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Mary Neuburger, Director BUR 452, 2505 University Avenue, Stop F3600, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-3607

Charters Wynn

Associate Professor Ph.D., 1987, Stanford University

Charters Wynn

Contact

  • Phone: 512-475-7234
  • Office: GAR 1.120
  • Office Hours: T 1-3
  • Campus Mail Code: B7000

Biography

Research interests

Soviet political and labor history. He is currently working on a study of NEP Russia and the early Stalinist period tentatively titled, "From the Factory to the Kremlin: Mikhail Tomsky and Soviet Trade Unionism."

Courses taught

Undergraduate and graduate courses on Revolutionary Russia and Stalinist Russia as well as the undergraduate Soviet survey. He also teaches Stalin's Russia at War as a faculty member in the Normandy Scholar Program.

Awards/Honors

Eyes of Texas Excellence Award, fall 2006
Raymond Dickson Centennial Endowed Teaching Fellowship 2008

REE 385 • Soviet Union: Wwii-Collapse

45273 • Fall 2014
Meets F 900am-1200pm GAR 1.122
(also listed as HIS 383 )
show description

This graduate “reading” seminar will examine the history and historiography of the Soviet Union from World War II to the collapse of the Soviet system in 1991.  Much of the course will focus on the interaction between the party-state and society: both how government policies affected people's daily lives and how social and economic realities, as well as popular expectations and intelligentsia resistance, shaped and constrained state policy.  We also devote considerable attention to Soviet foreign policy during the Cold War.

 

Work/Grading: Weekly reviews of the readings, two pages in length each, constitute the written work for the course.  The final grade will be based on class participation as well as on the written work.

 

Readings:

Richard Overy, Russia’s War: A History of the Soviet War Effort: 1941-1945.

Rebecca Manley, To the Tashkent Station: Evacuation and Survival in the Soviet Union

at War.

Amir Weiner, Making Sense of War: The Second World War and the Fate of the

Bolshevik Revolution.

Elena Zubkova, Russia after the War: Hope, Illusions, and Disappointment, 1945-1957.

William Taubman, Khrushchev: The Man and His Era.

Miriam Dobson, Khrushchev’s Cold Summer: Gulag Returnees, Crime, and the Fate of

Reform after Stalin.

Aleksandr  Fursenko & Timothy Naftali, Khrushchev’s Cold War: The Inside Story of an

American Adversary.

Vladislav Zubok, Zhivago’s Children: The Last Russian Intelligentsia.

Donald Raleigh, Soviet Baby Boomers: An Oral History of Russia’s Cold War

Generation.

Vladislav Zubok, A Failed Empire: The Soviet Union in the Cold War from Stalin to

Gorbachev.

Stephen Kotkin, Armageddon Averted: The Soviet Collapse 1970-2000.

Archie Brown, The Gorbachev Factor.

Alexei Yurchak, Everything Was Forever, Until It Was No More: The Last Soviet

Generation.

REE 335 • History Of Russia Since 1917

45530 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm CLA 0.128
(also listed as HIS 343M )
show description

REE 385 • Stalinist Russia

45310 • Fall 2013
Meets F 900am-1200pm GAR 1.122
(also listed as HIS 383 )
show description

This graduate seminar will examine the history and historiography of the Stalinist period.  Much of the course will focus on the interaction between the party-state and society: both how government policies affected people's daily lives and how social and economic realities, as well as popular resistance, shaped and constrained state policy.  We will also focus on the brutal war on the Eastern Front, including its origins and legacy.

Texts:

Fitzpatrick, Sheila.  Stalin's Peasants: Resistance and Survival in the Russian Village     after Collectivization.

Kotkin, Stephen.  Magnetic Mountain: Stalinism as a Civilization.

Fitzpatrick, Sheila.  Everyday Stalinism: Ordinary Life in Extraordinary Times.

Getty, J. Arch.  The Road to Terror: Stalin and the Self-Destruction of the     Bolsheviks, 1932-1939.

