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Bachelor of Science in Nutrition

Option I: Nutrition

Sequences A and B in nutrition emphasize the science of nutrition and its application to the field of dietetics. They seek to develop in students an awareness of the economic, social, cultural, and psychological aspects of food and food habits as well as the scientific and managerial principles important in the provision of nutritional care.

Sequence A

This sequence is currently approved as a Didactic Program in Dietetics (DPD) by the American Dietetic Association (ADA) Council on Education Division of Education and Approval, a specialized accrediting body recognized by the Council on Postsecondary Accreditation and the United States Department of Education. Students who fulfill the requirements established by the ADA while completing sequence A will receive a DPD Verification Statement that allows them to apply for ADA-accredited dietetic internships or approved preprofessional practice programs. These requirements are a grade point average of at least 3.00 in nutrition and completion in residence of at least four upper-division nutrition courses and any accompanying laboratory courses.

By completing a dietetic internship or approved preprofessional practice program, the graduate of this degree program may qualify to become a member of the ADA and to write the qualifying examination to become a registered dietician. Dietitians provide expertise in nutrition and foodservice management in a variety of settings, including clinics, hospitals, proprietary care centers, the armed services, public and private schools, university food services, research laboratories, commercial and industrial establishments, and public and privately funded health and wellness programs at the local, state, and federal levels.

Prescribed Work
  1. English 306, 316K, and a three-semester-hour course in communications chosen from a list available in the departmental office. In addition, in taking courses to fulfill other degree requirements, the student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component; one of these courses must be upper-division. If the writing requirement is not fulfilled by courses specified for the degree, the student must fulfill it either with electives or with coursework taken in addition to the number of hours required for the degree. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.
  2. Students who enter the University with fewer than two high school units in a single foreign language must take the first two semesters in a language without degree credit to remove their language deficiency.
  3. Six semester hours of American government, including Texas government; six semester hours of American history; Economics 302 or 303; Psychology 301; and Sociology 302 or Anthropology 302.
  4. Three semester hours of computer sciences or statistics chosen from Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Educational Psychology 371, Management Information Systems 310, Mathematics 316, and Computer Sciences 304P; and Mathematics 303D, 403K, 305G, or 408C. Algebra courses at the level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics 301 or 304E without degree credit to remove their deficiency.
  5. Chemistry 313N, 113P, and either 314N and 114P or 339K; Biology 302; Zoology 316K; and Microbiology 228 and 129K.
  6. Three semester hours in architecture, art (including art history, design, studio art, visual art studies), classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts, music (including music, instruments, ensemble), philosophy (excluding courses in logic), or theatre and dance.
  7. Applied Learning and Development 320.
  8. Accounting 310F or 311, and Management 336.
  9. No fewer than forty-one but no more than forty-eight semester hours in the Department of Human Ecology, including Child Development 313, Home Economics 322, Nutrition 307, 107L, 311, 111L, 332, 334, 234L, 342, 142L, 344, 144M, 355M, 370, 170L, and one of the following: Nutrition 324 and 124L, 338W, 355, or 359H and 379H. With approval of the chairman, six of these hours may be chosen from related areas outside the Department of Human Ecology. Eighteen semester hours of this requirement must be completed in residence at the University.
  10. Thirty-six semester hours of upper-division coursework, of which at least eighteen must be within and at least twelve must be outside the Department of Human Ecology.
  11. Enough additional coursework to make a total of 126 semester hours.
Special Requirements
The student must fulfill the University-wide graduation requirements given in chapter 1 and the college requirements given in this chapter. He or she must also make a grade of at least C in all courses used to fulfill requirement 1 and requirements 3 through 9 of the prescribed work above.

Sequence B

This sequence prepares students for graduate study in nutrition. Graduates may seek employment in private or publicly funded research programs or, upon completion of graduate study, may engage in college or university teaching or nutrition research.

With careful selection of electives, students completing sequence B may meet the academic requirements of the American Dietetic Association and, with postbaccalaureate experience, may qualify to become members of the association and to write the examination to become a registered dietitian.

