Welcome to UTakeCharge

U Take Charge logoThe UTakeCharge program is all about reducing energy and water consumption on The University of Texas at Austin campus. Initiated in 2007, UTakeCharge calls the entire campus community to expand energy and water conservation awareness into everyday activities.

The university’s Facilities Services and Project Management and Construction Services departments are taking charge of reducing energy and water consumption by undertaking demand-side energy management and conservation projects.

Lighting, water and steam projects will save about $2.8 million per year in energy and water costs and reduce our carbon footprint by 35 million pounds of carbon!

For details about project savings and our carbon footprint reduction, visit our Projects site.

UTakeCharge is not only about repairs and renovations.

It's also about creating a campus culture of sustainability. More can be done to save energy and water if You Take Charge! Use the news, tips and other useful tools on this site to learn about what you can do to reduce energy and water consumption on campus.

UTakeCharge . . . Creating a Culture of Sustainable Energy Management and Conservation.

 

 

 

 

 

Cable Boxes Hog Energy

Read New York Times article.

EPA Seeks Comments on WaterSense Certification

EPA has revised the WaterSense product certification system to complement ENERGY STAR’s system. EPA is accepting written comments on the Draft Revised Product Certification System through July 25, 2011, and will hold a public meeting via webinar and conference call on July 13, 2011, from 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. EST to discuss the draft revisions. To review the Draft Revised Product Certification System or for information on how to submit comments, visit the WaterSense website.

Austin's Largest Solar Power System Installed on J. J. Pickle Research Campus

Read article.

Bring Your Green to Work

ENERGY STAR reminds you how to be more "green" in the workplace and at home with this handy tip card.

How Big is Your Footprint?

How much CO2 your lifestyle creates is called your "carbon footprint." Answer a few easy questions to learn the approximate size of your footprint. Learn about UT Austin's carbon footprint.