MAJOR: ENGINEERING ROUTE TO BUSINESS
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Note: The Engineering Route to Business major has been eliminated in the 2012-2014 catalog and is no longer accepting new students. In its place, McCombs School of Business has created a new major, Science & Technology Management. A new Wayfinder page will be created shortly. The spirit of the major is the same as ERB, but it is set up differently. Students no longer pick an engineering block and a business block; instead, they are required to choose from a list of engineering courses and a list of business courses.

The Engineering Route to Business Program (ERB) is a rigorous and challenging degree plan that satisfies industry's demand for technologically savvy graduates who have backgrounds in both engineering and business. In the ERB Program, students take engineering, math, and science classes while working toward a Bachelor of Business Administration degree. ERB students develop a broad strategic perspective of business principles and acquire a solid command of the technical fundamentals of engineering. The combination of engineering and business culminates in students leaving the program well prepared for success in managing highly technical business environments.

In addition to specific required business and engineering courses, the program contains two block options designed to help students develop greater competence in particular aspects of engineering and business: a four-course engineering block option and a three-course business block option. This major prepares students for management and sales positions in companies that specialize in high-tech engineering, manufacturing, and consulting.

Declare This Major

Note: The Engineering Route to Business major has been eliminated in the 2012-2014 catalog and is no longer accepting new students. In its place, McCombs School of Business has created a new major, Science & Technology Management. A new Wayfinder page will be created shortly. The spirit of the major is the same as ERB, but it is set up differently. Students no longer pick an engineering block and a business block; instead, they are required to choose from a list of engineering courses and a list of business courses.

Undergraduates currently enrolled at The University of Texas at Austin who wish to change to a business major need to apply for an internal transfer. Internal transfer applicants are students currently enrolled at The University of Texas at Austin who are seeking to transfer within or into a major in the McCombs School of Business. Find out more about the internal transfer process, including the procedures, requirements to apply, historical summary of acceptance, and additional opportunities.

Prospective University of Texas at Austin students should visit to learn about the application process and how to declare a major.

Required Courses

View the engineering route to business degree plan to learn more about the required courses for the engineering route to business major.

Specializations

The engineering route to business major offers a combination of classes in both a three course business block and a four course engineering block. The student will choose one concentration from each block and complete courses that fit focus of that concentration. The student may choose any combination of the two blocks. View the ERB degree planning page for more information.

Personality

The typical engineering route to business major is a student trying to capitalize on their technical skills. Most students are interested in both engineering and business and are very logical thinkers. They are usually very hard workers with a strong sense of discipline. ERB is not meant for someone who wants to be an engineer, but rather someone who will be working alongside engineers.

Skills

  • Time management skills
  • Natural aptitude for math and science
  • Strict discipline
  • Ability to multi-task and focus on multiple concepts (combines classes from two difficult colleges)
  • Analytical and problem solving skills
  • Ability to manage projects through independent and group environments
  • Technical skills (required to take computer programming courses and rigorous science classes)