Prescribed Work
  1. English 306, 316K, and a three-semester-hour course in communications chosen from a list available in the departmental office. In addition, in taking courses to fulfill other degree requirements, the student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component; one of these courses must be upper-division. If the writing requirement is not fulfilled by courses specified for the degree, the student must fulfill it either with electives or with coursework taken in addition to the number of hours required for the degree. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.
  2. Students who enter the University with fewer than two high school units in a single foreign language must take the first two semesters in a language without degree credit to remove their language deficiency.
  3. Six semester hours of American government, including Texas government; six semester hours of American history; Psychology 301; and three semester hours chosen from the following courses: Anthropology 302, Economics 302 and 303, and Sociology 302.
  4. Three semester hours of computer sciences or statistics chosen from Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Educational Psychology 371, Management Information Systems 310, Mathematics 316, and Computer Sciences 304P; and either Mathematics 403K or 305G. Algebra courses at the level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics 301 or 304E without degree credit to remove their deficiency.
  5. Three semester hours in architecture, art (including art history, design, studio art, visual art studies), classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts, music (including music, instruments, ensemble), philosophy (excluding courses in logic), or theatre and dance.
  6. Chemistry 301, 302, 204, 610A, 610B, 210C, 369L, 339K, and 339L; Biology 302 and 303; Zoology 365N; Microbiology 226, 227 or 228, and 129K; and three semester hours chosen from Zoology 325, 365L, and Microbiology 360.
  7. No fewer than thirty-nine but no more than forty-eight semester hours in the Department of Human Ecology, including Child Development 313, Home Economics 322, Nutrition 307, 107L, 311, 111L, 332, 342, 142L, 344, 144M, 370, and 170L; one of the following: Nutrition 324 and 124L, 338W, 355, or 359H and 379H; and three semester hours chosen from courses in applied art, family relationships, food systems management, housing, interior design, and textiles and apparel. Six semester hours of chemistry for which Chemistry 302 is a prerequisite may be substituted for six of the required hours in the Department of Human Ecology. Eighteen semester hours of this requirement must be completed in residence at the University.
  8. Thirty-six semester hours of upper-division coursework, of which at least eighteen must be within and at least twelve must be outside the Department of Human Ecology.
  9. Enough additional coursework to make a total of 126 semester hours.
Special Requirements
The student must fulfill the University-wide graduation requirements given in chapter 1 and the college requirements given in this chapter. He or she must also make a grade of at least C in all courses used to fulfill requirement 1 and requirements 3 through 7 of the prescribed work above.

Option II: Coordinated Program in Dietetics

This option, in which academic and professional studies are integrated, is currently accredited by the American Dietetic Association (ADA) Council on Education Division of Education and Approval, a specialized accrediting body recognized by the Council on Postsecondary Accreditation and the United States Department of Education. With both didactic instruction and about one thousand hours of coordinated supervised practice, the program is designed for students who wish to enter the profession of dietetics. Graduates of the program immediately qualify for active membership in the ADA and to write the examination to become a registered dietitian. Dietitians provide expertise in nutrition and foodservice management in a variety of settings, including clinics, hospitals, proprietary care centers, the armed services, research laboratories, commercial and industrial establishments, and public and privately funded health and wellness programs at the local, state, and federal levels.

This is a professional program with limited enrollment. Admission is subject to the approval of an admissions panel. A formal application must be filed by February 20 for entry the following fall semester. Materials and directions for application to the program are available from the Department of Human Ecology.

A student's continuation in the program may be canceled by the admissions panel if the student fails to maintain a strong academic record or fails to enroll in and proceed through the sequence of program courses scheduled upon admission.

Prescribed Work

  1. English 306, 316K, and a three-semester-hour course in communications chosen from a list available in the departmental office. In addition, in taking courses to fulfill other degree requirements, the student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component; one of these courses must be upper-division. If the writing requirement is not fulfilled by courses specified for the degree, the student must fulfill it either with electives or with coursework taken in addition to the number of hours required for the degree. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.
  2. Students who enter the University with fewer than two high school units in a single foreign language must take the first two semesters in a language without degree credit to remove their language deficiency.
  3. Six semester hours of American government, including Texas government; six semester hours of American history; Economics 302 or 303; Psychology 301; and Sociology 302 or Anthropology 302.
  4. Three semester hours of computer sciences or statistics chosen from Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Educational Psychology 371, Management Information Systems 310, Mathematics 316, and Computer Sciences 304P; and Mathematics 303D, 403K, 305G, or 408C. Algebra courses at the level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics 301 or 304E without degree credit to remove their deficiency.
  5. Three semester hours in architecture, art (including art history, design, studio art, visual art studies), classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts, music (including music, instruments, ensemble), philosophy (excluding courses in logic), or theatre and dance.
  6. Chemistry 313N and 113P, and either 314N and 114P or 339K; Biology 302; Zoology 316K; and Microbiology 228 and 129K.
  7. Applied Learning and Development 320, Nursing 310, or Educational Psychology 367.
  8. Accounting 310F or 311, Management 336, and three semester hours chosen from the following courses: Legal Environment of Business 320F, Finance 320F, Management 325, 372, Marketing 320F, and 337.
  9. Fifty-two or fifty-four semester hours in the Department of Human Ecology, consisting of Child Development 313, Nutrition 307, 107L, 311, 328C, 334, 234L, 342, 142L, 344, 144M, 145C, 352C, 355L, 668, 373, and 377K; either Nutrition 324 and 124L or 359H and 379H; and three semester hours chosen from courses in applied art, family and consumer economics, family relationships, housing, interior design, or textiles and apparel. Eighteen semester hours of this requirement must be completed in residence at the University.
  10. Thirty-six semester hours of upper-division coursework, of which at least eighteen must be within and at least twelve must be outside the Department of Human Ecology.
  11. Enough additional coursework to make a total of 126 semester hours.