Viola, Lynne.  The Unknown Gulag: The Lost World of Special Settlements.

Figes, Orlando.  The Whisperers: Private Life in Stalin’s Russia.

Applebaum, Anne.  Gulag: A History.

Merridale, Catherine.  Ivan’s War: Life and Death in the Red Army, 1939-1945.

Gorodetsky, Gabriel.  Grand Delusion: Stalin and the German Invasion of Russia.

Gorlizki, Oleg.  Cold Peace: Stalin and the Soviet Ruling Circle, 1945-1953.

Roberts, Geoffrey. Stalin’s Wars: From World War to Cold War, 1939-1953.

Kirschenbaum, Lisa.  The Legacy of the Siege of Leningrad, 1941-1995: Myth,     Memories, and Monuments.

Grading:

Weekly reviews of the readings, two pages in length each, constitute the written work for the course.  The final grade will be based on class participation as well as on the written work.

REE 335 • History Of Russia Since 1917

44830 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm UTC 4.110
(also listed as HIS 343M )
show description

REE 385 • Revolutionary Russia

44740 • Fall 2012
Meets F 900am-1200pm GAR 1.122
(also listed as HIS 383 )
show description

Description: The purpose of this graduate reading course is to introduce students to the literature and historiographic debates in Russian history from the end of the imperial regime to the beginning of the Stalinist era.  The readings, a mix of older and newer works, will focus on both the “high” politics of the period and the social and political pressure from “below.” 

Textbooks/Reading:  The books will all be available for purchase in paperback editions from the University Co-op, 2246 Guadalupe.

Figes, Orlando. A People’s Tragedy: The Russian Revolution: 1891- 1924.

Pipes, Richard. The Russian Revolution.

Read, Christopher. From Tsar to Soviets: The Russian People and Their Revolution, 1917-21.

Stone, Norman. The Eastern Front, 1914-1917.

Gatrell, Peter. A Whole Empire Walking: Refugees in Russia during World War I.

Rabinowitch, Alexander. The Bolsheviks Come to Power.

Lincoln, W. Bruce. Red Victory: A History of the Russian Civil War.

Deutscher, Isaac. The Prophet Unarmed: Trotsky, 1921-1929.

Cohen, Stephen. Bukharin and the Bolshevik Revolution: A Political Biography, 1888-1938.

Stites, Richard. Revolutionary Dreams: Utopian Vision and Experimental Life in the Russian Revolution.

Goldman, Wendy. Women, the State and Revolution: Soviet Family Policy and Social Life, 1917-1936.

Work/Grading: Weekly reviews of the readings, two pages in length each, constitute the written work for the course.  The final grade will be based on class participation as well as on the written work.

REE 335 • History Of Russia Since 1917

44665 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 930am-1100am UTC 4.112
(also listed as HIS 343M )
show description

Course Description: Winston Churchill described the Soviet Union as “a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma.”  I hope you will find the country somewhat less perplexing after studying the political, social, economic, cultural, diplomatic, and military developments that shaped Russian history during the 20th century.  We will devote particular attention to four milestones of Soviet history: the Russian Revolution; Stalin’s “Revolution from Above”; World War II; and the Collapse of the Soviet System.  We will also focus on the Cold War, why attempts at reform failed under Khrushchev, Gorbachev, and Yeltsin, and the emergence of a dissident movement during the Brezhnev era.  How state policies affected ordinary people will be examined throughout the course.  You will gain an appreciation of the almost unimaginable suffering the Soviet people experienced.  Many of the readings have been selected with an eye toward introducing you to primary documents and the major historiographic debates in Soviet history.  We will also read a memoir, a novel and view film clips and documentary footage.

Grading: Three in-class examinations worth one-third each. 

Textbooks:

John Thompson, Revolutionary Russia, 1917.

Martin McCauley, Stalin and Stalinism.

John Scott, Behind the Urals.

Arthur Koestler, Darkness at Noon.

