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Bachelor of Science in Geosystems Engineering and Hydrogeology[1]

Geosystems engineers and hydrogeologists are concerned with the development and use of engineering approaches in the management of natural resources from the earth's surface and subsurface, environmental restoration of subsurface sites, and other processes related to the earth sciences. This degree program, offered jointly by the College of Engineering and the College of Natural Sciences, is designed to teach students the geological and engineering principles needed to solve subsurface resource development and environmental problems. The curriculum includes a fundamental sequence of engineering and geological sciences courses in such areas as multiphase fluid flow, physical and chemical hydrology, heat and mass transfer, field methods, and engineering design. This interdisciplinary systems approach, combining engineering, geology, and geophysics, is increasingly required to address complex real-world problems such as characterization and remediation of aquifers. Graduates are well-prepared to seek employment with environmental, water resource management, energy, and mining companies in addition to many government agencies.

Curriculum

Course requirements are divided into three categories: basic sequence courses, major sequence courses, and other required courses. Enrollment in major sequence courses is restricted to students who have received credit for all of the basic sequence courses and have been admitted to the major sequence by the College of Engineering Admissions Committee. (Requirements for admission to a major sequence are given on chapter 6.) Enrollment in other required courses is not restricted by completion of the basic sequence.

Courses used to fulfill technical and nontechnical elective requirements must be approved by the petroleum and geosystems engineering faculty and the geological sciences faculty before the student enrolls in them. Courses that fulfill the social science and fine arts/humanities requirements are listed in chapter 6.

Students must fulfill the foreign language requirement given in chapter 6. They must also remove any admission deficiencies in mathematics as described in General Information.

Courses Semester Hours

Basic Sequence Courses
Chemistry 301, 302, Civil Engineering 319F, Engineering Mechanics 306S, English 306, 316K, Geology 312K, 416K, 416M, 420K, Mathematics 408C, 408D, 427K, Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 310, 312, Physics 303K, 303L, 103M, 103N 59

Major Sequence Courses
Geology 428, 468K, 476K, 376L, 376M, 376S, Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 421K, 322K, 424, 326, 331, 333T, 337, 365, 368, 373K, 373L 56
Approved environmental engineering technical elective 3

Other Required Courses
American government, including Texas government 6
American history 6
Approved fine arts or humanities elective 3
Approved social science elective 3

Minimum Required 136

Suggested Arrangement of Courses

First Year -- Fall Semester

Courses Semester Hours

CH 301, Principles of Chemistry I 3
E 306, Rhetoric and Composition 3
GEO 312K, Geology of Engineering 3
M 408C, Differential and Integral Calculus 4
Approved social science elective 3
Total 16
First Year -- Spring Semester

Courses Semester Hours

CH 302, Principles of Chemistry II 3
GEO 416M, Sedimentary Rocks 4
M 408D, Sequences, Series, and Multivariable Calculus 4
PHY 303K, Engineering Physics I 3
PHY 103M, Laboratory for Physics 303K 1
American government 3
Total 18
Second Year -- Fall Semester

Courses Semester Hours

E M 306S, Statics and Dynamics 3
GEO 416K, Earth Materials 4
M 427K, Advanced Calculus for
Applications I
4
PGE 310, Formulation and Solution of Geosystems Engineering Problems 3
PHY 303L, Engineering Physics II 3
PHY 103N, Laboratory for Physics 303L 1
Total 18
Second Year -- Spring Semester

Courses Semester Hours

C E 319F, Elementary Mechanics of Fluids 3
GEO 420K, Introduction to Field and Stratigraphic Methods 4
PGE 312, Physical and Chemical Behavior of Fluids I 3
PGE 333T, Technical Communication 3
American government 3
Total 16
Third Year -- Fall Semester

Courses Semester Hours

GEO 428, Structural Geology 4
GEO 476K, Groundwater Hydrology 4
PGE 322K, Transport Phenomena in Geosystems 3
PGE 424, Petrophysics 4
PGE 326, Thermodynamics and Phase Behavior 3
Total 18
Third Year -- Spring Semester