Special Requirements

The student must fulfill the University-wide graduation requirements given in chapter 1 and the college requirements given in this chapter. He or she must also make a grade of at least C in all courses used to fulfill requirement 1 and requirements 3 through 9 of the prescribed work above.

Order and Choice of Work

The student should consult the faculty adviser each semester regarding order and choice of work. Prerequisites should be checked carefully. The following courses should be taken in the indicated semester: third year, fall semester: Nutrition 145C; spring semester: Nutrition 328C, 668A; fourth year, fall semester: Nutrition 355L, 668B, 373, 377K; spring semester: Nutrition 352C. Because these courses are taught only once a year, a student who does not take them at the indicated time may be unable to complete the program.

Bachelor of Science in Physics

The Bachelor of Science in Physics degree program is designed to provide the skills, understanding, and outlook required for participation in the development of new knowledge about the material universe.

The program is balanced and broad, providing the student with basic skills needed for many careers. Students who elect to end their formal training with the Bachelor of Science in Physics degree can seek employment in industry and teaching. These students may be able to help answer many of the technological questions facing our society. How to extend present technologies to meet human needs and how to help future generations understand the role of science in society are important aims of the physicist. The methods and skills that students are expected to master in the Bachelor of Science in Physics degree program, such as analysis of the mathematical model, will provide the insights and techniques necessary for versatility in many employment areas.

For students who elect graduate study, the Bachelor of Science in Physics provides a firm foundation for further training. For those who plan to teach physics in secondary school, the Bachelor of Science in Physics: Teaching Option provides the courses needed for certification.

Prescribed Work

  1. English 306 and 316K. In addition, in taking courses to fulfill other degree requirements, the student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component; one of these courses must be upper-division. If the writing requirement is not fulfilled by courses specified for the degree, the student must fulfill it either with electives or with coursework taken in addition to the number of hours required for the degree. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.
  2. Courses 506 and 507 (or the equivalent) in a foreign language approved by the undergraduate adviser, and a three-semester-hour course in the same language for which 507 or the equivalent is a prerequisite; or as much of this coursework as required by the student's score on the appropriate language placement test. For students who enter the University with fewer than two high school units in a single foreign language, the first two semesters in a language may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree.
  3. Six semester hours of American government, including Texas government.
  4. Six semester hours of American history.
  5. Three semester hours in anthropology, economics, geography, linguistics, psychology, or sociology.
  6. Chemistry 302, and 204 or 317.
  7. Three semester hours of biology and two additional hours in biology, geology, or astronomy. A course may not be used to fulfill this requirement if it cannot be counted toward major requirements in the department that offers it.
  8. Three semester hours in architecture, art (including art history, design, studio art, visual art studies), classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts, music (including music, instruments, ensemble), philosophy (excluding courses in logic), or theatre and dance.
  9. Twenty-four semester hours of mathematics at the level of Mathematics 408C and above. Courses that are prerequisites for Mathematics 408C may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. The following mathematics courses are recommended: Mathematics 408C, 408D, 427K, 427L, 340L, 361, and 362K. Algebra courses at the level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics 301 or 304E without degree credit to remove their deficiency.
  10. At least twenty-eight semester hours of upper-division coursework in physics, including Physics 336K, 352K, 453, 362K, 362L, 369, 373, and 474, or their equivalents.
  11. Thirty-six semester hours of upper-division coursework.
  12. At least eighteen semester hours of upper-division coursework, including at least twelve semester hours of upper-division coursework in physics, must be completed in residence at the University.
  13. Enough additional coursework to make a total of 126 semester hours.

Special Requirements

The student must fulfill the University-wide graduation requirements given in chapter 1 and the college requirements given in this chapter. He or she must also earn a grade point average of at least 2.00 in physics courses taken at the University and used to fulfill requirement 10 of the prescribed work above.

Order and Choice of Work

The following is a recommended program of study to fulfill the requirements given under "Prescribed Work" above. The student should consult the faculty adviser each semester regarding order and choice of work.

