The University of Texas at Austin
School of Undergraduate Studies
Skip navigation links

Rachel Weiser

Rachel Weiser
Major: 
Government
BDP Certificate: 
Environment
Graduation: 
Summer 2006

I am the Midwest finance director for the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee.

Location: Washington, D.C.

“My BDP experience taught me the importance of interdisciplinary studies in my career.”

Discuss your general career path since graduating from UT.

As an undergraduate student, I was bitten by the political bug and started working full-time. My first race was former Mayor of Dallas Ron Kirk’s U.S. Senate bid against John Cornyn in 2002. After the election, I moved to Washington, D.C. to work on The Two Americas with Stan Greenberg, and later returned to UT to finish my degree. Taking a break from politics, I worked as an environmental consultant for a few years until I realized that I enjoy affecting change. Now back in D.C., I am a fundraiser, and work for the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee.

How did your BDP experience influence your career path and interests?

My BDP experience taught me the importance of interdisciplinary studies in my career. It allowed me to study and become an expert in an interdisciplinary area while applying what I learned to my major in government. This created what I like to call connecting the synapses. Further, my BDP gave me opportunities to connect with people, ideas, and levels of government that provided me with career options. One of my favorite jobs was when I was in the political department at the American Association for Justice working with the BP oil spill.

In what ways did an interdisciplinary education prepare you for what you are currently doing?

In a fundamental way, my BDP experience instilled in me that all pieces of the puzzle are important. This applies to my job at the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee, which entails finding the puzzle pieces and putting them together to ensure that many voices are heard. I find no better reward than creating a megaphone for the American voting public.