Courses Semester Hours

E 316K, Masterworks of Literature 3
PGE 421K, Physical and Chemical Behavior of Fluids II 4
PGE 337, Introduction to Geostatistics 3
PGE 365, Resource Economics and Valuation 3
American history 3
Total 16
Third Year -- Summer Session

Courses Semester Hours

GEO 376L, Field Methods in Groundwater Hydrology 3
Fourth Year -- Fall Semester

Courses Semester Hours

GEO 376S, Physical Hydrology 3
PGE 331, Fundamentals of Reservoir Engineering 3
PGE 368, Fundamentals of Well Logging 3
PGE 373K, Geosystems Engineering Design and Analysis I 3
Approved environmental engineering technical elective 3
Total 15
Fourth Year -- Spring Semester

Courses Semester Hours

GEO 468K, Geophysics for Geology Majors 4
GEO 376M, Chemical Hydrogeology 3
PGE 373L, Geosystems Engineering Design and Analysis II 3
American history 3
Approved fine arts/humanities elective 3
Total 16

Bachelor of Science in Interior Design

A professional major in interior design combines broad general education with specific interior design education. The curriculum incorporates knowledge, skills, and learning experiences to prepare graduates for careers concerned with solving the functional and aesthetic problems in the design of living and working environments. The program meets the standards for accreditation of the Foundation for Interior Design Education Research.

The student may be prepared for a career as an interior designer in a design studio, furniture store, or department store, or as a member of a design team with architectural firms, contract designers, builders, and developers. With appropriate selection of electives or additional courses in other areas, the student may qualify for positions in merchandising, historic preservation, or writing for home furnishings publications.

Prescribed Work

  1. English 306 and 316K. In addition, in taking courses to fulfill other degree requirements, the student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component; one of these courses must be upper-division. If the writing requirement is not fulfilled by courses specified for the degree, the student must fulfill it either with electives or with coursework taken in addition to the number of hours required for the degree. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.
  2. Students who enter the University with fewer than two high school units in a single foreign language must take the first two semesters in a language without degree credit to remove their language deficiency.
  3. Six semester hours of American government, including Texas government; six semester hours of American history; and six semester hours of economics, psychology, and/or sociology.
  4. Three semester hours of mathematics other than Mathematics 301, 302, 316K, and 316L. Algebra courses at the level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics 301 or 304E without degree credit to remove their deficiency.
  5. Chemistry 313N; six semester hours of biological science; and three additional semester hours of chemistry, physics, or physical science.
  6. Mechanical Engineering 208G.
  7. Speech 305 or 319 and three semester hours of advertising, legal environment of business, or marketing.
  8. Twelve semester hours in one of the following sequences: (a) architecture sequence: Architecture 310K, 310L, 311K, 311L; (b) art sequence: Studio Art 301K or 320K (Topic: Basic Drawing Skills), 302K, 302L, and one of the following: Studio Art 310K, 311K, 313K, 314K, 317K, 320K (Topic: Textile Surface Design). In addition, three semester hours of upper-division coursework, approved by the adviser, in art history and/or architectural history.
  9. Fifty-one semester hours in the Department of Human Ecology, consisting of Interior Design 201R, 101S, 202R, 102S, 213R, 313S, 214R, 314S, 335F, 336F, 236R, 136S, 237R, 137S, 245R, 345S, 346R, 346S, 357S, 358S, Textiles and Apparel 205 and 105L, and one of the following courses: Home Economics 322, 355 (Topic 2: Foundations of Human Ecology), 361, Interior Design 355, Textiles and Apparel 355N. Eighteen semester hours of this requirement must be completed in residence at the University.
  10. Thirty-six semester hours of upper-division coursework, of which at least eighteen must be within and at least twelve must be outside the Department of Human Ecology.
  11. Enough additional coursework to make a total of 126 semester hours.

Special Requirements

The student must fulfill the University-wide graduation requirements given in chapter 1 and the college requirements given in this chapter. He or she must also make a grade of at least C in each course used to fulfill requirements 6, 8, and 9 of the prescribed work above. A University grade point average of at least 2.50 is a prerequisite for Interior Design 213R, 313S, 214R, 314S, 236R, 136S, 237R, 137S, 245R, 345S, 346R, 346S, 357S, and 358S.