First year: Physics 301 and 101L; Mathematics 408C and 408D; English 306; three hours of biology and two additional hours of biology, geology, or astronomy; Chemistry 301 and 302.

Second year: Physics 315, 115L, 316, and 116L; Mathematics 427K, 340L or 311, or 364K; English 316K; Chemistry 204; foreign language 506 (or the equivalent); three hours to fulfill requirement 5 under "Prescribed Work."

Third year: Physics 336K, 336L, 338K, 352K, 453, and 373; Mathematics 361, 362K, 365C, 372, or 374; foreign language 507 (or the equivalent) and three hours for which 507 (or the equivalent) is prerequisite; six hours of American government, including Texas government; a three-hour elective to be counted toward requirement 1 under "Prescribed Work."

Fourth year: Physics 362K, 369, 474, and either 362L, 370C, 670T, 375P, 375R, 375S, or 379H; six hours of upper-division mathematics; six hours of American history; three hours to fulfill requirement 8 under "Prescribed Work."

Bachelor of Science in Physics: Teaching Option[1]

This program is designed to fulfill the course requirements for certification as a secondary school teacher in Texas with a science composite teaching field; however, completion of the program does not guarantee the student's certification. For information about additional certification requirements, see chapter 5 of this catalog and consult the University's teacher certification officer in the College of Education.

Prescribed Work

  1. English 306, 316K, and three additional semester hours in English; English 309K or 309L is recommended. In addition, in taking courses to fulfill other degree requirements, the student must complete two courses certified as having a substantial writing component; one of these courses must be upper-division. The additional required course(s) in English may be counted toward this requirement if certified to contain a substantial writing component. If the writing requirement is not fulfilled by courses specified for the degree, the student must fulfill it either with electives or with coursework taken in addition to the number of hours required for the degree. Courses with a substantial writing component are identified in the Course Schedule.
  2. Either two years of high school coursework in a single foreign language or courses 506 and 507 (or the equivalent) in a single foreign language. For students who enter the University with fewer than two high school units in a single foreign language, the first two semesters in a language may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree.
  3. Six semester hours of American government, including Texas government.
  4. Six semester hours of American history.
  5. Psychology 301.
  6. Mathematics 408C, 408D, 427K, 427L, and either 311, 340L, 361, or 362K. Algebra courses at the level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the total number of hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics 301 or 304E without degree credit to remove their deficiency.
  7. Three semester hours in architecture, art (including art history, design, studio art, visual art studies), classics (including classical civilization, Greek, Latin), fine arts, music (including music, instruments, ensemble), philosophy (excluding courses in logic), or theatre and dance.
  8. Six semester hours in human development, consisting of one course from each of the following groups:
    1. Child Development 313, Educational Psychology 363M (Topic 3: Adolescent Development), Psychology 304, 309, 333D, or 339.
    2. Applied Learning and Development 322 or Psychology 345.
  9. Eighteen semester hours in education: Curriculum and Instruction 331C, 332S, 364, 667S (Student Teaching in Secondary Schools: Science), and 370S (Topic 2: Science).
  10. Documented evidence of proficiency in oral communication. Proficiency is assessed in Curriculum and Instruction 332S. Students who lack proficiency must take Speech 305, 319, Theatre and Dance 303, 303C, or 326.
  11. Documented evidence of proficiency in computing or credit for three semester hours in computer sciences, data processing, management information systems, or coursework intended to provide computer literacy. This requirement is fulfilled by completion of Physics 329.
  12. At least nineteen semester hours of upper-division coursework in physics, consisting of Physics 329, 336K, 338K, 453, either 352K, 433, or 373, and a three-hour course approved by the undergraduate adviser, such as Physics 370C or an upper-division astronomy course.
  13. Six semester hours in biological sciences, including Biology 302. Courses intended for nonscience majors may not be counted toward this requirement.
  14. Six semester hours of geology. Courses intended for nonscience majors may not be counted toward this requirement.
  15. To fulfill the teacher certification requirement of twelve semester hours in a second field: Chemistry 301, 302, and either 204 or 317; and either Chemistry 618A and 118K, or 353 and 153K.
  16. At least eighteen semester hours of upper-division coursework, including at least twelve hours of upper-division work in physics taken in residence at the University.
  17. Enough additional coursework to make a total of at least 120 semester hours.

Special Requirements

The student must fulfill the University-wide graduation requirements given in chapter 1 and the college requirements given in this chapter. He or she must also earn a grade point average of at least 2.00 in physics courses taken at the University and used to fulfill requirement 10 of the prescribed work above. For additional teacher certification requirements, see chapter 5 of this catalog and consult the University's teacher certification officer in the College of Education.

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