government.
  4. Six semester hours of American history.
  5. Three semester hours in anthropology, economics, geography, linguistics, psychology, or sociology. Psychology 301 is highly recommended.
  6. Mathematics 408C; and Mathematics 408D, 316, or Computer Sciences 304P. Algebra courses at the level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics 301 or 304E without degree credit to remove their deficiency.
  7. Three semester hours in architecture, art (including art history, design, studio art, visual art studies), classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts, music (including music, instruments, ensemble), philosophy (excluding courses in logic), or theatre and dance.
  8. Six semester hours in human development, consisting of one course from each of the following groups:
    1. Child Development 313, Educational Psychology 363M (Topic 3: Adolescent Development), Psychology 304, 309, 333D, or 339.
    2. Applied Learning and Development 322 or Psychology 345.
  9. Eighteen semester hours in education: Curriculum and Instruction 331C, 332S, 364, 667S (Student Teaching in Secondary Schools: Science), and 370S (Topic 2: Science).
  10. Documented evidence of proficiency in oral communication. Proficiency is assessed in Curriculum and Instruction 332S. Students who lack proficiency must take Speech 305, 319, or Theatre and Dance 303, 303C, or 326.
  11. Documented evidence of proficiency in computing or credit for three semester hours in computer sciences, data processing, management information systems, or coursework intended to provide computer literacy. This requirement is fulfilled by completion of Biology 208.
  12. Biology 302, 303, 304, and one laboratory course chosen from Biology 205, 206, and 208.[2]
  13. The following courses:
    1. Microbiology 226, 227 or 228, and 129K.
    2. Botany 323K or Zoology 320.
    3. Zoology 325.
    4. One of the following: Botany 328, Marine Science 354S, Microbiology 362, Zoology 321, 361K, or both Zoology 365L and 365N.
    5. Botany 321 and 121C, or 320 and 120C.
    6. One of the following: Botany 373K, Marine Science 352C, 353 (Topic 6: Marine Ecology), 354E, Microbiology 363, Zoology 357, 369.
    7. An additional upper-division course in botany, microbiology, or zoology that includes a laboratory, or an upper-division course in one of these fields and a freshman-level laboratory course in biology.
  14. Chemistry 301, 302, 204, 610A, 610B, 210C, and twelve semester hours chosen from Chemistry 339K, 339L, 341, 353, 153K, 455, 367L, and 370.
Special Requirements
The student must fulfill the University-wide graduation requirements given in chapter 1 and the college requirements given in this chapter. He or she must also make a grade of at least C in each course used to fulfill requirements 13 and 14 of the prescribed work above. For additional teacher certification requirements, see chapter 5 of this catalog and consult the University's teacher certification officer in the College of Education.

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