Portfolio requirement. All students must obtain written authorization from the undergraduate adviser in interior design to enroll in Interior Design 245R and 345S. The student obtains authorization by submitting to the portfolio review committee a satisfactory portfolio of selected work he or she has completed in previous courses, such as Interior Design 201R, 101S, 202R, 102S, 213R, 313S, Mechanical Engineering 208G, and art or architecture sequence courses. In addition, students may include any supplementary material that they feel will provide useful information to the reviewing committee in evaluating their progress. Portfolios may be submitted for review during the first week of the fall semester and the first week of the spring semester.

The reviewing committee, at its discretion, determines that the student will advance with distinction; advance; advance and retake certain courses with specified faculty members in order to eliminate weaknesses; or complete additional coursework and undergo another review.

Order and Choice of Work

The student must consult the faculty adviser each semester regarding order and choice of work.

Bachelor of Science in Mathematics

As an alternative to the Bachelor of Arts degree, the Bachelor of Science in Mathematics is designed with a twofold purpose: to offer students a more extensive scientific program that may better prepare them for graduate study or employment, and to recognize students who choose to pursue a more demanding program. Students are given the opportunity to develop greater breadth and depth in their mathematical programs as well as to combine mathematics with a concentration in another scientific discipline.

To accomplish this, both the minimum number of semester hours of mathematics required and the maximum allowed are increased by nine hours. Specialization in one additional scientific area is encouraged, and the foreign language requirement is shortened by one semester.

Prescribed Work

  1. English 306 and 316K. In addition, in taking courses to fulfill other degree requirements, the student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component; one of these courses must be upper-division. If the writing requirement is not fulfilled by courses specified for the degree, the student must fulfill it either with electives or with coursework taken in addition to the number of hours required for the degree. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.
  2. Courses 506 and 507 (or the equivalent) in a single foreign language, and a three-semester-hour course in the same language for which 507 is a prerequisite; or as much of this coursework as required by the student's score on the appropriate language placement test. For students who enter the University with fewer than two high school units in a single foreign language, the first two semesters in a language may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree.
  3. Six semester hours of American history.
  4. Six semester hours of American government, including Texas government.
  5. Three semester hours in anthropology, economics, geography, linguistics, psychology, or sociology.
  6. Eight semester hours chosen from one of the following areas: astronomy, biology, botany, chemistry, geology, microbiology and biology, physics, and zoology and biology.
  7. Computer Sciences 304P or the equivalent.
  8. Six semester hours in architecture, classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts (including art history, design, ensemble, fine arts, instruments, music, studio art, theatre and dance, visual art studies), philosophy, or programs of special concentration. Three of these six semester hours must be taken in architecture, classics, fine arts, or philosophy (excluding courses in logic).
  9. No fewer than forty-one but no more than forty-five semester hours of mathematics, including Mathematics 408C and 408D, or the equivalent, 311, either 325K or 328K, 427K, 362K, 365C, 373K, and at least nine additional semester hours of upper-division mathematics. A grade of at least C is required in all mathematics courses. Mathematics 301, 304E, 305G, and equivalent courses may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics 301 or 304E without degree credit to remove their deficiency.
  10. Forty-two semester hours of upper-division coursework. At least six hours of upper-division coursework must be outside both mathematics and the subject areas listed in requirement 6.
  11. Eighteen semester hours in mathematics must be completed in residence at the University.
  12. Enough additional coursework to make a total of 126 semester hours.

Special Requirements

The student must fulfill the University-wide graduation requirements given in chapter 1 and the college requirements given in this chapter. He or she must also make a grade of at least C in each semester of each course in mathematics taken at the University and used to fulfill requirement 9 of the prescribed work above.

Order and Choice of Work

The following is recommended as a typical program; it assumes that the student has the prerequisites for Mathematics 408C. Certain approved courses offered in the College of Business Administration may be substituted for economics. The science requirement may be fulfilled by approved courses in the College of Engineering. Additional courses that may be of interest to mathematics majors are offered by various departments in these colleges.