Geoffrey Roberts, Victory at Stalingrad.

Martin McCauley, The Khrushchev Era.

Robert Strayer, Why Did the Soviet Union Collapse?

Course Packet: The Packet is available from Paradigm, 407 W. 24th St., 472-7986.

REE 385 • Stalinist Russia

44535 • Fall 2011
Meets F 900am-1200pm GAR 1.122
(also listed as HIS 383 )
show description

“We will keep out the kulaks” – propaganda poster from 1930 

                                                   

Description: This graduate seminar will examine the history and historiography of the Stalinist period.  The course will focus primarily on the interaction between the party-state and society: both how the policies of Stalin and his entourage affected people’s daily lives and how social and economic realities shaped and constrained state policy.  We will focus on forced collectivization and industrialization, mass terror, the “Great Patriotic War,” and post-war Stalinism.  We will end with a book on the intelligentsia after Stalin’s death.  Over the course of the semester you will gain an appreciation of the almost unimaginable suffering people experienced in Stalin’s Soviet Union. 

Work/Grading: Weekly reviews of the readings, two pages in length each, constitute the written work for the course.  The final grade will be based on class participation as well as on the written work.

WEEKLY SCHEDULE

WEEK ONE: 8/26  Introduction

WEEK TWO: 9/2  Naimark, Norman.  Stalin’s Genocides.

WEEK THREE: 9/9  Viola, Lynne.  The Unknown Gulag.

WEEK FOUR: 9/16  Kotkin, Stephen.  Magnetic Mountain: Stalinism as a Civilization.

WEEK FIVE: 9/23 Fitzpatrick, Sheila.  Everyday Stalinism: Ordinary Life in Extraordinary Times.

WEEK SIX: 9/30 Getty, J. Arch.  The Road to Terror: Stalin and the Self-Destruction of the Bolsheviks, 1932-1939.

WEEK SEVEN: 10/7 Figes, Orlando.  The Whisperers: Private Life in Stalin’s Russia

WEEK EIGHT: 10/14 Applebaum, Anne.  Gulag: A History.

WEEK NINE: 10/21 Overy, Richard.  Russia’s War: A History of the Soviet War Effort: 1941-1945.

WEEK TEN: 10/28 Merridale, Catherine.  Ivan’s War: Life and Death in the Red Army, 1939-1945

WEEK ELEVEN: 11/4   Gorlizki, Yoram and Oleg Khlevniuk.  Cold Peace: Stalin and the SovieT Ruling Circle, 1945-1953 

WEEK TWELVE: 11/11 Zubkova, Elena, Russia after the War: Hopes, Illusions, and Disappointment, 1945-1957

WEEK THIRTEEN: 11/18 ASSOCIATION FOR SLAVIC, EAST EUROPEAN AND EURASIAN STUDIES CONVENTION – NO CLASS

WEEK FOURTEEN: 11/25 THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY – NO CLASS

WEEK FIFTEEN: 12/2 Zubok, Vladislav, Zhivago’s Children: The Last Russian Intelligentsia

REE S335 • History Of Russia Since 1917

88165 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm UTC 4.112
(also listed as HIS S343M )
show description

Course Description: Winston Churchill described the Soviet Union as “a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma.”  I hope you will find the country somewhat less perplexing after studying the political, social, economic, cultural, diplomatic, and military developments that shaped Russian history during the 20th century.  We will devote particular attention to four milestones of Soviet history: the Russian Revolution; Stalin’s “Revolution from Above”; World War II; and the Collapse of the Soviet System.  We will also focus on the Cold War, why attempts at reform failed under Khrushchev, Gorbachev, and Yeltsin, and the emergence of a dissident movement during the Brezhnev era.  How state policies affected ordinary people will be examined throughout the course.  You will gain an appreciation of the almost unimaginable suffering the Soviet people experienced.  Many of the readings have been selected with an eye toward introducing you to primary documents and the major historiographic debates in Soviet history.  We will also read a memoir, a novel and view film clips and documentary footage.

