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1994

6 x 9 in.
372 pp., 1 b&w illus.

ISBN: 978-0-292-71571-4
$29.95, paperback
33% website discount: $20.07
Print-on-demand title; expedited shipping not available



 

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Iphigenia
(The diary of a young lady who wrote because she was bored)

By Teresa de la Parra
Translated by Bertie Acker

 

Table of Contents and Excerpt

1994 Harvey L. Johnson Award
Southwest Council on Latin American Studies

 

"...de la Parra conveys the intensity of Iphigenia's rebellious voice, the range of her intelligence and the degree of her sexual obsessiveness. But [she] also anticipates Simone de Beauvoir's warning that brains and sexual liberation don't matter at all without a firm economic base."

—Barbara Probst Solomon, Nation

"...I didn't want to tell you the truth for anything in the world, because it seemed very humiliating to me..." The truth is that Iphigenia is bored and, more than bored, buried alive in her grandmother's house in Caracas, Venezuela. After the excitement of being a beautiful, unchaperoned young woman in Paris, her father's death has sent her back to a forgotten homeland, where rigid decorum governs. Two men—the married man she adores and the wealthy fiancé she abhors—offer her escape from her prison. Which of these impossible suitors will she choose?

Iphigenia was first published in 1924 in Venezuela, where it hit patriarchal society like a bomb. Teresa de la Parra was accused of undermining the morals of young women with this tale of a passionate woman who lacks the money to establish herself in the liberated, bohemian society she craves. Yet readers have kept the novel alive for decades, and this first English translation now introduces its heroine to a wider audience.

Teresa de la Parra was also the author of Las memorias de Mamá Blanca (Mama Blanca's Souvenirs). Translator Bertie Acker is a professor emerita of Spanish at the University of Texas at Arlington.

Texas Pan American Series

 Of Related Interest Alencar, Senhora

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