First year: Mathematics 408C and 408D; English 306; courses 506 and 507 (or the equivalent) in a single foreign language; three semester hours to fulfill requirement 5 of the prescribed work above; three semester hours to be counted toward requirement 8 of the prescribed work above; six semester hours of electives.

Second year: Mathematics 311, either 325K or 328K, and 427K; English 316K; three semester hours in a foreign language for which course 507 is prerequisite; six semester hours of American history; Computer Sciences 304P; six semester hours of electives.

Third year: Mathematics 362K, 365C, and six additional semester hours of mathematics, including at least three hours of upper-division coursework; eight semester hours of science to fulfill requirement 6 of the prescribed work above; six semester hours of American government; a three-semester-hour elective to fulfill requirement 1 of the prescribed work above; three semester hours of upper-division electives.

Fourth year: Mathematics 373K and nine additional semester hours of mathematics, including at least six hours of upper-division coursework; three semester hours to be counted toward requirement 8 of the prescribed work above; six semester hours of upper-division nonscience electives; six additional semester hours of upper-division electives; five additional semester hours of electives.

Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology

This program is designed to enable the student preparing for a career in medical technology both to earn the bachelor's degree in four years and to complete the technical training required for certification by the Registry of Medical Technologists. The purpose of this degree program is to meet the increasing demands of the medical sciences for technologists with a higher level of science background and a greater degree of technical competence than can be attained by satisfying only the minimum registry requirements.

Prescribed Work

  1. English 306 and 316K. In addition, in taking courses to fulfill other degree requirements, the student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component; one of these courses must be upper-division. If the writing requirement is not fulfilled by courses specified for the degree, the student must fulfill it either with electives or with coursework taken in addition to the number of hours required for the degree. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.
  2. Courses 506 and 507 (or the equivalent) in a single foreign language, or as much of this coursework as required by the student's score on the appropriate language placement test. For students who enter the University with fewer than two high school units in a single foreign language, the first two semesters in a language may not be counted toward the one hundred semester hours of academic work specified in requirement 13 below.
  3. Six semester hours of American government, including Texas government.
  4. Six semester hours of American history.
  5. Three semester hours chosen from the following: Psychology 301 (recommended), Anthropology 302, economics, or sociology.
  6. Mathematics 305G or 408C. Algebra courses at the level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics 301 or 304E without degree credit to remove their deficiency.
  7. Three semester hours in architecture, art (including art history, design, studio art, visual art studies), classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts, music (including music, instruments, ensemble), philosophy (excluding courses in logic), or theatre and dance.
  8. Biology 302 and 303, or the equivalent.
  9. Chemistry 301; 302; 204; either 610A, 610B, and 210C, or 618A, 118K, 618B, and 118L; 339K; and 455.
  10. Microbiology 226, 227, 228, 129K, 360, 160K, 361K, and either 321 322, or 330.
  11. Eight semester hours of physics in one of the following sequences: Physics 317K, 317L, 117M, and 117N; or 302K, 302L, 102M, and 102N; or 301, 101L, 316, and 116L; or 303K, 303L, 103M, and 103N.
  12. Zoology 316K, 116L, 325, and three additional semester hours of upper-division biological science.
  13. Enough additional elective coursework if necessary to make a total of at least one hundred semester hours of academic work completed before the fourth-year training program.
  14. The completion of twelve months of training in a school of medical technology accredited by the Board of Schools of the American Medical Association and the American Society for Clinical Pathology. Upon completion of this work the student must submit a transcript showing grades in all courses in the school of medical technology to the Office of the Dean, College of Natural Sciences, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712-1199. To be counted toward the degree the coursework must be evaluated by the faculty adviser in the Department of Microbiology and approved by the dean. None of the work prescribed for the fourth year of this curriculum may be used to fulfill the residence requirement.

Special Requirements

The student must fulfill the University-wide graduation requirements given in chapter 1 and the college requirements given in this chapter. He or she must also make a grade of at least C in each course used to fulfill requirements 10 and 12 of the prescribed work above.