 

Grading: Three in-class examinations worth one-third each. 

 

Textbooks:

John Thompson, Revolutionary Russia, 1917.

Martin McCauley, Stalin and Stalinism.

John Scott, Behind the Urals.

Arthur Koestler, Darkness at Noon.

Geoffrey Roberts, Victory at Stalingrad.

Martin McCauley, The Khrushchev Era.

Robert Strayer, Why Did the Soviet Union Collapse?

Course Packet: The Packet is available from Paradigm, 407 W. 24th St., 472-7986.

REE 335 • History Of Russia Since 1917

45230 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm UTC 4.112
(also listed as HIS 343M )
show description

REE 385 • Revolutionary Russia

44635 • Fall 2010
Meets F 900am-1200pm GAR 1.122
(also listed as HIS 383 )
show description

The revolutionary turmoil of the 1917 Revolutions, and the Civil War the Communists' seizure of power triggered, allow us to examine in depth the political, social, economic, and cultural dynamics at work in early twentieth-century Russia.  The Russian Revolution, which began in 1905, provides much of the prism through which we view processes of revolutionary change.  Moreover, the mass and variety of scholarly attention lavished on it makes Revolutionary Russia an ideal subject for studying different approaches to history.  The issue of possible alternative outcomes, which has always engaged Western historians of the Russian Revolution, is now of considerable interest in the former Soviet Union, which once again finds itself in a state of flux, facing an uncertain future.

Texts

Some of the readings will analyze the revolutionary process.  Others will convey the excitement and suffering in the streets.  In addition, short documents may be distributed in class.

Read, Christopher, From Tsar to Soviets.

Pipes, Richard, A Concise History of the Russian Revolution.

Figes, Orlando, A People’s Tragedy.

*Course Packet: Selections from the Packet are noted by an asterisk in the Weekly Schedule.  The Packet is available from Pardigm,  407 W. 24th St., 472-7986.

Requirements and Grading

The final grade is based on the essays (65%), weekly questions (10%), and classroom participation (25%).  Each student is expected to participate fully in class discussions and will be graded on the extent and quality of participation.  It is therefore mandatory that you complete the assigned readings before each class session and come to class prepared to discuss the readings.  The course will not work otherwise. 

 

 

REE 335 • History Of Russia Since 1917

87660 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 230pm-400pm UTC 4.132
(also listed as HIS 343M )
show description

Winston Churchill described the Soviet Union as “a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma.”  I hope you will find the country somewhat less perplexing after studying the political, social, economic, cultural, diplomatic, and military developments that shaped Russian history during the 20th century.  We will devote particular attention to four milestones of Soviet history: the Russian Revolutions; Stalin’s “Revolution from Above”; World War II; and the Collapse of the Soviet System.  We will also focus on the Cold War, why attempts at reform failed under Khrushchev, Gorbachev, and Yeltsin, and the emergence of a dissident movement during the Brezhnev era.  How state policies affected ordinary people will be examined throughout the course.  Over the course of the session you will gain an appreciation of the almost unimaginable suffering the Soviet people experienced.  Many of the readings have been selected with an eye toward introducing you to primary documents and the major historiographic debates in Soviet history.  We will also read a memoir and view film clips and documentary footage.

 

Grading

Three in-class examinations worth one-third each.

 

Readings

Ronald Grigor Suny, The Soviet Experiment.
John Thompson, Revolutionary Russia, 1917.
John Scott, Behind the Urals.
Geoffrey Roberts, Victory at Stalingrad.
*Course Packet

Publications

Wynn, C. (2007, December) Review of Russia's Revolutionary Experience, 1905-1917: Two Essays. Journal of Modern History 79(4), 956-957.

Wynn, C. (1992) Workers, Strikes, and Pogroms: The Donbass-Dnepr Bend in Late Imperial Russia, 1870-1905. Princeton University Press.

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