Diversity

Statue of civil rights champion Barbara Jordan on UT Campus

A More Diverse and Welcoming Campus

The University of Texas at Austin announced steps to promote diversity and equity and to recruit, attract, retain and support more Black students, faculty and staff on campus. These actions will include expanding programs that provide opportunities for future Black leaders, changing the name of the Robert L. Moore Building, adding historical context to existing names on campus, dedicating new statues, and acknowledging and owning the history of “The Eyes of Texas” while redefining the meaning of the song as we continue to sing it. Read the full message here.

UT Diversity Statement

As The University of Texas at Austin strives to meet its mission of unlocking potential and preparing future leaders of the state, it embraces diversity in many forms. The university is dedicated to attracting highly-qualified students, faculty and staff with a wide range of backgrounds, ideas and viewpoints. This includes those from all races and ethnicities; first-generation college students; women; and others who have been historically underrepresented on campus.

As a university with a past history of denying equitable access to qualified students, UT recognizes the profound benefits of creating an inclusive environment in which students can learn from one another. All students are better prepared to succeed in an increasingly diverse state and interconnected society when they receive the educational benefits of learning on a diverse campus.
 

A message from Interim President Jay Hartzell

"UT can be a world-class university only if we embrace the ideas and perspectives of a truly diverse set of talented people — of every background, race and life experience. That is how we can solve the hardest problems facing Texas, our country and the world. It is also how we can best enable our students to learn, develop and lead while they are on our campus, in their careers and throughout their lives. But it goes even deeper than that. Our university has made great strides in its commitment to diversity and inclusion in recent years, but we have much more progress to make. Our goal is to create an environment on the Forty Acres where all community members — students, faculty and staff — are empowered to be true to themselves, to participate fully in our vibrant university and to thrive as individuals. We won’t rest until we reach that goal.” 

— Jay Hartzell, Interim President

UT by the Numbers

Fall 2019


Wheel chart of population of Undergraduates by Race at the University of Texas

Undergraduates by Race/Ethnicity

Race %
 White only 38.8
 Hispanic (any combination) 24.4
 Black 5.1
 Asian only 22.6
 American Indian only 0.2
 Hawaiian/Pac. Islander only 0.2
 2 or more (excl. Hisp./Black) 2.9
 Foreign 5.2
 Unknown 0.8
Wheel chart of population of Graduates by Race at the University of Texas

Graduates by Race/Ethnicity

Race %
 White only 42.1
 Hispanic (any combination) 11.5
 Black  4.1
 Asian only 8.1
 American Indian only 0.2
 Hawaiian/Pac. Islander only 0
 2 or more (excl. Hisp./Black) 1.6
 Foreign 29.9
 Unknown 2.6

Wheel chart of population of Faculty by Race at the University of Texas

Faculty by Race/Ethnicity

Race %
 White only 71.6
 Hispanic (any combination) 8.6
 Black  4.4
 Asian only 9.5
 American Indian only 0.2
 Hawaiian/Pac. Islander only 0
 2 or more (excl. Hisp./Black) 1.0
 Foreign 4.3
 Unknown 0.3
Wheel chart of population of Undergraduates by Gender at the University of Texas

Undergraduates by Gender

Gender %
 Male 45.5
 Female 54.5

Wheel chart of population of Graduates by Gender at the University of Texas

Graduates by Gender

Gender %
 Male 51.0
 Female 49.0
Wheel chart of population of Faculty by Gender at the University of Texas

Faculty by Gender

Gender %
 Male 59
 Female 41

Percent of Students by residence in a circular bar chart.

Students by Residence

Residence %
 Texas 79.7
 Out-of-State 10.3
 Foreign 10.0

Diversity Programs, Offices, Centers, and Initiatives

Multicultural Engagement Center

Multicultural Engagement Center

For 25 years, the Multicultural Engagement Center has developed student leaders and offered a home away from home for students of color.

Office of Institutional Equity

Office for Inclusion and Equity

OIE investigates discrimination complaints, and facilitates inclusive faculty recruitment and diversity planning. Through education and policies, OIE ensures compliance with civil rights laws.

Council for LGBTQ+ Co-chair Stephen Russell, Edmund T. Gordon, Council for LGBTQ+ Co-chair Lisa Moore, Elizabeth Donihoo

Council for LGBTQ+ Access, Equity, and Inclusion (Q+AEI)

The Council for LGBTQ+ Access, Equity, and Inclusion (Q+AEI) works to address issues of access, equity, and inclusion among faculty based on gender identity and/or sexual orientation. Q+AEI supports the development of programs to improve the campus-wide climate and institutional reputation for equity relating to gender and sexuality, including queer people of color.

Attendees at the GSC Open House

Gender and Sexuality Center (GSC)

The mission of the Gender and Sexuality Center (GSC) is to provide opportunities for all members of the UT Austin community to explore, organize, and promote learning around issues of gender and sexuality. The center also facilitates a greater responsiveness to the needs of women and the LGBTQIA+ communities through education, outreach, and advocacy.

Services for UT Students with Disabilities

Services for Students with Disabilities (SSD)

SSD ensures students with disabilities have equal access to their academic experiences at the University of Texas at Austin by determining eligibility and approving reasonable accommodations. We also engage in outreach across campus in order to make campus a more inclusive, accessible and welcoming environment for people with disabilities.

Students at the Longhorn Center for Academic Excellence

Longhorn Center for Academic Excellence

We are a learning community that empowers students personally, academically, and professionally to become innovative, productive and engaged global citizens who are committed to social responsibility and promoting a diverse community of people, ideas, and perspectives.

CREED Co-Chairs

Council for Racial and Ethnic Equity and Diversity (CREED)

CREED began work in the fall of 2015 to fulfill its mission to advise the provost on best practices in recruiting, retaining, and advancing faculty members who are racially, ethnically, gender, or in other ways diverse. CREED also works in collaboration with colleges and departments to develop initiatives and programs to improve the campus climate for diverse faculty.

University Faculty Gender Equity Council

University Faculty Gender Equity Council

The University Faculty Gender Equity Council annually conducts an analysis of faculty salaries to document gender pay inequities. The council also conducts an analysis of gender inequities in time to promotion for tenure and to full professor and the number of endowments given to male versus female faculty. Additionally, the council presents best practices for creating an equitable and inclusive environment for faculty.

UT Faculty member teaching in a classroom

National Center for Faculty Development & Diversity (NCFDD) Institutional Membership

The University of Texas at Austin is an institutional member of the National Center for Faculty Development & Diversity (NCFDD). The NCFDD is a nationally-recognized independent organization dedicated to supporting faculty, particularly under-represented faculty, post-docs, and graduate students in making successful transitions throughout their careers. NCFDD provides online career development, training, and mentoring resources.


Student holding sign saying "I still have a dream" on MLK Day

Campus Culture

Because diverse people, perspectives and ideas create an optimal learning and working environment, we strive to foster an inclusive, accessible and welcoming campus culture.

Diversity Education Initiatives

Dynamics of Diversity Certificate Courses

UT Austin employees can learn more about managing diverse teams and working with students, staff and faculty from all backgrounds as well as how campus climate, Title IX, and implicit bias can affect our culture at work.