Order and Choice of Work

The student should consult the faculty adviser each semester regarding order and choice of work and balancing the laboratory load. Students should complete the requirements both for general chemistry (Chemistry 301, 302, and 204) and for biology (Biology 302, followed by 303) during the first year, since these courses are prerequisites for courses required in the second year. Organic chemistry (Chemistry 610A, 610B, and 210C; or 618A, 118K, 618B, and 118L) should be completed as soon thereafter as possible since it is prerequisite for Chemistry 339K.

Bachelor of Science in Microbiology

The Bachelor of Science in Microbiology degree program is intended to prepare students for eventual professional careers as microbiologists, either upon graduation or after graduate study in the subdisciplines of microbiology or in related fields. In addition, it may serve as the basis for a career in many areas outside basic microbiology, such as pharmacology; medicine and health-related fields; agricultural, marine, and environmental science; and biotechnology.

The Bachelor of Science in Microbiology degree program allows the student to take more semester hours in science in a more intensive course of study than does the Bachelor of Arts degree program. The Bachelor of Science in Microbiology degree is intended primarily for students who have made a commitment to pursue a career in microbiology or a related area. The program is broad based, encompasses all the major specialties within microbiology, and emphasizes laboratory experience. Supporting work in biology, chemistry, physics, and zoology is an integral part of this program.

Prescribed Work

  1. English 306 and 316K. In addition, in taking courses to fulfill other degree requirements, the student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component; one of these courses must be upper-division. If the writing requirement is not fulfilled by courses specified for the degree, the student must fulfill it either with electives or with coursework taken in addition to the number of hours required for the degree. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.
  2. French, German, Spanish, or Russian 506 and 507 and a three-semester-hour course in the same language for which 507 is a prerequisite; or as much of this coursework as required by the student's score on the appropriate language placement test. For students who enter the University with fewer than two high school units in a single foreign language, the first two courses may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree.
  3. Six semester hours of American history.
  4. Six semester hours of American government, including Texas government.
  5. Three semester hours in psychology, anthropology, economics, sociology, geography, or linguistics.
  6. Mathematics 408C and 408D. Algebra courses at the level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics 301 or 304E without degree credit to remove their deficiency.
  7. Three semester hours, preferably upper-division, in architecture, art (including art history, design, studio art, visual art studies), classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts, music (including music, instruments, ensemble), philosophy (excluding courses in logic), or theatre and dance.
  8. Chemistry 301; 302; 204; either 610A, 610B, and 210C, or 618A, 118K, 618B, and 118L; and 339K. Physical chemistry (Chemistry 353 and 153K) is recommended for students interested in certain areas of specialization; departmental advisers should be consulted.
  9. Eight semester hours of physics in one of the following sequences: Physics 302K, 302L, 102M, 102N; 317K, 317L, 117M, 117N; or 301, 101L, 316, 116L. The last sequence is the prerequisite for Chemistry 353 and is recommended for students interested in graduate study.
  10. Biology 302 and 303.
  11. Zoology 325.
  12. Microbiology 321 or both 322 and 122K, 226, 227, 228, 129K, 330, 130K, 360, 160K, 362, 366, and nine additional semester hours of upper-division coursework. At least three of these nine semester hours must be in a laboratory course.
  13. At least forty-two of the 130 semester hours required for the degree must be in upper-division courses.
  14. At least eighteen semester hours of upper-division coursework, including at least twelve semester hours of microbiology, must be completed in residence at the University.
  15. Elective coursework to make a total of at least 130 semester hours. Departmental advisers will assist students in the choice of electives. In general, it is recommended that students take at least three semester hours of computer sciences (six hours are more desirable) and additional microbiology courses as part of these elective hours.

Special Requirements

The student must fulfill the University-wide graduation requirements given in chapter 1 and the college requirements given in this chapter. He or she must also make a grade of at least C in each course in a biological science taken at the University and used to fulfill requirements 10, 11, and 12 of the prescribed work above.

Order and Choice of Work

The student should consult the faculty adviser for the Bachelor of Science in Microbiology program each semester regarding course load and balance between laboratory and nonlaboratory work.

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